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PASSION OF LUDWIG

Category:  World Coins
Owner:  Thalermaniac
Last Modified:  6/26/2020
  
Set Description
“...It is very difficult to be a King. One must awaken each morning and decide precisely what to do with that day. To be a supreme ruler implies that one must rule, and help the kingdom in some way (e.g. by building something, destroying something/someone, making new legislature, etc.) .....” While King Ludwig pondered what to do with his day, he suddenly learned that the Mint Cabinet Director wanted to see him. “Come in, Franzl!” gladly exclaimed Ludwig, approaching his old friend, numismatist and artist Franz Ignaz von Streber, “...show me what you have today!” The Mint Director coughed in confusion and opened a little box which he held in his hands. Ludwig looked inside and his heart nearly stopped; upon the black velvet lay his long time passion – a shiny new COIN. Engraved upon the coin was Ludwig himself, the King of Bavaria standing in his splendid coronation mantle, His Crown… the One King, Ruler, God – Ludwig felt sudden tears of joy welling in his eyes. Embracing the old friend, he said, “Beautiful, Franz! You are right - we need to see more of these coins! I wish for all to remember my Kingly majesty forever!”

Set Goals
Ludwig I ruled Bavaria from his coronation in 1825 until 1848, when he abdicated his throne in favor of his son, Maximilian. It is my opinion that he was one of the most interesting personae in German history. As a very intelligent and educated man, he assumed his role as a King with full responsibility and, arguably, great passion. He had a great many passions; he loved change, and imposing it, he loved women, art, science, Greece, architecture etc. – but his dearest passion of all was coins, of course! He adored seeing new coins, especially those displaying his portrait and great achievements as the King. He oversaw the production of many commemorative coins: more than any other Germanic ruler. Within this set I would like to tell you the flamboyant story of the great ruler, Ludwig I of Bayern, son of Maximilian I Joseph, Duke of Franconia, Duke of Swabia, Count Palatine of the Rhine, etc. Let the journey begin!

Slot Name
Origin/Country
Item Description
Full Grade
Owner Comments
Pics
View Coin Davenport 555 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria King Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1825 BAVARIA - CORONATION 555 NGC MS 61 ...King Ludwig brought the coin closer to his eyes, inspecting it carefully. "I do really look good in the mantle indeed...and the whole Coronation Ceremony was truly beautiful... this makes me feel like Napoleon....no, better yet, like God himself!!!! Napoleon....Since his defeat in the Battle of Leipzig, Napoleon surrendered his Emperorship and fled into exile, and it was not undeserved! For He so pompously marched into Berlin in that far-off year of 1807, and I will never forgive his treatment of the German Royal Family....Well, He did, however, knew how to array his palace in true magnificence! The man had taste... nonetheless - enough thinking of Napoleon... my beloved Bavaria needs a Real King, The German One!" ...The old Mint Director coughed in hesitation to interrupt the King's reveries: "Your Grace! Yesterday thy artist, Herr Stiller, approached me. It seems that your Grace ordered him to paint a portrait of thyself at the Coronation Ceremony, and He likes the image of the engraving upon this beautiful coin! He wishes to portray Thee as well in the kingly mantle with crown, Constitution, sceptre, and outstretched hand - it is perfect - I am not opposed to this - it will be a grandiose work of art of Thy Majesty, but He also wishes to add the Throne to the background... As I said, I do not disagree, but this Throne truly does resemble that of Napoleon, with its ornate form and lettering! I did not include the throne on the coin for a reason...." Putting a regal hand upon the shoulder of his old friend, The King exclaimed, "You are absolutely right, Franz! But you do know these painters, especially Herr Stiller - he is a Master and I do not wish to interfere in his work of art. Let him paint, for Napoleon is gone and art is eternal! Also, Napoleon knew the worth in this - if he enjoyed this style then my kingdom, and I too, shall enjoy it!"
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King Maximilian Joseph died on October 13, 1825. Ludwig arrived to the Munich only on October 18 from Bad Bruckenau and in the morning of the next day He took the Oath on the Constitution Book as a new ruler of the Bavaria. That was His words after the Coronation: " It is not easy to rule the Bavarian people, but after the King we lost it is not even possible....."


