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Japan Type Set #7460

Category:  World Coins
Owner:  Star City Homer
Last Modified:  11/30/2017
Set Description




A type set of Japanese coins modeled after the Dansco #7460 “Japan Type Set” album.

The album was initially published in 1966, followed by an updated edition that included the new style 50 and 100 yen coins as well as the 1970 Expo Commemorative.

The album contains the modern style Japanese coinage dating from the third year of the Meiji reign or era (1870) through the 45th year of the Showa era (1970). Though there are coins dated M2 (1869) those were not included in the album as they were pattern issues and thus outside the scope of the album. Gold coinage was also not included in this album.

This link is to the website page that has pictures of the physical Dansco album that this graded set is modeled after:

http://www.starcityhomer.com/dansco-japan-type-set.html
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‘Modern’ Japanese coins are those that were minted after the Meiji Restoration when a new, standardized, monetary system was established. This included the importation of Western style equipment and specialists, and starting to mint coins that were made to a specific weight and fineness standard.

‘Current’ coinage refers to coins minted under the auspices of the current government which was established by constitution after WWII. This includes the coins circulating now but there are several obsolete issues as well.

The initial modern coins bore the legend ‘Dai Nippon’ which basically translates to ‘Great Japan’. The legend was changed to ‘Nippon koku’ or ‘Country of Japan’ on the current coinage. There are several interim coins minted after the war, but before the constitution was adopted, that bear ‘Nippon seifu’ or ‘Government of Japan’.
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This set is organized such that the slots in the virtual set reflects the spaces in the Dansco album in the order in which they appear. Basically these are organized by era (Meiji, Taisho and Showa), then by denomination, date and types.
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‘JNDA’ refers to the Japan Numismatic Dealers Association, which publishes an annual catalog of coins and notes. Its organization is considered the standard reference. The catalog has coin mintage and details, commentary, and serves as a price guide. It was a valuable source of information for this set. The catalog is written primarily in Japanese, but there is enough English to understand the basic information and descriptions.
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Of note, several coins that occupy different slots in this set share a JNDA number and description. Several issues cataloged by the JNDA may span two eras or may have minor design changes that are ‘lumped’ together (such as going from square shaped to 'sharp' shaped dragon scales). The Dansco designers opted to ‘split’ these issues instead. Krause (and NGC in its Registry organization) tends to split eras by century as well.

As this is the ‘7460 set’, the Dansco version of organization is used here.
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Dates are primarily listed by the regnal era dating used in Japan with reference to the corresponding Gregorian date.

An explanation of Japanese coin dating can be found in several places on the internet. Mine is here:

http://www.starcityhomer.com/japan-coin-dating-etc.html

(the website is still adding content but the coin dating/legend page is complete).
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Three minor modifications have been made to this set vs. the 7460.

The first is the addition of an extra slot to allow for both versions of the ‘gin’ marked coins (an explanation of gin marks is given under the individual coin’s description).

The second modification is that the slots have been partially re-titled. Basically the slot descriptions have been expanded to show more information, primarily by adding the JNDA English descriptors. Minor printing or information errors are indicated, but otherwise the slots remain intact and in the same order of appearance.

Third, I used a small cheat for one coin—the currently circulating 50 yen coin. I don’t have a graded example for the years included in the album. In fact there are less than 10 examples graded by NGC that do fall within the dating parameters (likely because this is quite literally pocket change). Eventually I will replace it with a graded version from the correct date range.
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Varieties are not required for this set as they are not included as part of the Dansco album—though individual coins are noted as such in the comments section if that coin happens to be an example of one (eg. deep vs. shallow dragon scales, connected vs. separated characters, etc).
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Regarding the three slots listed as ‘want’ coins (vs. owned):

My two ‘gin’ marked yen coins and my trade dollar have not been graded. Both yen coins can kindly be called ‘well scrubbed’ and are not good enough examples to warrant grading. The trade dollar suffered a much more gentle cleaning but has not yet had a ‘grading event’—though it is appealing enough and valuable enough that it will likely be sent in at some point.

Because they are ungraded the coins have been added to the set as 'want'. This made it possible to populate the comment section with pictures and descriptive information.
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Set Goals
The goal for this set is to mirror the Dansco #7460 ‘Japan Type Set’ album with high quality graded coins.

My Japanese coin collecting was sparked when I was living in Japan and developed an interest in the money I was using on a daily basis. I was lucky enough to find the Dansco type set album (they are long out of print and quite scarce) and my collecting started in earnest with my attempts to fill it.

As the overall collection began to include higher grades, conditional rarities or more valuable coins, many coins were obtained that were graded in third party slabs. The paper album has pretty nice coins, but frankly, some coins were just too nice or had too reactive a metal to be placed in the somewhat elderly album.

