NGC Registry

Collection Manager >

Lusterrules So-Called Dollars

Category:  Token & Medals
Owner:  Lusterrules
Last Modified:  12/7/2021
Set Description
A collection of So-Called Dollars and related medals

Set Goals
My goal is to assemble a collection of So-Called Dollars and related medals that consists of attractive, quality examples no matter their grade. Many of the medals in my set are finest known or top pop examples, with the majority of the remaining medals that make up the set being within a point or two of top pop status. I have included large, high resolution photos as well as descriptions of each medal. In an effort to keep the set organized I have the medals listed by date first followed by HK number.

Slot Name
Origin/Country
Item Description
Full Grade
Owner Comments
Pics
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1854 NY HK-8 CRYSTAL PALACE NGC MS 63 This is a top pop example of a Crystal Palace medal. The NGC pop in MS-63 is 5/0. It is made of white metal and is well struck. The fields are much more reflective than they appear in the photos; in fact the whole medal looks much better in hand than the photos. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1854 NY HK-8A CRYSTAL PALACE NGC MS 64 BN This is a fabulous top pop 2/0 example of a bronze Crystal Palace SCD. It is very well struck, with all design details sharp & crisp. The surfaces, especially the obverse, are clean and are a pleasing dark chocolate hue with very nice glossy luster. The bronze Crystal Palace medals are much rarer than the white metal pieces. According to the NGC census, they have only graded a total of 4 bronze examples compared to 67 of those made of white metal. The overall rarity is R8 (5-10 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1859 NY HK-589A NASSAU WATER WORKS NGC MS 63 BN This medal just oozes originality. It looks like it was stored in a paper flip and remained untouched since 1859. It was struck in bronze to commemorate the opening of the Nassau Water Works; the first municipal pumping station built to supply clean water to the city of Brooklyn, New York. The surfaces are semi proof like and problem free with a pleasing dark brown patina. The NGC pop in MS-63 is 3/2. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1860 HK-9 HEENAN-SAYERS BOXING HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP NGC MS 65 BN On April 17th, 1860, one of the most famous bare-knuckle heavy-weight championship bouts took place at Farnborough in Hampshire, England between American John C. Heenan and World Champion Thomas Sayers of England. The fight lasted for 42 rounds and over two hours before the police, who had arrived to put a stop to the fight, were seen approaching from the edge of the field where the bout was being held. This caused everyone in attendance including Heenan & Sayers to flee the scene and the bout to be declared a draw. Upon Heenan’s return to America, medals were struck to commemorate the event by Smith and Hartmann of New York City. One of the medals featured a bust of Heenan on the obverse, and the other Sayers. Both shared the same reverse and each type was struck in both white metal and copper. This piece is a copper example of the Heenan medal. Its strike, surfaces and color are all excellent. It is 1 of only 10 that have been graded by NGC, and at MS-65 it is tied with 1 other example for the title of finest known. The overall rarity is R7 (11-20 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1860 HK-10A HEENAN-SAYERS BOXING HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP NGC MS 62 On April 17th, 1860, one of the most famous bare-knuckle heavy-weight championship bouts took place at Farnborough in Hampshire, England between American John C. Heenan and World Champion Thomas Sayers of England. The fight lasted for 42 rounds and over two hours before the police, who had arrived to put a stop to the fight, were seen approaching from the edge of the field where the bout was being held. This caused everyone in attendance including Heenan & Sayers to flee the scene and the bout to be declared a draw. Upon Heenan’s return to America, medals were struck to commemorate the event by Smith and Hartmann of New York City. One of the medals featured a bust of Heenan on the obverse, and the other Sayers. Both shared the same reverse and each type was struck in both white metal and copper. This piece is a white metal example of the Sayers medal. It is 1 of only 11 that have been graded by NGC and at MS-62 (1/0) it is the top pop non proof like example. Only 1 MS-63 PL example has been graded higher. The overall rarity is R7 (11-20 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1860 HK-10B HEENAN-SAYERS BOXING HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP NGC MS 64 BN On April 17th, 1860, one of the most famous bare-knuckle heavy-weight championship bouts took place at Farnborough in Hampshire, England between American John C. Heenan and World Champion Thomas Sayers of England. The fight lasted for 42 rounds and over two hours before the police, who had arrived to put a stop to the fight, were seen approaching from the edge of the field where the bout was being held. This caused everyone in attendance