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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1825, CORONATION TALER.
Davenport 555, KM 720, Thun 49, AKS 112, J.31
Commemoration of Ludwig's I accession to the throne.
Obverse: Head fo Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: King in the mantle, Crown, Book of Law. TRITT DIE REGIERUNG DES LANDES AN, AM 13 OCTOBER1825 (Assumes the government of the country on October 13, 1825)
28.0600 g., 0.8680 Silver, 0.7830 oz. ASW.
Golden-bronze patina, uncirculated details.
View Coin Davenport 556 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria King Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1827 BAVARIA KM-723 556 PCGS MS 64 “....By the way, Franz, can you show me our regular coin, our good old Kronenthaler - do you have it with you,” said King Ludwig, looking at Franz Streber with smile on his face. “Of course, Your Majesty! Our best engraver, Johann Baptist Stiglmaier, did a great job portraying Your Grace on all Bavarian coins!!”. The Muenzecabinet Director opened another box with another coin inside. It was a large Kronenthaler with the profile of Ludwig on the obverse and the crown on reverse. The coin was just minted and even felt warm to the touch. The sunlight entering through the window sparkled and played on its mirror-edge surface. “So, what do you think about my hair- does it not look a little bit too messy?” exclaimed Ludwig, skeptically looking at his portrait. ” I love my French hairstyle, you know, it is part of my heritage - but do you think I should rearrange it, make it lookmore smooth or presentable?” Franz Streber shrugged his shoulders: ”Your Majesty! Your hair is our German Treasure, and we all love it! Plus your head looks great in its profile, at least much better than your father’s head did; at least you have more hair. Bavarians just love their Kings with their big haircuts - just remember your ancestors, Maximilian III Joseph, for example! Yes, we should keep your hair as is!” Ludwig looked overjoyed: “Great! Let’s not change it all! I love the design! I love the Crown! I love our legend ‘Just and Firm’! I love my Kingdom! I love myself!”
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1827, KRONENTALER
Davenport 556, KM 723, Thun 47, AKS 75, J.23
Regular issue Taler (Krone)
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG KOENIG VON BAYERN
Reverse: Crown within wreath, "GERECHT UND BEHARRLICH" (Just and firm)
Edge: BAYERISCHER KRONTHALER
29.5400 g., 0.8701 Silver, 0.8272 oz. ASW.
Mint state, cartwheel luster, clear mirror-like fields. Some tiny planchet flow on obverse. Rare in such a great condition.
View Coin Davenport 557 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1826 BAVARIA - UNIVERSITY 557 PCGS MS 62 One fine early morning, King Ludwig slowly strolled through his garden and thought to himself amid beautiful flowers and pristine Greek statues. “It seems like it is not a simple task to be a King. My entire nation expects great actions, and I must serve Bavaria! But what must be done? It must be a historic act, one to uplift the Kingdom and cement my role as a Great King to be held in reverence by future generations! Surely it is easier to be just the Crown Prince and have fun with scholarly colleagues at Landshut University, drinking, hugging young girls, declaiming poetry and discussing the academia of Aristotle.” Taking a deep breath, King Ludwig began to reminisce. “And furthermore, I had promised my old teacher Father Maximilian to aid him in the reorganization of my Alma Mater as soon as I attained the Kingship – so be it!” Ludwig retreated to his cabinet to compose a letter to Landshut.