The desire to avoid ‘cracking’ the nicer coins resulted in this mirror set idea. So, one type set resides in the album, and the second set is represented here. The coins remain in their protective slabs (inside their protective Intercept bags and inside an Intercept box).
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A future project could include the circulation and commemorative coins through the current Emperor and date. Optimistically a future set could be extended to include varieties and even include gold coinage as well.

However, for now, the goals are to complete the final slots for the virtual representation of a complete #7460 album using graded coins and to improve the examples when able.
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Slot Name
Origin/Country
Item Description
Full Grade
Owner Comments
Pics
View Coin Meiji, 5 sen, sun+dragon, 1870-1871 JAPAN 5S M3(1870) SHALLOW SCALES NGC MS 64 JNDA 01-33. Dragon obverse and rising sun reverse. These motifs were represented by all the silver denominations produced in the years 1870-1871.

Shallow and deep scale variants exist, with the deep being the more difficult to obtain.

16.15 mm in diameter, 0.800 fine silver, weight 1.25 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 5 sen character, sun, 1871 JAPAN 5S M4(1871) 53 RAYS NGC MS 65 JNDA 01-34. 1871 saw a second design in the 5 sen denomination--the 'large character' obverse replacing the dragon motif, while retaining the 'rising sun' reverse. The coin has two varieties with relation to how many rays are around the sun, how many beads encircle the sun, and with difference in some of the foliage appearance. Specifically, there are the 53 rays/65 beads, vs. 66 rays/79 beads. Rather than counting I find it much easier to look and see if the beads are touching or not.

16.15 mm diameter, 0.800 fineness, and 1.25 gram weight (unchanged vs. the prior design).
View Coin Meiji, 10 sen, sun+dragon, 1870 JAPAN 10S M3(1870) SHALLOW SCALES NGC MS 65 JNDA 01-23. Dragon obverse and rising sun reverse motifs. Shallow and deep scale variants exist, with the deep being the more difficult to obtain.

Diameter 17.57, .800 fine silver, weight 2.5 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 20 sen, sun+dragon, 1870-1871 JAPAN 20S M4(1871) NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-20. The 1870-1871 20 sen coin is similar to the other silver denominations with the dragon obverse and rising sun reverse motifs. 1870 is notable for a shallow and deep scale variety. 1871 has two variants where a portion of the sen character is weak and is either 'complete' or 'incomplete'. This is the complete variety.

24 mm diameter, 0.800 fine silver, weight 5.00 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 50 sen, sun+dragon large size, 1870-1871 JAPAN 50S M3(1870) NGC MS 65 JNDA 01-13. Dragon obverse and rising sun reverse. For this denomination there is no 'shallow' scale version or any other variant listed for year 3 in the JNDA. The M4/1871 does have one which regard to the shape of one of the character strokes.

After the initial minting the 50 sen was subsequently given a smaller diameter (same weight) in the next type, JNDA 01-13A.

31.51 mm diameter, .800 fine silver, weight 12.5 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 50 sen, sun+dragon small size, 1871 JAPAN 50S M4(1871) 19mm DRAGON CIRCLE PCGS MS 65 JNDA 01-13A. Continues the dragon and rising sun motifs, but now with a reduced coin diameter. The weight remains the same as the prior JNDA 01-13. This JNDA number encompasses two varieties that have individual Y#s.

The two varieties are based on the diameter of the beaded circle around the dragon figure. Other than an actual measurement the primary mode of differentiating the two types is how many spines a specific flame extends (reflecting the 21 vs. 19 mm measurement of the beaded circle). The more common type (Y# 4a.1) is the 19 mm and shows three spines cleared. The less common (Y# 4a.2) only clears 2 spines fully. Spine shape and location is a secondary feature.

If you think you are looking at a 2 spine version, it is more likely you are seeing the larger diameter coin (JNDA 01-13 or Y# 4) and not the rarer version of this smaller diameter coin. If you are unable to take an accurate measurement of the coin or beaded circle then the features of the tail shape/spine placement and shape of the 'elbow' spines can be used to determine which Y# is applicable. In other words large coin diameter vs. small coin diameter, and if the smaller diameter coin then either 19 or 21 mm beaded circle diameter.

Diameter 31 mm (vs. 31.51 on the larger size coin). .800 fine sliver. Weight 12.5 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 1 yen, old type sun+dragon, 1870 JAPAN YEN M3(1870) TYPE 1 NGC MS 65 JNDA 01-9. The dragon/rising sun silver one yen is dated M3 only (vs. the lesser denominations bearing both M3 and M4 dates). The JNDA references four major types in its price guide. Krause refers to types I, II and III. The latter three types are distinguished by features of the yen character on the obverse including size of one stroke and completeness of another part of the character. The JNDA divides the first type into sub categories as well depending on rim/no rim variety.

This coin is the basic type one, but is a rather lustrous example and has a few interesting die cracks.