including Heenan & Sayers to flee the scene and the bout to be declared a draw. Upon Heenan’s return to America, medals were struck to commemorate the event by Smith and Hartmann of New York City. One of the medals featured a bust of Heenan on the obverse, and the other Sayers. Both shared the same reverse and each type was struck in both white metal and copper. This piece is a copper example of the Sayers medal. Its surfaces exhibit a pleasing original brown copper color, most likely from long term storage in a paper envelope. It has been graded MS-64 and is 1 of only 8 that have been graded by NGC. Only 1 has been graded higher at MS-65. The overall rarity is R7 (11-20 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 (c.1860) HK-133C BRANDYWINE/GERMANTOWN MONMOUTH & STONY POINT NGC MS 64 This medal honors Major General Anthony Wayne of the Continental Army on its obverse and commemorates the Revolutionary War Battles of Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth and Stony Point on its reverse, all of which Wayne commanded. At the Battle of Stony Point Wayne led a daring nighttime bayonet attack against the British which resulted in about 550 British prisoners taken. Wayne received a medal from the Continental Congress for his victory and earned the nickname ‘Mad Anthony’ from his men as a term of endearment for his bravery. This medal is made of brass and is 1 of only 8 that NGC has graded. At MS-64 (3/0) it is a top pop example. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 (c.1860) HK-133D BRANDYWINE/GERMANTOWN MONMOUTH & STONY POINT NGC MS 62 PL This Battles of Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth & Stony Point medal is listed as being made of tin and has been graded MS-62PL by NGC. It is 1 of only 8 that they have graded and is the only proof like example. Only 1 has been graded higher at MS-63. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 (c.1861-65) HK-829 AARON WHITE SATIRICAL $ NGC MS 64 RB During the civil war, hard money (gold & silver coins) became so scarce that the U.S. government needed to print large amounts of paper money to finance the war effort. Aaron White was a lawyer from Connecticut who believed that the printing of paper money without the gold & silver to back it would eventually lead to the bankruptcy of the United States. He had this medal struck as a satirical piece to show his belief that paper money was worthless. This medal is made of copper and has a strong strike, great luster and gorgeous color. The NGC pop in MS-64RB is 4 with only 2 higher, both at MS-65. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 (c.1863) HK-875 THE LOYAL NATIONAL LEAGUE NGC MS 63 BN The Loyal National League was an organization formed by patriotic northerners to strengthen loyalty to the north and fight back against the propaganda that was being put out at the time by a group sympathetic to the south called the Copperhead movement. This medal is made of copper and is a warm, medium brown in color. It is sharply struck and has nice luster. It has been graded MS-63BN (1/0) by NGC and is the top pop example. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1869 HK-12 PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPLETE NGC MS 63 BN 496 of these medals were struck at the Philadelphia mint as part of their ‘Medal Series of the U.S. Mint’ to commemorate the completion of the Pacific Railway. This is a large (45mm), heavy and impressive medal. It is struck in bronze with a high relief design and its surfaces are a deep mahogany color and have an almost glass like sheen. The overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known), NGC has graded 28 of these medals, 8 of which were graded MS-63.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1870 MA HK-13 PILGRIM JUBILEE MEMORIAL PCGS MS 67 A stunningly monster toned example of a silver plated Pilgrim Jubilee Memorial SCD! As nice as the PCGS photos are, this piece really needs to be seen in person to fully appreciate its beautiful rainbow toning. Graded MS-67, it is the top pop (1/0) example in the PCGS pop report. The NGC census shows only one other MS-67 graded. Truly one of, if not the finest known example of this medal. The overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1875 MA HK-17 BATTLE OF LEXINGTON NGC MS 65 BN Struck in bronze by the U.S. mint to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Lexington. 200 were made and sold for $1 each at the time. This example is a deep, rich mahogany color. It has a strong strike and nice luster. It is in an older NGC holder which has quite a few small/fine scratches and scuff marks on it. They do not distract at all when looking at the medal in hand, but the enlarged photos make a lot of them look like they are on the medal when in fact they are not. The NGC census shows just 8 have been graded MS-65 with only 2 higher, both at MS-66. The overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-25 ROUNDED 6 - LIBERTY BELL US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION NGC MS 66 BN This is a well struck, rich chocolate brown example of a HK-25 Liberty Bell/Independence Hall Dollar rounded 6 variety. The fields are glass like and highly reflective when viewed under a light. It is struck in copper and is holed as made. In its assigned grade of MS-66 (2/0) it is tied with 1 other for the title of finest known example of the rounded 6 variety. The overall rarity is listed as R5 (76-200 known) for both the pointed 6 and rounded 6 varieties combined.