By the time of the arrival of the old Minister, Ludwig had already prepared his plan of action. Coming together in the meeting room of the palace, Ludwig embraced his old professor Maximilian, the Count of Montgelas. “My dear friend, I am so glad you have come! Now we can discuss the bright future of our University. Recall that it is named proudly after my ancestor Ludwig the Wealthy of Bavaria-Landshut, and as Ludwig I of Bavaria, I am obligated to continue the educational mission of my father and great-grandfather! Tell me, old friend, what is your vision of the future of our University?” exclaimed Ludwig in his excitement. The old Minister Maximilian arose with tears in his eyes, saying, “It is so marvelous to see you, your majesty – daily we thank God for your generosity and love. As I had always told your Grace before, the university requires a great deal of reform. We have opened new faculties in Writing and Medicine, and have finally expanded our scholarship influence between simple German people. We have more than a thousand students on our campus, and my dream is finally coming true; I had always wanted to see our University not as a sacred society for Jesuits and Canonic Orders but as a Palace of Knowledge for the peoples of Bavaria, accessible to all. However, we must still expand the faculty and build new facilities… and with the great help of your majesty then the dream will come entirely true!”
“My dear friend,” exclaimed Ludwig, placing a noble hand on Maximilian’s shoulder, “I will do what I can do help Bavaria become the most educated nation in Germany! I will give you money, I will construct buildings, and I will create scholarships for farmers and simple people – but I have one condition: the University should be moved from Landshut to the Capital, to Munich! I am building this city as the cultural center for all German art, science, and education and we must have our own University! By the way, Landshut is not the original home of the University either, for King Maximilian I brought it from Ingolstadt in 1800 to protect it from the Napoleonic Invasion. And now, after the glorious defeat of France, it is time to bring it back not to Ingolstadt, but to Munich! This I say as King and Ruler.” Maximilan nodded in graceful acquiescence, “As Your Grace wishes. I shall return immediately and will present thy wish to the Board of Ministers. I am sure they will not object and we will start the relocation process as soon as possible!” King Ludwig smiled with great pride; now his name would be forever tied with the great names of his father and ancestors, the builders of the German foundation! He did not yet know yet that it would be the students of his very University that would play a great role in Ludwig’s abdication during the 1848 German Revolution… but it will be the history to come.
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We should also mention the name of the new Minister of the Religious and Secular Education, Eduard von Schenk, who was a right hand of King Ludwig in relocation process for the University. This noble man truly believed in important role of the education to raise all German Nation. In 1826 the University was finally moved to Munich and on November 15, 1826 its door was open for the students. The Grand opening had place in the former Jesuit College building but to the year of 1840 the University expanded by the both side Ludwigstrasse buit by famous bavarian architect Friedrich von Gartner.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1826, REMOVAL OF THE UNIVERSITY
Davenport 557, KM 722, Thun 50, AKS 115, J.33
Commemoration of the removal of the Ludwig- Maximilian University from Landshut to Munich
Obverse: Head fo Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: VERLEGUNG DER LUDWIG MAXIMILIANS HOCHSCHULE VON LANDSHUT NACH MUNCHEN. 1826 below in wreath.
28.0600 g., 0.8680 Silver, 0.7830 oz. ASW.
Mint luster, uncirculated and problem-free coin.
View Coin Davenport 558 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria King Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1826 BAVARIA - REICHENBACH 558 NGC MS 62 “A moment of your time, please, Your Majesty!” Upon hearing this, King Ludwig turned swiftly around, interrupting his leisurely morning stroll through the royal gardens. His eyes met an amusing sight, for amid the white cobblestone road and marble statues there was a man running towards him. “Your Majesty! Wait,” exclaimed the man breathlessly, not noticing that his own wig had fallen slightly askew owing to his frantic run. “What is it, dear Franz?” - asked the King, understanding the runner as his Munzkabinet Director, Franz Ignaz von Streber - “don’t hurry yourself, please explain what is going on.” Franz began, “Your Majesty, I rush so as to present to you your first Taler, the one which will premier the new series of memorial coins in our Munzkabinet, to glorify our legendary scholars and artisans! The first Taler is thus ready!” Excitedly, the King replied, “Of course, I remember when you first introduced to me the idea of this memorial coin series in June! You had presented it beautifully then: ‘These coins will carry the names of famous Bavarians throughout Europe for centuries, each as its own monument to the King!’ I could not have said better myself. So tell me of our first Taler, who has the honor of appearing upon it?” The director revealed a beautiful coin glimmering on purple velvet and presented it to the King. “Reichenbach and Fraunhofer!” The Taler had inscribed upon it the faces of two gentlemen acknowledging each other in profile - “Interesting,” said the King, “and who are these two?” “These, Your Highness, are our two famous compatriots! Reichenbach was a brilliant machinist and Fraunhofer was a virtuoso glassworker. Unfortunately they both lost their lives this year and Bavaria is still in mourning, so this Taler will be an eternal commemoration to our masterful artisans!” Unable to hide an air of skepticism, Ludwig inquired, “Forgive me Franz, but what is it that they have created to deserve such highest of praises?” Incredulously, Franz replied, “Everything, Your Majesty! They have wrought iron bridges, our Bavarian saltworks, optical manufacturing, instruments of astronomical and geological variety, etc… Our telescopes and astrolabes are widely to be considered the finest in the world - even finer than those of the English. All thanks to Reichenbach and Fraunhofer, eternal memory to them, who have lost their lives at such a young age! In fact, I believe..” Having said this, the Munzkabinet Director lowered his voice and leaned closer to the King, “… that over at that glass factory they both inhaled a fair amount of poisonous gases, and their hearts couldn’t withstand it. It’s such a shame, they could have devised so many brilliant inventions yet.” Smiling, the King answered, “Well alright, you convinced me. It’s just that.. on the Taler, why do they look at each other in such a way, as though they are about to kiss? The jokesters in our country would instantly call it something ridiculous, for example, the Kissing Taler or something… Is there no other way to orient these two upon the coin?” Laughing, the director replied, “Your Majesty, we tried various alternatives, and this is the most optimal variant we could imagine - surely they cannot be looking in opposite directions!” The King looked at him with a content sense of resolution. Giving back the coin to the director, Ludwig said, “Fine by me, please release it into circulation. Let it be known to all as the Kissing Taler.” With this, the King resumed his morning walk through the gardens, amid the beautiful marble statues and the gleaming faces of hundreds of happy flowers...
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1826, REICHENBACH AND FRAUNHOFER.
Davenport 558, KM 721, Thun 51, AKS 114, J.32.
Minted on the death of the scientists Reichenbach and Fraunhofer.
Obverse: Head fo Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: DEM VERDIENSTE SEINE KRONEN, two heads facing each other, 1826, REICHENBACH --- FRAUNHOFER below.
NGC MS 62.
28.0600 g., 0.8680 Silver, 0.7830 oz. ASW.
Mirror fields, tiny hairlines, uncirculated and lustrous coin.
View Coin Davenport 559 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1827 BAVARIA - CUSTOMS TREATY 559 NGC MS 62
King Ludwig of Bayern and His Majesty, King Wilhelm I of Wurttemberg were sitting around a big table laden with wine and fruits in the central room of the palace. While holding a glass of fine wine in one hand, Wilhelm continued his speech about the coming economic challenges for the Southern German States: “...And the danger comes, of course, from our Big Brothers, Prussia and Austria! I would like to remind Your Majesty about His legacy towards his noble Father, Maximillian of Bavaria, God bless his soul. He was a very wise man and as soon as the Napoleonic War was over, he started talking about an economic reunion between the lands of Bavaria and Wurttemberg! I understood that past this idea did not work well in the past - we were too separate after the war, but times have changed! Prussia and Austria have already sign a trade agreement and they are thinking to take over the rest of German Land! We should move forward quickly! We need to create the Union and Freedom of trade in Southern Germany!”.
“The idea to have freedom of trade is really great, as is my father’s memory. He always wanted to see our people freed from the bondage of customs and tariffs, inside Germany, at least! But don’t we lose a great deal of revenue if we abolish custom fees and tariffs? I need a lot of money to rebuild and renovate Munich, the Capital…” said King Ludwig as he slowly chewed a grape in solemn thought. “Not at all, your Grace! We will remove internal tariffs but compensate for the loss in revenue by increasing external fees and custom rules. I am talking about trading with France, England and, of course, Northern German States. We are the South! We possess the power of mines and industry!” exclaimed King Wilhelm as he stood up with excitement.