The gold 1 yen was the basic monetary unit established under the Meiji restoration. The silver yen was intended for use in treaty ports and were not initially to have circulated outside these areas. This was changed by a later coinage act and the silver yen coins became legal tender throughout Japan (though of a differing design by then) until the silver yen coin was demonetized for domestic use.

Diameter is 38.58 mm, 0.900 fine silver, weight of 26.96 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 1 rin, copper, 1873-1884 JAPAN RIN M6(1873) NGC MS 64 RB JNDA 01-55. The 1 rin is the smallest denomination of the Meiji era coinage. It is valued at 1/10 of a sen, or 1/1000 of a yen. It was struck for a limited number of years, spanning dates from M6 (1873) to M17 (1884), but not continuously and several dates are quite scarce .

Diameter 15.75 mm, copper alloy, weight 0.91 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 1/2 sen, square scales, 1873-1877 JAPAN 1/2S M7(1874) NGC MS 65 RB JNDA 01-53. The half sen was minted non-continuously from M6 (1873) through M21 (1888). The denomination has two basic styles, with the earlier style having a dragon with 'squared' appearing scales. Later issues have a 'sharp' scale style with one year overlapping with both styles (year 10/1877). Year 7 has two varieties--this one with a thinner loop to the dragon's body, vs. a thicker loop as seen earlier in the year and in year 6.

22.2 mm diameter, copper, 3.56 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 1 sen, square scales, 1873-1877 JAPAN SEN M8(1875) NGC MS 65 RB JNDA 01-46. The sen is valued at 1/100 of the yen. The inscription across the top of the reverse translates to '100 pieces in exchange for 1 yen'.

Like the half sen, the full sen was minted non-continuously from M6 (1873) through M21 (1888). The denomination has two basic styles, with the earlier style having a dragon with 'squared' appearing dragon scales. Later issues have a 'sharp' scale style but without an overlapping year as seen in the 1/2 sen.

Diameter 27.87 mm, copper, weight 7.13 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 2 sen, square scales, 1873-1877 JAPAN 2S M7(1874) NGC MS 65 RB JNDA 01-45. As with the smaller copper dragon minors there can either square or 'v' shaped scales on the 2 sen dragon depending on the year, with the square being the earlier version. The 2 yen transitions between rounded vs. squared scales during year 10 (1877), with the squared version being the more rare.

31.81 mm diameter, copper, weight 14.26 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 5 sen, dragon, 1873-1880 JAPAN 5S M9(1876) CHARACTERS SEPARATED NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-35. The design retains the dragon obverse of the inaugural year but the reverse now features a large character denomination with the chrysanthemum crest and the paulownia/chrysanthemum wreath.

4 of the 6 years having significant varieties depending on the Meiji characters and/or the sen characters. The Meiji character variants are either connected or separated. The sen character variants show differences an upstroke. The JNDA illustration for this makes it appear as though the upstroke is either absent vs. fully connected, though I've seen (as seen with this example) a smaller upstroke without being 'connected'.

M. 6 (1873): 'Meiji' character variants
M. 7 (1874): no varieties listed
M. 8 (1875): 'Sen' character variants
M. 9 (1876): both 'Meiji' and 'Sen' character variants (4 types)
M. 10 (1877): 'Meiji' character variant, but a slightly different one than years 6 and 9
M. 13 (1880): Mintage of 79 coins and not easibly collectable

Diameter 15.15 mm, .800 fine silver, weight 1.35 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 10 sen, dragon, 1873-1906 JAPAN 10S M20(1887) NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-24. The second design for the 10 sen coin (consistent with the other silver denominations) retains the dragon obverse and changes the reverse to a large character denomination with a crest+wreath design. The 10 sen is dated (non-continuously) from M6 (1873) - M39 (1906), with several years either skipped, produced only for exhibitions, or otherwise with severely restricted mintages.

Diameter 17.57 mm, 0.800 fine silver, weight 2.7 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 20 sen, dragon, 1873-1905 JAPAN 20S M20(1887) NGC MS 66 JNDA 01-22. The dragon obverse with large character denomination/crest/wreath motif was minted from M6(1873)- M38 (1905)--non continuously and with a few exhibition only or otherwise severely limited mintages.

23.5 mm diameter, 0.800 fine silver, 5.39 grams
View Coin Meiji, 50 sen, dragon, 1873-1905 JAPAN 50S M6(1873) LONG YEAR NGC MS 65 JNDA 01-14. Dragon obverse, with denomination+crest+wreath reverse. The year M6 (1873) has variants based on the length of stroke on the nen/year character. This coin is labeled 'long' by NGC, but is really the more common short stroke variant.