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 (1876) PA HK-27 LIBERTY BELL DOLLAR US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION NGC MS 64 BN A very nice example of a Liberty Bell/Independence Hall Dollar that is struck in copper with the ‘Small Bell’ design. The surfaces are clean with sharp details and have a rich, deep cherry red tone. They are also quite lustrous. The NGC pop in MS-64 is 3/2. The overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 (1876) PA HK-28 LIBERTY BELL DOLLAR US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION NGC MS 63 This is a Liberty Bell/Independence Hall Dollar with the ‘Small Bell’ design. It is made of brass, has a strong strike, good luster and attractive original brass patina. It looks much nicer in hand than the enlarged photos depict. The NGC census shows a total of 9 examples graded with a MS-63 pop of 3 with only 1 higher. The overall rarity is R7 (11-20 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-32A LIBERTY BELL DOLLAR US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION NGC MS 64 BN This medal is struck in copper and has rich reddish brown surfaces with glossy luster. All design details are crisp and it is holed as made. NGC has graded only 5 of these medals. The MS-64 pop is 1 with 2 higher, both at MS65. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-35 LIBERTY BELL DOLLAR US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION NGC MS 66 BN This is an outstanding example of a medal that is quite rare. Its overall rarity is listed as R8 (5-10 known), however NGC has graded only 2 examples and PCGS none. It is made of copper and has a full, bold strike. The surfaces are mark free with a beautiful brown/red brown tone that flashes Iridescent shades of red, blue and purple when rotated under a light. Its luster is excellent. At MS-66 it is the finest known and most likely the nicest example of this medal in existence.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-40 INDEPENDENCE HALL DOLLAR US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION NGC MS 63 BN This is a beautiful example of a HK-40 Independence Hall Dollar. It is struck in copper and the surfaces are very glossy. When the medal is rotated under a light, shades of copper/red and blue flash up and dance in its cartwheel luster. I was unable to capture how the medal truly looks in hand due to glare. Only 6 of these medals have been graded by NGC. Graded MS-63BN, this medal is the highest graded brown example. Only 2 MS-64 red/brown examples have been graded higher. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-44 INDEPENDENCE HALL DOLLAR US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION Jeff Shevlin Collection NGC MS 63 DPL One of only five that have been graded by NGC and a top pop example, this medal is made of gilt (gold plated) and has beautiful deep proof like surfaces. It is Pedigreed to the Jeff Shevlin collection. An overall rarity of R7 (11-20 known) combined with its low number of certified examples make it a true rarity.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-54 LIBERTY SEATED DOLLAR US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION NGC MS 63 PL I am quite pleased to have been able to add this medal to my collection. It is one of only two examples that have been graded by any grading service. Both were graded by NGC and ironically both have been graded MS-63PL. It is made of gilt and has strong proof like fields that contrast nicely with its devices. The overall rarity is listed as R6 (21-75 known), but with only two examples graded one has to wonder if it might not actually be somewhat rarer than that.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-58 LIBERTY SEATED DOLLAR US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION NGC MS 63 PL Well struck with excellent luster and proof like surfaces, the eye appeal of this medal is outstanding. It is made of gilt and is a bright gold color. I was unable to capture its full beauty in my photos due to glare. The NGC pop in MS-63 Proof like is 2 with one higher at MS64 PL. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-75 DECLAR OF INDEPENDENCE US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION B-388A, G.LOVETT.SC. NGC MS 65 BN Iridescent shades of blue, red and orange adorn both the obverse and reverse of this medal. When the medal is rotated under a light the effect is beautiful, however I was unable to capture the iridescence in my photos. The surfaces also have a much smoother, glass like look to them then the photos depict. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known), however NGC has graded only 4 of these medals. The NGC pop in MS-65 is 2/0 making this example tied with one other for the title of finest known.