“Very well, very well,” said Ludwig. Though he was listening intently to Wilhelm, his thoughts moved in a very different direction. “If he will unite the Southern German Lands under a Trading Agreement, which would help to boost the economy and make people richer and happier, then later it could be possible to unite all political power in one hand as well! And he is the one who can spread wealth and happiness to all of his citizens in loving Bavaria, and all of the German states! There would be abundance and nourishment for all, like from an antique cornucopia” Ludwig arose, saying, “I will definitely make a new coin, something in the classical antique style; perhaps a couple cornucopias and may be Caduceus as a symbol of negotiation and commerce… I must discuss the design with my engraver. My friend, I will make preparations for the Trade Agreement as soon as possible, for we will call it the Customs Treaty! We will sign it and honor my father legacy, by pursuing wealth and prosperity in our lands! And now I would like to show you some of the new paintings in my art gallery which I recently brought from Italy.”

In 1828 a Customs Union was set up between Bavaria and Wurttemberg but unfortunately at the same year Prussia, Austria and other Northern States start moving forward in development of Zollverein – the German Customs Union which eventually brought Prussia to the forefront of political power in Germany. But this is a story of its own. More to follow…
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1827, CUSTOMS TREATY
Davenport 559, KM 731, Thun 52, AKS 116, J.34
Commemoration of the Bavarian - Wurttemberg Custom Union of 1827-1828.
Obverse: Head fo Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: BAYERISCH -- WURTEMBERGISCHER ZOLLVEREIN, GESCHLOSSEN 1827 ( Bavarian - Wurttemberg custom union, formed 1827) , two cornucorias with caduceus on the center.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Clear fields, slightly toned, uncirculated with minimal hairlines from light swipping.
View Coin Davenport 560 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1827 BAVARIA - ORDER OF LUDWIG 560 NGC MS 64 The birthday ball was in full swing; music was playing and lavishly dressed guests glided across the ballroom floor of the palace. August 25th in year 1827 was the day that Bavaria celebrated the birthday of its King Ludwig I. Celebratory orchestras filled the streets of Munich, and rivers of beer flowed throughout the land. Amidst the celebration, the King himself sat in his throne room and graciously accepted gifts and congratulations from his many guests that arrived from all corners of Germany. When finally the Director and Engraver of the Mint Cabinet Franz Ignaz von Streber approached the King, he offered an ornate wooden box - the King’s eyes flashed in awe, for he knew that the precious box contained a new Taler or other fancy trinket. The King exclaimed, “Dear Ignaz, can it be? Is it a brand new Taler?” Old artist inclined his head offering the box in proud presentation, “Your Grace, this is more than just a Taler!” Gently taking the box from Ignuz, Ludwig opened it carefully and his eyes widened in amazement. Upon a red velvet pillow, shining splendidly in pure gold, was a new Order, shaped as the Maltian Cross and reflecting Ludwig’s astonishment in its golden center. “I have never seen such masterwork before, Ignuz! What do you call this?” Exclaimed the King in wonder. “This,” replied the Mintmaster, “is the new Order of King Ludwig I of Bavaria, the first of its kind. It appears, your Grace, that you never had such an Order and you are definitely need one!” Ludwig inspected the Order closely, carefully, and confirmed his amazement as the magnificent piece cast radiant light across the room. However, a bothersome thought perturbed his imagination… to whom could he bestow this newfound Order to, and for what accomplishment? Ignuz seemed to recognize the King’s momentary unease, and stated, “Every King needs his own order, to reward servants to the King for valorous deeds in the name of Germany!” And now the King smiled slyly, saying, “Dear Franz, thank you for the wonderful gift! I have made a decision; you will be the first recipient of this prestigious Order, for excellency in the crafting of the Bavarian history in beautiful Orders and Coins! You are the first to be worthy of their grand purpose! Furthermore, you have been a faithful servant to this great realm for many years, and your work for my father Maximilan and me, Ludwig the First, must be memorialized forever!” In eternal gratitude, the Mintmaster bowed low and exclaimed, “As your Grace would will it, I shall graciously accept this infinite honor. It brings great joy to my heart to see recognition for the formation of the MuenzCabinet and the continual production of great coinage for this wondrous nation. Each Taler is yet another shining gem in the crown of all of your Grace’s achievements as the King of this land.” Ludwig bowed his head in return, saying, “My dear friend, you have my gratitude for this wondrous gift. But don’t forget,tomorrow, bring the sketch for the new Taler as well! We will call it “King Ludwig Order Taler”!”