30.90 mm diameter, 0.800 fine silver, weight 13.48 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 1 yen, new type large, 1874-1887 JAPAN YEN M15(1882) NGC AU 58 JNDA 01-10. This is the 'large size' successor to the initial silver yen design. As with all the silver denominations after 1871, the reverse has been modified by dropping the rising sun motif and has a new large character denomination with a chrysanthemum crest and a paulownia and chrysanthemum foliage wreath. Varieties of certain dates exist. The coins are dated M7(1874) through M20 (1887). Not all years are represented and both year 19 and 20 have size differences.

38.6 mm diameter (with an exception), 0.900 silver, weight 26.96 grams.
Meiji, Trade Dollar, dragon+denomination, 1875-1877 JAPAN T$1 M8(1875) JNDA 01-12. Minted from M8 (1875)- M10 (1877). The trade dollar was minted to the standard of 420 grains (as indicated on the coin itself) vs. the 416 grains in the 1 yen coin. The reverse characters translate to 'trade silver'. This coin has not yet been graded, and would receive a details grade given the cleaning. In hand the cleaning is less obvious, but is clearly present.

Diameter 38.58 mm, 0.900 fine silver, weight 27.22 grams.
Meiji, 1 yen, gin left, 1870-1896 JAPAN YEN M30(1897) GIN COUNTERSTAMP (1897) JNDA 01-10B/C.

10B refers to a gin marked coin of the larger diameter yen and 10C for the smaller. My two gin marked coins are not graded as they are harshly cleaned examples. This is an example of the left placed mark, indicating it was done in Osaka.

10B: Diameter 38.6 mm, 0.900 fine, 26.96 grams.
10C: Diameter 38.1 mm, 0.900 fine, 26.96 grams

—Gin marked coins—

The gin mark is a stamp with the character that literally means ‘gin’ or ‘silver’. The mark was placed on the reverse of the silver one yen coin either to the left or right of the denomination. Mark location was determined by which mint placed the mark (Osaka on the left, Tokyo to the right).

The JNDA gives a specific catalog number for the gin stamped coins. The diameter, weight, and silver content remain the same as the base coin. Coins that would otherwise be 01-10 (larger diameter yen) are now 01-10B, and the 01-10A (smaller diameter silver yen/same silver content) are designated 01-10C. Unlike chop marks, these mint applied marks are not considered ‘post mint damage’ and may only marginally affect the value to collectors (individual collector preferences may vary).

Japan was initially and nominally on the gold standard with the inception of the Meiji era modern yen based coinage, with the gold yen consisting of 1.5 grams of gold. The silver yen was adopted initially for trade but was subsequently used domestically as well. The government set the exchange rate between the two by decree given gold and silver supplies of the time. Over the years silver became the functional standard.

However, as silver became more plentiful, the value of the metal content in the silver one yen coin did not keep pace with the value of the gold, thus resulting in a large outflow of gold from the country as foreigners would trade cheap silver for gold.

In year 30 this disparity resulted in a new return to the gold standard by governmental decree. The gold yen was now reduced to .75 grams and silver yen were to be withdrawn from circulation over a designated period. (This new standard effectively doubled the value of the old style gold coins, while devaluing the silver). The silver coins were allowed to be exchanged back at the new, lower, gold yen standard through April in year 31.

The newly traded in silver yen coins were either melted or were sold to other nations as a functional trade dollar. To prevent the sold coins from being returned and traded back multiple times the coins were stamped with the ‘gin’ mark to indicate they were previously exchanged.

Interestingly the silver one yen coin was brought back and minted starting in Meiji year 34 but purely for non-domestic usage so no ‘gin’ mark would be placed on a coin from M34 on. The silver yen coin remained demonetized domestically. And, despite ‘one yen of gold’ being standardized, no coin was made with the new weight standard (perhaps due to technical challenges of such a small coin, but I speculate).
Meiji, 1 yen, gin right, 1870-1896 JAPAN YEN M29(1896) GIN COUNTERSTAMP (1897) JNDA 01-10B/C.

10B refers to a gin marked coin of the larger diameter yen and 10C for the smaller. My two gin marked coins are not graded as they are harshly cleaned. This is an example of the right side placed mark, indicating it was done in Tokyo.

10B: Diameter 38.6 mm, 0.900 fine, 26.96 grams.
10C: Diameter 38.1 mm, 0.900 fine, 26.96 grams

—Gin marked coins—

The gin mark is a stamp with the character that literally means ‘gin’ or ‘silver’. The mark was placed on the reverse of the silver one yen coin either to the left or right of the denomination. Mark location was determined by which mint placed the mark (Osaka on the left, Tokyo to the right).

The JNDA gives a specific catalog number for the gin stamped coins. The diameter, weight, and silver content remain the same as the base coin. Coins that would otherwise be 01-10 (larger diameter yen) are now 01-10B, and the 01-10A (smaller diameter silver yen/same silver content) are designated 01-10C. Unlike chop marks, these mint applied marks are not considered ‘post mint damage’ and may only marginally affect the value to collectors (individual collector preferences may vary).