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-79 DECLAR OF INDEPENDENCE US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION B-388B, G.LOVETT.SC. NGC MS 62 Although listed as being made of pewter in Hibler & Kappen’s So-Called Dollars an Illustrated Standard Catalog, all HK-79’s were actually struck in white metal. This variety of Declaration of Independence Dollar lacks the Demarest signature below the date on the obverse that is present on the similar HK-75 thru HK-77 medals. Graded MS-62, this piece is one of only two that have been graded by NGC and is a top pop example. It is also fully proof like; however, it was not noted on the holder’s label by NGC. The overall rarity is listed as R6 (21-75 known), but with a NGC population of only two, it seems obvious that problem free, gradable examples are likely rarer than R6.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-81 MAIN BUILDING US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION NGC MS 64 BN This medal is struck in copper and is one of medals known as an Exposition Building dollar. This one depicts the exposition's main building on the obverse. It has sharp details and the surfaces are smooth, with a pleasing milk chocolate tone. The NGC pop in MS-64 is 3 with none higher and a total of only 10 graded. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-82 MAIN BUILDING US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION NGC MS 62 This is the white metal version of HK-81. It is much more lustrous than it looks in the photos. Many of the examples of this medal seen are either ‘Detail’ graded which are not included in the census or unable to be graded due to environmental damage. The NCG census shows 17 graded as of 01/31/19 with the MS-62 pop being 6 with only 1 higher at MS-63. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-101 BATTLE OF HARLEM PLAINS LOVETT'S BATTLES OF 1776 LOVETT'S BATTLE OF 1776 NGC MS 64 DPL Number 4 in a series of medals that were issued by George Lovett to commemorate eight different battles that were fought during the Revolutionary War in 1776. After the Continental Army’s defeat on Long Island in August 1776, General Washington and his army was forced to retreat to Harlem Heights which was an area of high ground on northwestern Manhattan Island. Early on the morning of September 16, Washington was alerted that the British were advancing toward his position and immediately dispatched 150 men under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton to find and probe the British forces. Knowlton and his men were spotted by the British at daybreak, beginning a battle that lasted until the British broke off hostilities and pulled back their troops after running low on ammunition at 3 p.m. Lieutenant Colonel Knowlton was one of those killed on the American side. The battle was considered a victory for the Americans and was Washington’s first battlefield success of the war. Although today this battle is commonly known as the Battle of Harlem Heights due to General Washington and the Continental Army being camped there at the time, the actual fighting took place at Harlem plains. This medal commemorates the Battle of Harlem Plains and is made of white metal. It has a strong strike and excellent luster. The MS-64 deep proof like pop at NGC is 3/2. The overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-104 BATTLE OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN LOVETT'S BATTLES OF 1776 NGC MS 64 DPL Number 5 in a series of medals that were issued by George Lovett to commemorate eight different battles that were fought during the Revolutionary War in 1776. The Battle of Lake Champlain was fought on Oct. 11, 1776 and is considered one of the first battles ever fought by the United States Navy. The commander of the U.S. forces during the battle was Benedict Arnold. This example is struck in white metal. It has a strong strike and great luster. What looks like hairlines in the enlarged photos is actually die polish and is not distracting at all when looking at the medal in hand. The MS-64 deep proof like pop at NGC is 1 with only 1 higher. The overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-110 BATTLE OF FORT WASHINGTON LOVETT'S BATTLES OF 1776 NGC MS 64 DPL Number 7 in a series of medals that were issued by George Lovett to commemorate eight different battles that were fought during the Revolutionary War in 1776. Fort Washington was built along the highest point of Manhattan at the north end of the of the Island. Just across the Hudson, Fort Lee sat high atop the New Jersey Palisades enabling the two forts to rain deadly artillery fire down upon any British warships that tried to sail up the Hudson and pass between the two forts. In addition, British warships were unable to rise the elevation of their guns enough to present effective return fire upon the two forts due to their height above the Hudson. By November of 1776, Fort Washington was the last stronghold for the Continental Army on the Island of Manhattan, and British Lieutenant General William Howe planned to take it. On Nov. 16, 1776, Howe ordered an attack on Fort Washington from the north, east and west sides. The number of patriots within the fort numbered 3,000 and those defending the north side were initially able to put up strong resistance to the attack, but the southern and western defenses were unable to repel the attack and were quickly overwhelmed. The northern defenses soon followed, causing the forts commanding officer Colonel Robert Magaw to surrender. 