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Order of Ludwig was awarded to the citizens and government workers for the honest and faithful service to the king as well as for the 50 years of service. During the time of war each year counts as two. The Order was designed as gold Cross for there high ranked officers and as a gold medal for the 50 years of faithful service to the king for the rest of servants and citizens.

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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1827, ORDER OF LUDWIG
Davenport 560, KM 732, Thun 53, AKS 118, J.35
Commemoration of the founding of the Order of Ludwig for the long and faithful service to the king.
Obverse: Head fo Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: STIFTUNG DES LUDWIGS-ORDENS (Founding of the Ludwig Order), the portrait of the king on cross with LUDWIG KOENIG VON BAYERN aroung, 1827 below.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Cameo strike, clear mirror fields, proof-like appearance.
View Coin Davenport 561 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1827 BAVARIA - THERESIEN ORDER 561 NGC MS 63 In the morning, King Ludwig lay in bed for a long while and tried remembering the many events that occurred the night before. Pain throbbed in his temples, soreness sat in his throat, and a strange metallic taste permeated his dry mouth. “Damn Spanish wine, (a gift from the King of Spain for Ludwig’s birthday), shouldn’t have drunk so much of it… At least the royal ball went well, for there was much merriment and cause for mystery as to how I ended up in my room this morning!” He resolved to ask his wife Theresa, and then remembered – “I have the feeling that she is upset with me, for it seems that I may have danced with a certain dame… or two… can’t remember any of it.” Sighing, the King staggered out of the bed and made his way to clean himself up before breakfast.
At breakfast, together they sat in an uncomfortable silence. King Ludwig would guiltily glance at his wife from time to time and absentmindedly pick at the food on his plate, yet Theresa stayed quiet and solemnly refused to look at her spouse. In his mind, Ludwig was coming to all sorts of conclusions: “Looks like it’s time to buy precious jeweled ring again…or even necklace ” Upon considering the cost to his Royal Treasury that another gift to his wife would claim, Ludwig suddenly started at noticing his wife’s eyes locked with his. With an air of disappointment, Theresa began, “How many more times, Your Majesty, should I tolerate your irresponsible antics? When we married, you assured me – no, you promised me – that you’d be mine and only mine, and would carry me in your arms. And now, you don’t even look at me for the whole night; not a single dance, not even a single glance!” Ludwig lowers his head, and uncomfortably responds, “My dear wife, please explain to me… whom could I have been looking at, if not you?”
Theresa’s eyes flashed – “I know not at whom you were looking. Your Majesty was too busy going around and bestowing the new Order of His Highness King Ludwig, or however you called it, to the men that you were drinking with! The Order of Ludwig! Or your Grace was too interested in constant flirtation with all those girls you surrounded yourself with, who have completely lost any shame they once had, not to mention honor! I always think, does our kingdom not have any mild-mannered, faithful girls, that honor themselves and don’t flirt with married men, even if it’s the King himself?!” Theresa rose, with anger in her face and lightning in her eyes. “Perhaps I’ll do as you have done, Your Highness, and will bestow an Order for every good-natured girl in our kingdom. I might even call it the Order of Theresa, the poor deceived wife who must bear the drunken escapades of her self-absorbed husband. Unlike your Order of Ludwig, that you were so generously giving out right and left in your inebriation; my Order will glorify clean lifestyles and will honor the pious, good-hearted women of the kingdom of Bavaria. Of course these recipients will be unmarried women of significant social stature – they must attend church and lead exclusively Puritan ways of life – as I myself pleasure in doing. Everything I do, I do to be an example for those that I represent. I have birthed heirs for us; I have raised them, and try to be the ideal wife for Your Highness and Queen for Your people – but you! Your drunken foolishness! Your female admirers!” – With her face in her hands, Theresa began to weep.