Japan was initially and nominally on the gold standard with the inception of the Meiji era modern yen based coinage, with the gold yen consisting of 1.5 grams of gold. The silver yen was adopted initially for trade but was subsequently used domestically as well. The government set the exchange rate between the two by decree given gold and silver supplies of the time. Over the years silver became the functional standard.

However, as silver became more plentiful, the value of the metal content in the silver one yen coin did not keep pace with the value of the gold, thus resulting in a large outflow of gold from the country as foreigners would trade cheap silver for gold.

In year 30 this disparity resulted in a new return to the gold standard by governmental decree. The gold yen was now reduced to .75 grams and silver yen were to be withdrawn from circulation over a designated period. (This new standard effectively doubled the value of the old style gold coins, while devaluing the silver). The silver coins were allowed to be exchanged back at the new, lower, gold yen standard through April in year 31.

The newly traded in silver yen coins were either melted or were sold to other nations as a functional trade dollar. To prevent the sold coins from being returned and traded back multiple times the coins were stamped with the ‘gin’ mark to indicate they were previously exchanged.

Interestingly the silver one yen coin was brought back and minted starting in Meiji year 34 but purely for non-domestic usage so no ‘gin’ mark would be placed on a coin from M34 on. The silver yen coin remained demonetized domestically. And, despite ‘one yen of gold’ being standardized, no coin was made with the new weight standard (perhaps due to technical challenges of such a small coin, but I speculate).
View Coin Meiji, 1/2 sen, v-shaped scales, 1877-1888 JAPAN 1/2S M18(1885) NGC MS 66 RB JNDA 01-53. The half sen was minted non-continuously from M6 (1873) through M21 (1888). The denomination has two basic styles, with the earlier style having a dragon with 'squared' appearing scales. Later issues have a 'sharp' scale style with one year overlapping with both styles (year 10/1877).

22.2 mm diameter, copper, weight 3.56 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 1 sen, v-shaped scales, 1880-1888 JAPAN SEN M21(1888) NGC MS 65 RB JNDA 01-46. The sen is valued at 1/100 of the yen. The inscription across the top of the reverse translates to '100 pieces in exchange for 1 yen'.

Like the half sen, the full sen was minted non-continuously from M6 (1873) through M21 (1888). The denomination has two basic styles, with the earlier style having a dragon with 'squared' appearing dragon scales. Later issues have a 'sharp' scale style but without an overlapping year as seen in the 1/2 sen. The JNDA catalog number is the same for both styles.

27.87 mm diameter, copper, weight 7.13 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 1 sen, sun, 1898-1902 JAPAN SEN M34(1901) NGC MS 66 RB JNDA 01-47. After a 10 year hiatus the 1 sen denomination returned with a rising sun obverse and a rice stalk wreath+denomination reverse. The content shifted from copper to a bronze alloy while otherwise retaining size and weight of the preceding sen coin. The coins were minted in both the Meiji and Taisho eras.

This slot is the Meiji version of the coin, which was minted from M31(1898) - M35 (1902).

Diameter is 27.87 mm, bronze, weight 7.13 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 2 sen, v-shaped scales, 1877-1884 JAPAN 2S M15(1882) NGC MS 63 BN JNDA 01-45. As with the smaller copper dragon minors there can either square or 'v' shaped scales on the dragon depending on the year, with the square being the earlier version. The 2 yen transitions between rounded vs. squared scales during year 10 (1877), with the squared version being the more rare.

31.81 mm, copper, weight 14.26 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 5 sen, chrysanthemum, 1889-1897 JAPAN 5S M22(1889) NGC MS 66 JNDA 01-36. Large character obverse, chrysanthemum reverse. The small silver 5 sen has been abandoned in favor of a somewhat larger, base metal coin. The final year of the design overlaps the first year of its successor.

Diameter 20.60 mm, cupronickel, weight 4.67 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 5 sen, rice stalks, 1897-1905 JAPAN 5S M34(1901) NGC MS 65 JNDA 01-37. A rising sun obverse and a large characters+rice stalk wreath reverse. There is overlap in the first year of mintage with the prior design. The coin specifications (content, weight, and diameter) remain unchanged.

Diameter 20.6 mm, cupronickel, weight 4.67 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 10 sen, sun small, 1906-1912 (album printing error, should be 1907) JAPAN 10S M44(1911) NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-25. Minted from M40 (1907)- T6 (1917). Starting in 1907 the dragon obverse has been replaced with the rising run obverse. The diameter is the same but the weight and fineness have been reduced vs. the prior dragon style.

Diameter 17.57 mm, 0.720 fine silver, weight 2.25 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 20 sen, sun small, 1906-1911 JAPAN 20S M41(1908) NGC MS 66 JNDA 01-22. The dragon obverse has been replaced with the rising sun. Where the 10 sen reduced fineness and weight but retained diameter, the 20 sen retained the original fineness but diameter and weight are reduced. This was the final 20 sen coin minted.