59 Americans were killed during the fighting, and 2,837 were taken as prisoners of war by the British. The Battle of Fort Washington is considered one of the worst defeats for the Continental Army of the Revolutionary War. This medal is made of white metal and has a strong strike and excellent luster. What may look like hairlines in my enlarged photos is actually die polish and is not distracting at all when looking at the medal in hand. The MS-64 deep proof like pop at NGC is 1/2. The overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1876 PA HK-113 BATTLE OF TRENTON, NJ LOVETT'S BATTLES OF 1776 NGC MS 65 DPL Number 8 in a series of medals that were issued by George Lovett to commemorate eight different battles that were fought during the Revolutionary War in 1776. The Battle of Trenton was a pivotal battle for the Continental Army during the American Revolution. By December of 1776, the Continental Army had lost both Long Island and New York to the British and had to flee to Pennsylvania to regroup. The morale of the troops was extremely low and many of them, believing that the fight for America’s independence was futile were deserting. General George Washington knew that what was needed the most at this time was a decisive victory to show both the British and his own troops that the fight was not yet lost. Washington’s plan was a dangerous crossing of the icy Delaware River on the night of December 25-26, 1776 and a surprise attack on the morning of Dec. 26 against the Hessian forces camped in Trenton, New Jersey. The attack was a complete success and led to a second victory when the Continental army defeated The British at the Battle of Princeton a week later on January 3, 1777. These two victories led to the Continental army’s control of much of New Jersey and a renewed confidence among the Americans that they could win the war. This medal commemorates the Battle of Trenton. It is made of white metal, has a strong strike, and its surfaces are deep proof like. The MS-65 DPL pop at NGC is 1 with only 1 higher. The overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES BRONZE 1876 GW-899 BATTLE OF TRENTON LOVETT'S BATTLES OF 1776 NGC MS 63 BN This unlisted SCD is a rare medal. Only 10 were struck, with an estimated 5-7 surviving today. When George Lovett designed his Eight Battle Dollars he also designed a second obverse for each of the eight battle reverses. Hibler & Kappen later recognized Lovett’s Eight Battles Dollars with the first obverse in their ground breaking work So-Called Dollars an Illustrated Standard Catalog, but they did not include the much rarer second obverse pieces. This medal is made of bronze, has a good strike and nice luster. NGC has graded it MS-63BN, but unfortunately they have no info in their census on it. The overall rarity is R8 (5-10 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 (1876) HK-853 CONTINENTAL DOLLAR DICKESON COPY, COPPER NGC MS 64 BN A very pleasing example of a Dickeson continental dollar copper restrike. It is well struck and mark free to the naked eye. Faint light blue hues can be seen dancing up from beneath the smooth chocolate surfaces when the medal is rotated under a light. IMO it is conservatively graded. Overall rarity of R7 (11-20 known). In MS-64BN the NGC pop is 3 with only 2 higher.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 UNDATED HK-863A PERSEVERANDO DOLLAR DELOREY DICKESON-4 NGC MS 64 BN Although they are undated, it is generally believed that Professor Montroville Dickeson designed and issued Perseverando Dollars around the same time as his Continental Dollar restrikes in 1876. For the obverse design, he chose the same image that was used for the 1776 Continental Currency $6 bill. Two reverse designs were used. Both commemorate the meeting of the Second Continental Congress and list the amount of Continental Currency that was issued at the time, they differ only in the date that the currency was issued. This medal has the May 10, 1775 date on the reverse and is struck on a thick copper planchet. It has glossy surfaces over an even dark chocolate color. It is one of only 3 that have been graded by NGC and at MS-64BN it is a top pop example. The overall rarity is R7 (11-20 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 UNDATED HK-863A PERSEVERANDO DOLLAR DELOREY DICKESON-4 NGC MS 62 RB This medal was incorrectly attributed and both the holder it is in and the NGC census list it as a HK-863A when in fact it is a HK-863C Perseverando Dollar with the November 29, 1775 date on its reverse. It has been graded MS-62 Red/Brown and the NGC census does not list any other red/brown example of HK-863C as being graded which makes this piece the top pop example. It is beautifully toned, but unfortunately, I was not able to get photos of it that depict just how nice it actually is. In hand its surfaces are glossy, almost glass like and much brighter than they appear in my photos. Its color is a deep mint red that flashes purple when rotated under a light. The overall rarity is R7 (11-20 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 UNDATED