“Well, that didn’t go so well…” thought Ludwig. He approached her, embraced her tightly and looked into her eyes: “Forgive me, my love! There isn’t a single woman in this entire kingdom that is worth more to me than you are. All of our kingdom isn’t worth a single tear from your beautiful eyes! I assure you – no, I promise you – that henceforth I will be with you, and will only breathe and live for you alone.” His voice trembled. It seemed that he himself was beginning to believe the words coming out of his mouth. “Your desires are law for me! If you want an Order, then today an Order of Theresa will be specially excised for you – what a fantastic, royal name! To award this to the pious women of the land, I shall immediately sign a decree for 100 – no, 300 guldens for each woman you deem worthy of your prestigious Order! I have even thought of a name to bestow upon these honorable recipients – we shall call them “Ehrendame” before the entire royal court!”.

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The Order of Theresa is still continues to exist today as an noble society for the ladies from House of Wittelsbach and other aristocratic families in Bavaria. Queen Theresa originally determined eligibility for the ladies to be a christian, born under the Law of Church and non-married. She personally choose first twelve cavaliers of the Order and established an annual pension for each of them as well as the title of “Ehrendame” or “Dame of Honour”. The Order should be worn on the left breast and consist of a blue Maltese Cross with a white edge and a gold royal crown above. At the centre there is a gold bordered white medallion with the letter T. On the back there is an year (1827) as well as the motto: “Unser Leben sey Glaube an das Ewige” (Our life is faith forever). There are some Dames of Honour still living today such as the Princess of Liechtenstein, for example.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1827, ORDER OF THERESE.
View Coin Davenport 562 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1828 BAVARIA - MONUMENT 562 NGC MS 63 … “A letter from the King, for the Count,” exclaimed old valet, and with a bow of reverence presented a rather large package adorned with kingly symbols and a wax stamp bearing the letter “L”. Slowly, Count Franz Erwein von Schoenborn shut the book he was reading and apprehensively rose from his seat to greet the servant. “From the King? Surely you are not mistaken, Karl?” “Not at all, my lord! The clues do not lie; the package is from Munich, brought by the King’s courier, and the type as well… if you please, my Lord,” replied the servant calmly. Anxiously, the Count took hold of the package, saying, “Yes, it seems that my old friend Ludwig hasn’t forgotten about me! But what could be inside?” Opening the package, he found a small box with a folded letter; Franz instantly recognized the King’s handwriting. It read: “Dear friend, in memory of our mutual project, I send to you an example of the new Taler presenting our magnificent Pillar of the Constitution. As the ancient Greeks would say: one friend of the Constitution would send it to another! Our Pillar is a spectacular monument to the will of the German spirit! The Constitution, adopted by my father, shall unify us all before God and Law, and prevent the corruption and lawlessness that we suffered through during the dictatorship of Napoleon!” The Count opened the velvet box and thoughtfully eyed the gleaming new coin. Upon one side was stamped the majestic monolith of the Pillar, with an inscription of “The Pillar of the Constitution, erected by the Count von Schoenborn in memory of the year 1828”. On the other side, the regal profile of King Ludwig of Bavaria twinkled at him. With tears of memory in his eyes, the Count thought, “Thank you, Ludwig… thank you, my dear old friend.” He remembered how they hotly debated the project of the monument to commemorate the Ten Year Constitutional Anniversary, how they argued about the design with famous architect Leo von Klentze, who was brought by Ludwig himself from Munich and how in the year of 1821, the future King of Bavaria set into the earth the first foundation stone for a colossal monument. He also reminisced about the jubilant unveiling of the monument on the day of August 23rd, 1828, and the rivers of Bavarian beer and rapturous music and dance that marked a glorious day. The Celebration of the Constitution became an inseparable symbol of German culture, as thousands of people flocked from across the land to Gaibach to attend the festival. “Thank you, Ludwig, thank you, our dear, righteous King,” thought the Count as he looked at the new shiny coin in his hand… He did not yet know that on the celebration day of the year 1832, his good friend William Joseph Behr would utter a speech that would have him arrested as a slanderer of His Highness the King. Despite numerous appeals in the year 1835, he would be pronounced guilty and thrown into prison. Following this turn of events, the Count von Schoenborn entirely ceased to participate in politics any longer, and Constitutional celebrations in Gaibach were abandoned.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1828, COLUMN OF THE CONSTITUTION
Davenport 562, KM 735, Thun 55, AKS 123, J.38
Commemoration of Tenth Anniversary of the Bavarian Constitution.