Diameter 20.30, 0.800 fine silver, weight 4.05 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 50 sen, sun, 1906-1912 JAPAN 50S M39(1906) NGC MS 65 JNDA 01-15. The dragon motif obverse is now replaced with the rising sun. This style spanned two eras and was minted from M39 (1906) - T6 (1917). The style is reduced in diameter/weight vs its predecessor.

Diameter 27.27 mm, 0.800 fine silver, weight 10.13 grams.
View Coin Meiji, 1 yen, new type small, 1887-1912 JAPAN YEN M36(1903) NGC MS 65 JNDA 01-10A. The silver 'new type' one yen with the dragon obverse and denomination reverse now reduced in diameter, though the weight and fineness is the same as its predecessor--which is fitting in its role as a coin intended for international trade. This is the final type of silver one yen produced, extending from the Meiji era to a single year of production in the Taisho era.

Diameter 38.1mm, 0.900 fine silver, weight 26.96 grams.
View Coin Taisho, 1 sen, sun, 1913-1915 JAPAN SEN T4(1915) NGC MS 65 RD JNDA 01-47. After a 10 year hiatus the 1 sen denomination returned combining the rising sun obverse and a rice stalk wreath+denomination reverse. The content shifted from copper to a bronze alloy while otherwise retaining size/weight of the preceding sen coin. The coins were minted in both the Meiji and Taisho eras.

This slot is the Taisho version of the coin, which was minted for only three years (T2-T4).

Diameter is 27.87 mm, bronze alloy, weight 7.13 grams.
View Coin Taisho, 5 sen, holed large, 1917-1920 JAPAN 5S T9(1920) LARGE SIZE NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-38. The 'large size' holed cupronickel coin was minted from T6-T9 (1917-1920) and features several design elements commonly encountered on Japanese coins. The obverse has the center hole surrounded by the shape of 'the sacred mirror' which is one of the Imperial Treasures. Above the hole is the phrase which translates to 'Great Japan' and below is the year. This is superimposed upon a stylized wave design reminiscent some of the much older coinage. The reverse has the chrysanthemum crest (the Imperial Seal) centered between the denomination characters. Below is foliage of the paulownia (which represents the government).

The coin design was later reduced in size while maintaining the same features.

Diameter 20.60 mm, cupronickel alloy, weight 4.28 grams.
View Coin Taisho, 10 sen, sun, 1912-1917 JAPAN 10S T6(1917) NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-25. The dragon obverse has been replaced with the rising sun motif. The diameter is the same but the weight and fineness have been reduced vs. the dragon style. This is one of several examples where the main catalog (JNDA) does not distinguish category, but the album has a separate entry due to the change in the reigning Emperor.

Diameter 17.57 mm, 0.720 fine silver, weight 2.25 grams.

View Coin Taisho, 50 sen, sun, 1912-1917 JAPAN 50S T5(1916) NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-15. The dragon motif obverse has been replaced with the rising sun. This style spanned two eras and was minted from M39 (1906) - T6 (1917). The style is reduced in diameter and weight vs its predecessor.

Diameter 27.27 mm, 0.800 fine silver, weight 10.13 grams.
View Coin Taisho, 1 yen, new type, 1914 JAPAN YEN T3(1914) NGC MS 64 JNDA 01-10A. The silver 'new type' one yen with the dragon obverse and denomination reverse but a now reduced diameter vs. its predecessor. The weight and silver content remain the same. This is the final type of silver one yen produced, extending from the Meiji reign and includes this single year of production in the Taisho era. The coins were intended for overseas use only and were not monetized for domestic use.

Diameter 38.1mm, 0.900 fine silver, weight 26.96 grams.
View Coin Taisho, 5 rin, bronze paulownia, 1916-1919 JAPAN 5R T5(1916) NGC MS 67 RD JNDA 01-54. The 5 rin had a very short lifespan, being minted only four years (Taisho 5-Taisho 8. 1916-1919). One rin is 1/10 of a sen, so the 5 rin was the updated version of the previously discontinued 1/2 sen coin.

Diameter 18.78 mm, bronze alloy, weight 2.10 grams.
View Coin Taisho, 1 sen, bronze paulownia, 1916-1924 JAPAN SEN T5(1916) NGC MS 66 RD JNDA 01-48. The Paulownia sen was minted non-continuously from Taisho 5 through Showa 13. The obverse features the issuing authority (Dai Nippon or Great Japan) with the paulownia leaf and the date below. The reverse has the denomination and a stylized scrolling design.

Diameter 23.03 mm, bronze alloy, weight 3.75 grams.
View Coin Taisho, 5 sen, holed small, 1920-1923 JAPAN 5S T11(1922) NGC MS 66 JNDA 01-39. This is the smaller or reduced version of the earlier coin. T9 (1920) has examples of both the large and small types. The design elements are identical other than size.