HK-865B EAGLE & HERON DOLLAR DELOREY DICKESON-7 NGC MS 64 BN When Professor Dickeson designed his Eagle & Heron medals, he chose to use the same image of an eagle & heron fighting for the obverse that was used on the $3 bills issued by the Continental Congress in 1775. The legend above the two birds translates to “The End Is in Doubt”. Dickeson used the same two Continental Currency reverse designs that he used for his Perseverando Dollars for these medals as well. This medal has the Nov. 29, 1775 date on the reverse and is struck on a thick copper planchet. It is a beautiful example, with incredible detail exhibited in the feathers of the birds and a rich mahogany tone. Its surfaces have a glossy sheen which contribute to its excellent eye appeal. It has been graded MS-64 BN by NGC and is one of only 4 that they have graded. Only 1 has been graded higher at MS-65 BN. The overall rarity is R7 (11-20 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 (c.1877) HK-119A BATTLE OF SARATOGA NGC MS 65 BN What is commonly called the Battle of Saratoga was actually two separate battles that were fought 18 days apart. On Sept. 19th 1777 British Gen. John Burgoyne attacked American forces led by Gen. Horatio Gates & Benedict Arnold at Bemis Heights, NY. Although the British were victorious, the American forces fought well and made the British pay a toll by reducing their troop Strength. The British attacked again on Oct. 7, 1777, but were defeated and forced to retreat to Saratoga from where they surrendered ten day later. The British surrender at Saratoga led the French to decide to enter the war as an American ally and was a turning point in the war for American independence. This medal was issued by the Saratoga Monument Association. It is made of bronze and is well struck with semi proof like surfaces. It has beautiful color and is a very attractive piece. The NGC pop in MS-65 is 5/1. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1878 HK-120 WYOMING BATTLE & MASSACRE NGC MS 66 BN On July 3, 1778 British Colonel John Butler led a large group of British loyalists and Seneca Indians in an ambush of American militia men in Pennsylvania’s Wyoming valley. In a gruesome battle that lasted approximately 45 minutes, the British loyalists and Seneca Indians killed 360 of the American militia men. It was reported that 30 to 40 of the Americans who surrendered were tortured to death by the Indians. Colonel Butler himself reported that his force scalped 227 of the dead. As word of what had occurred spread, the battle became known as the Wyoming Massacre and Americans were outraged by the atrocities committed. A monument was built in 1833 over the site of a vault were remains of some of those who were killed in the massacre were interred. Beginning in 1878 and continuing every year since, ceremonies are held to commemorate the battle & massacre. This medal was struck for the first ceremony in 1878. It is made of bronze and the strike, luster and color are all fantastic! The NGC pop in MS-66 is 1 with only 1 example graded higher at MS-67. The overall rarity is R7 (11-20 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1878 HK-121 WYOMING BATTLE & MASSACRE NGC MS 63 DPL The white metal version of a Wyoming Battle & Massacre Centennial medal is a much harder medal to find than its listed overall rarity of R5 (76-200 known) would lead one to believe. This piece is a bright white and has highly reflective fields that contrast beautifully against its frosted devices. It is one of only three that have received the Deep Poof Like designation by NGC; and at MS-63 DPL, it is a top example.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1878 PA HK-137 VALLEY FORGE CENTENNIAL JEFF SHEVLIN COLLECTION NGC MS 65 BN This medal was designed by William Barber and struck to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the departure of the Continental Army from Valley Forge. It is pedigreed to the Jeff Shevlin collection. It is made of bronze and the surfaces are a rich milk chocolate color that adds greatly to its eye appeal. It is one of six examples that have been graded MS-65 by NGC, with only one other example graded higher at MS-66. The overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1879 HK-122 BATTLE OF STONY POINT JEFF SHEVLIN COLLECTION NGC MS 64 BN On July 16th 1779 Brigadier General Anthony Wayne of the continental army led the elite Corps of Light Infantry during a daring midnight attack against British forces who were garrisoned along the Hudson river at Stony Point, NY. The battle lasted only 25 minutes before the British surrendered and the victory was a great boost for the morale of the Continental forces. This medal is made of bronze and was struck to commemorate the centennial anniversary of the battle. It is pedigreed to the Jeff Shevlin collection. The surfaces are a glossy dark brown that especially on the obverse flash electric blue when rotated under a light. It is one of three that have been graded MS-64 by NGC with only two graded higher, one at MS-65 and one at MS-66. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1879 HK-122A BATTLE OF STONY POINT NGC MS 61 PL This is the white metal variety of the Battle of Stony Point Centennial medal. NGC has graded only eight examples of this medal and this piece at MS-61PL is one of only two that have received the proof like designation. Only one MS-63PL example has been graded higher. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES 34mm 1880 BRONZE CAPTURE OF ANDRE MONUMENT TARRYTOWN, NY NGC MS 66 BN During the American Revolution, John Andre was a British Major and the head of the British Secret Service in America. By September of 1780, Andre had been conspiring for some time with American General Benedict Arnold, who was the commander of West Point, to have Arnold surrender the fort and defect to the British in exchange for 20,000 British Pounds. On September 20, 1780, Andre sailed up the Hudson on the British warship Vulture to meet with Arnold and finalize the plans for how the British would take the fort. On September 21, the two men met in the woods below Stony Point to go over their plans. Meanwhile, the Vulture had been spotted in the Hudson and was under fire by two American Patriots. Andre and Arnold’s meeting lasted well into the night, and by morning the Vulture had sustained damage from cannon fire and was forced to flee downriver leaving Andre stranded on shore. To enable Andre’s escape through Continental lines, Arnold provided civilian clothes and papers allowing him to travel under a false name. Arnold also provided Andre with six pages, written in his own hand, that showed the British exactly how to take West Point. Andre rode south toward New York City unimpeded until the morning of September 23 when he came upon American militiamen John Paulding, Isaac Van Wart and David Williams near Tarrytown, NY. Andre’s answers to the militiamen’s questions aroused their suspicions, causing them to search him. Arnold’s hand written pages were found hidden in Andre’s stocking at which time Andre tired to bribe them with his horse and watch if they would let him go. The militiamen refused Andre’s bribe and took him prisoner. Benedict Arnold was able to defect to the British before Andre was caught and anyone knew of his treason. John Andre was found guilty as a spy on September 29, 1780 and sentenced to death. He was hung at Tappan, NY on October 2, 1780 after the British refused to surrender Arnold for Andre in a prisoner exchange. This medal commemorates the centennial of the capture of Andre by Paulding, Van Wart and Williams. It is made of bronze and has a great strike. Its color is a beautiful chocolate brown. It was not included in the HK reference book, but is shown on John Raymond’s web site as Unlisted So-Called Dollar #274 and it is considered rare. NGC has graded this medal NMS-66, but unfortunately, there is no population data listed in their census for this medal so I have no idea how many they may have graded or if any have been graded higher.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1881 HK-125 BATTLE OF GROTON HEIGHTS NGC MS 66 DPL The battle of Groton Heights was fought on September 6, 1781 when Brigadier General Benedict Arnold ordered a division of British forces under his command to assault Fort Griswold which was located on a hill overlooking the Thames River in Groton Connecticut. The fort was defended by small number (150 to 165) of American militia under the command of Colonel William Ledyard. Before moving on the fort, British Colonel Eyre sent a message to the Americans demanding that they surrender. Colonel Ledyard refused. Colonel Eyre then send another message warning that if he had to storm the fort he would give “no quarter” to its defenders, to which Colonel Ledyard replied “We will not give up the fort, let the consequences be what they may.” Upon receiving Colonel Ledyard’s second refusal of surrender, the British forces immediately began their assault on the fort. Although vastly outnumbered, the Americans were able to inflict significant damage to their attackers, including killing or seriously wounding a number of British officers. Eventually, the British were able to breach a gate and storm into the fort. Realizing that the fort had been penetrated, Colonel Ledyard ordered his men to cease fighting. A British officer then walked up to Colonel Ledyard and asked “Who commands this fort”. Colonel Ledyard replied “I did, but you do now” while offering his sword in surrender. The British officer took the sword from Ledyard’s hand and thrust it into Ledyard’s chest, killing him. A black American soldier named Lambo Latham then shot and killed the British officer who killed Colonel Ledyard. The remaining Americans who had already surrendered were then massacred by the British. The whole battle lasted 40 mins. and was the last major military encounter of the revolutionary war in the northern United States. This medal was issued by George Hampden Lovett to commemorate the centennial anniversary of the battle. It is made of white metal and is the plate medal used for HK-125 in So-Called Dollars: An Illustrated Catalog 2nd Edition. Graded MS-66 DPL (2/0) it is a top pop example. The overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1882 PA HK-140 PENN'S HOUSE & CITY HALL PENNSYLVANIA BICENTENNIAL EX. VIRGIL BRAND COLL. NGC MS 65 DPL In 1681, King Charles II of England granted a large tract of land