The obverse has the shape of the 'Sacred Mirror' (one of the Imperial Treasures) surrounding the center hole, with 'Great Japan' (Dai Nippon) above and the regnal date below. The characters are superimposed on a wave-like background which recalls some of the pre-modern coins. The reverse features the chrysanthemum crest (the Imperial Crest or Seal) above the center hole, with the denomination characters to either side. Below is foliage from the paulownia (the Paulownia Crest representing the government).

This coin was minted for four years of the Taisho era and a single Showa year (after a 9 year gap).

Diameter 19.09, cupronickel, weight 2.63 grams.
View Coin Taisho, 10 sen, holed, 1920-1926 JAPAN 10S T12(1923) NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-27. Minted in both the Taisho and Showa eras, the 10 sen has the same design as the contemporary 5 sen. The center hole of the obverse is surrounded by the 'Sacred Mirror' emblem, which is one of the Imperial treasures. The phrase 'Dai Nippon' or 'Great Japan' is above the hole, and under the hole is the regnal date. The reverse shows the Chrysanthemum crest (the Imperial Seal) above the hole with the denomination below. Underneath is foliage of the paulownia (the Paulownia represents the government).

The coin was minted from T9 (1920) - S7 (1932) non-continuously.

Diameter 22.17, cupronickel, weight 3.75 grams.
View Coin Taisho, 50 sen, phoenix, 1922-1926 JAPAN 50S T13(1924) NGC MS 66 JNDA 01-17. The Rising Sun/Double Hō-ō (Hoo, Ho-o, Ho-ho) 50 sen is the last silver coin minted for general circulation until after the war (at that point silver was found in coins of a much higher denomination). By this date the silver content is significantly less than the original 50 sen coin requirements. Minting of these occurred in both the Taisho and Showa eras.

The Rising Sun encircled by the Sacred Mirror are emblems associated with the Sun Goddess, and thus the Imperial family. The hō-ō bird is often referred to as a phoenix, however it is distinct from the Western idea. The legend is that the bird appears when a boy destined to be Emperor is born, at the beginning of a new era, and/or during peace and prosperity. It is very specifically an emblem referring to the Imperial family.

The double hō-ō 50 sen can be found anywhere from blast white to spectacularly toned, as is this specimen.

Diameter 23.50 mm, .720 fine silver, weight 4.95 grams.
View Coin Showa, 1 sen, bronze paulownia, 1927-1938 JAPAN SEN S13(1938) PAULOWNIA CREST BRONZE NGC MS 65 RB JNDA 01-48. The Paulownia sen was minted non-continuously from Taisho 5 through Showa 13. The obverse features the issuing authority (Dai Nippon or Great Japan) with the paulownia leaf and the date below. The reverse has the denomination and a stylized scrolling design.

S13 (1938) is an unusual year as this was the first of three differing 1 sen designs.

Diameter 23.03 mm, bronze alloy, weight 3.75 grams
View Coin Showa, 5 sen, small size, 1932 JAPAN 5S S7(1932) NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-39. This is a smaller or reduced version of the prior 5 sen. There were coins minted for 4 years in the Taisho era (ending a 4 year run in T12 (1923). After a 9 year gap there was a single year minted in S7 (1932).

The design elements are identical to the prior Taisho era coins, with this continuing the small size version. The obverse has the shape of the 'Sacred Mirror' (one of the Imperial Treasures) surrounding the center hole. 'Great Japan' (Dai Nippon) is above, and the regnal date is below, and these are superimposed on a wave-like background. The reverse features the chrysanthemum crest above the center hole (which is the Imperial Crest/Seal), with the denomination characters to either side. Below is foliage from the paulownia (the Paulownia Crest represents the government).

Diameter 19.09, cupronickel alloy, weight 2.63 grams.
View Coin Showa, 10 sen, holed cupronickel, 1927-1932 JAPAN 10S S2(1927) NGC MS 64 JNDA 01-27. Minted in both the Taisho and Showa eras. The 10 sen has the same design as the contemporary 5 sen. The center hole of the obverse is surrounded by the 'Sacred Mirror' emblem, which is one of the Imperial treasures. The phrase 'Dai Nippon' or 'Great Japan' is above the hole, and under the hole is the date, and these are superimposed on a wave-like background. The reverse shows the Chrysanthemum crest (the Imperial Seal) above the hole with the denomination below. Underneath is foliage of the paulownia (the Paulownia represents the government).

The coin was minted from T9 (1920) - S7 (1932) non-continuously.

Diameter 22.17, cupronickel, weight 3.75 grams.
View Coin Showa, 50 sen, phoenix, 1928-1938 JAPAN 50S S9(1934) NGC MS 68 JNDA 01-17. The Rising Sun/Double Hō-ō (Hoo, Ho-o, Ho-ho) 50 sen is the last silver coin minted for general circulation until after the war (at which point silver was found in coins of a much higher denomination). By this date the silver content is significantly less than the original 50 sen coin requirements. Minting of these occurred in both the Taisho and Showa eras.

The Rising Sun encircled by the Sacred Mirror are emblems associated with the Sun Goddess, and thus the Imperial family. The hō-ō bird is often referred to as a phoenix, however it is distinct from the Western idea. The legend is that the bird appears when a boy destined to be Emperor is born, at the beginning of a new era, and/or during peace and prosperity. It is very specifically an emblem referring to the Imperial family.

The double hō-ō 50 sen can be found anywhere from blast white to spectacularly toned.

Diameter 23.50 mm, .720 fine silver, weight 4.95 grams
________________________
Showa 9 (1934)
Mintage 20,003,995
Pop 10/0 (12/2018)
View Coin Showa, 1 sen, large crow brass, 1938 JAPAN SEN S13(1938) BIRD IN CLOUDS BRONZE NGC MS 66 RD JNDA 01-49. This is a one year issue and the second of three types of 1 sen for the year S13 (1938). The obverse features a crow while the reverse has the chrysanthemum design (Imperial Crest) at the top, with a wave pattern around the border. At the bottom is a paulownia leaf design (representing the government).

Diameter 23.03, brass, weight 3.75 grams.
View Coin Showa, 5 sen, holed bird, 1933-1937 JAPAN 5S S11(1936) NGC MS 66 JNDA 01-40. This coin features a rather martial theme, a reflection of the time. The obverse has an 8-lobed design representing the Sacred Mirror, which is associated with the Sun Goddess (and is one of the Imperial Treasures). The reverse is a representation of a bird known as the 'Golden Kite'. In mythology the Golden Kite assisted the first Emperor of Japan in battle by shining a bright light which either blinded his enemies or lead them astray and into defeat (as indicated by the rays that can be seen rising from the bird on the coin).

Diameter 19 mm, nickel, weight 2.80 grams.
View Coin Showa, 10 sen, holed nickel, 1933-1937 JAPAN 10S S11(1936) NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-28. A five year issue with the obverse featuring stylized waves with the issuing authority and date above and below the center hole. The reverse has the denomination with the chrysanthemum and paulownia symbols representing the Imperial family and the government respectively.

Diameter 22 mm, nickel, weight 4.02 grams.
View Coin Showa, 1 sen, aluminum crow, 1938-1940 JAPAN SEN S14(1939) NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-50. This is the third type of 1 sen minted in S13 (1938), now a much smaller aluminum coin rather than the preceding bronze and brass versions. The design mimics the second type of 1 sen, with the crow obverse/chrysanthemum-waves-paulownia reverse of the previous brass type. This type was only minted for three years.

This example is the second year (S14/1939) which has 2 varieties--which are not always noted on the slabs. The style of the 4 differs, with the more symmetrical/'squared off' style shown here being more common.

Diameter 17.60 mm, aluminum, weight 0.9 grams.
View Coin Showa, 5 sen, aluminum bronze, 1938-1940 (album printing error--NOT holed bird) JAPAN 5S S15(1940) ALUMINUM-BRONZE NGC MS 65 JNDA 01-41. A three year series. The obverse features a cherry blossom motif with issuing authority (Dai Nippon) above and the regnal date below. The reverse uses the chrysanthemum above (Imperial), paulownia foliage below (Government) and denomination to the sides of the center hole.

Diameter 19 mm, aluminum-bronze, weight 2.80 grams.
View Coin Showa, 10 sen, holed wave, 1938-1940 (album printing error--not bird) JAPAN 10S S14(1939) NGC MS 67 JNDA 01-29. A three year series from S13 (1938) - S15 (1940). The obverse has a double petaled cherry blossom surrounding the center hole, with a small paulownia crest to either side. The issuing authority (Dai Nippon/Great Japan) and regnal date are above/below the hole. The reverse has the chrysanthemum crest, with denomination and over a wave with sun rays.

Diameter 22 mm, aluminum-bronze, weight 4.00 grams.
View Coin Showa, 1 sen, Fuji, 1941-1943 JAPAN SEN S16(1941) PCGS MS 65 JNDA 01-51. A wartime issue, this small coin was part of the progression in minimizing metal content that could be diverted to the war efforts. The obverse is very simple with the kanji number one separating the 'Dai Nippon' above and date below. The reverse with Mount Fuji and the chrysanthemum above, denomination belown. Minted for three years, in the last year there was a reduction in weight.

Diameter 16 mm, aluminum. 0.65 grams, reduced to 0.55 grams during the last year. Both weights are available, with the reduced weight having a mintage of slightly more than half the full weighted version.
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