to 37 year old William Penn as repayment for a loan that he owed to Penn’s late father. Penn immediately left England to set up a colony of mostly Quakers in his new land which he originally wanted to call Sylvania (Latin for woods), but King Charles II changed the name to Pennsylvania in honor of Penn’s late father. Penn sailed up the Delaware River and on September 1, 1682 landed in an area that today is New Castle, Delaware. Eventually, Penn sailed further up the Delaware and founded the city of Philadelphia. This medal was struck to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the founding of Pennsylvania. It is made of white metal and features a high relief bust of William Penn on the obverse and an ornately designed reverse depicting a winged woman and Penn’s house on one side and City hall on the other. It is pedigreed to the Virgil Brand collection and of the 34 examples of HK-140 that NGC has graded to date, this piece at MS-65 deep proof like is the finest known. The overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1882 PA HK-140A PENN'S HOUSE & CITY HALL PENNSYLVANIA BICENTENNIAL PENNSYLVANIA BICENTENNIAL NGC MS 66 BN Immaculate chocolate brown surfaces and highly reflective fields highlight this example of a Penn’s house & city hall SCD. It is struck in bronze with a high relief bust of William Penn on the obverse and ornately designed reverse featuring a winged woman, Penn’s house on one side and City hall on the other. Overall rarity of R5 (76-200 known). Total NGC pop of 13 with 2 graded MS-66 and only 1 higher at 67.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1882 PA HK-140B WILLIAM PENN - UNIFACE PENNSYLVANIA BICENTENNIAL NGC MS 65 BN This medal is a very, if not extremely rare uniface version of an 1882 Pennsylvania bicentennial medal. It shares the same obverse as HK-140, 140A, 141 & 141A, is made of bronze and is holed as made. Its surfaces are much more lustrous than they appear in my photos and exhibit beautiful chocolate brown color. It is not listed in either edition of Hibler & Kappen’s So-Called Dollars an Illustrated Standard Catalog, but was assigned the HK# 140B by NGC when it was submitted for grading. NGC graded this medal MS-65 and to my knowledge it is the only example that has been graded by any grading company.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1883 NY HK-134 HEADQUARTERS AT NEWBURGH PROCLAMATION OF PEACE NGC MS 66 BN Of all the locations that George Washington used as his headquarters during the revolutionary war, the Hasbrouck House in Newburgh, NY served as his headquarters for the longest period of time, from April of 1782 until August of 1783. This medal was struck to commemorate the centennial of Washington’s Proclamation of Peace which he issued on April 19, 1783 from the Hasbrouck House. It is made of bronze and has a nice chocolate hue. The devices are sharp and the fields are clean with nice luster. NGC has graded 10 of these medals and at MS-66 this is the finest known example. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1883 GA HK-595 GEORGIA SETTLEMENT SESQUI NGC MS 65 This spectacular example of a Georgia Settlement Sesquicentennial medal is made of white metal and is one of only 12 HK-595’s that have been graded by NGC. It is well struck and its surfaces exhibit deeply mirrored fields and highly frosted devices that scream “DEEP PROOF LIKE” all day, every day. While NGC has graded this medal MS-65 (1/0) making it the finest known example, for some reason they did not attribute it as deep proof like. At some point I’ll get around to sending it back to NGC for review. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known).
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1883 GA HK-595A GEORGIA SETTLEMENT SESQUI NGC MS 64 BN The surfaces of this medal are a rich mahogany brown color and are very clean. It is made of bronze and is sharply struck. The fields are quite glossy. The overall rarity is R6 (21-75 known), however the NGC censes shows a total of just 6 examples graded with the MS-64 pop being 2/2.
View Coin   UNITED STATES SC$1 1883 PA HK-597 GERMAN-AMERICAN BICENT. NGC MS 65 DPL Germantown, Pennsylvania, is an area that is rich in American history. During the American revolution it was the site of the Battle of Germantown in 1777, with the fighting raging along its main street and muskets being fired from house windows. On July 1, 1874 it was the site of the first known kidnapping for ransom in America when two young brothers, Charley (4 years old) & Walter Ross (6 years old) were abducted while playing in front of their family’s home. Walter would be found a few days later, but Charley was never seen again. Germantown was also where the first American bible was published. This medal was struck to commemorate the bicentennial of Germantown. It is made of white metal and holed as made. Its luster is outstanding and the deep proof-like surfaces add greatly to both its eye appeal and WOW factor. Graded MS-65 DPL with none higher, this piece is the finest known example. This overall rarity is R5 (76-200 known).
Page 1 of 8 (384 items)
Prev
[1]
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Next

To follow or send a message to this user,
please log in