Obverse: Head fo Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: VERFASSUNGSSAEULE ERRICHTET VOM GR. V. SCHOENBORN, Column, EINGEWEIHT 1828.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
NGC MS 63.
Cameo strike, proof-like appearance, some tiny hairlines in the fields.
View Coin Davenport 563 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1828 BAVARIA - ROYAL FAMILY 563 NGC MS 64 Young Adalbert lay snugly wrapped in a snowy white blanket, sucking his pacifier with tranquility. “What a beautiful creation! But more importantly – look, one can already see the features of the Wittelsbach Family twinkling through him! That nose, that profile, it looks kingly already! And how sweetly he minds that binky,” exclaimed Ludwig as he embraced Theresa, and they lovingly looked into the baby’s crib. The newborn prince was yet another much-anticipated heir to the royal line of King Ludwig I of Bavaria. He was the youngest of four brothers, the other three having provided the Wittelsbach line with a bright future of great promise. “Thank you, my love,” whispered Ludwig as he kissed his wife, his eyes shining with tears of overwhelming pride. Another heir, all that a true king could possibly hope for! “It truly is some sort of a divine blessing upon our family. In fact, “Heavenly Blessing” sounds excellent as an inscription of some kind… let’s ask our dear director of the Muentzkabinet to issue a Memorial Taler for my youngest son and heir gracing these words, at once!” Instantly, Ludwig was swept into wild imaginings of the future Taler’s lustre and gleam until his wife’s curly brown hair softly came to rest upon his shoulder. “Dearest husband and King, but what of the other children? They too are all divine blessing upon this beautiful family. Surely it would be gracious to create a special Taler for each of them!” Thoughtfully, Ludwig replied, “Not a bad idea, my dear, we would get eight gorgeous, unique Talers – one for each precious child,” until suddenly, an enchanting idea invited his eyes to widen, “…or even better, we’ll have one great Taler to include all eight of them in their splendor! What an astonishing idea! We shall call it the Family Taler, the first of its kind!” In rapture of excitement, he swiftly kissed his wife and ran to find the Muentzdirektor.
————————————————————————————————— Male heirs were of utmost importance to the royal family – without them, the future of the kingly bloodline would be threatened. In the year 1834, the German historian Kramer wrote, “The ancient trunk is threatened that has only one branch, yet the eternal sky still watches the holy oak of Wittelsbach – and with its blessing, the tree’s radiant canopy has opened yet again.” The Family Taler displays the children of Ludwig I and his queen Theresa: the crown prince Maximilian, behind whom is Maximilian II (born 11/28/1811), Mathilda (08/30/1813), Otto (06/01/1815) – furthermore, the king of Greece, Leopold (03/14/1821) with prince-regent Adelgund (03/19/1823), Hildegard (06/10/1825), Alexander (08/26/1826) and Adalbert (07/19/1828). Another daughter, Theodolinde (10/07/1816) died during childhood and was unable to feature on the coin.
The Family Taler was of such popularity that even other kings tried to replicate the idea; for instance, the Russian Emperor Nicholas I released a series of Family Rubles, the likeness of which resembles the Family Taler of Ludwig I! 
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1828, ROYAL FAMILY.
Davenport 563, KM 734, Thun 56, AKS 121, J.37.
For the Blessing of Heaven on the Royal Family.
Obverse: Head fo Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: SEGEN DES HIMMELS, portrait of the mother queen surrounded by those of her eight children, 1828 below.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
NGC MS 64.
Patchy dim toning, mirror-like fields, sharp strike.
View Coin Davenport 564 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1829 BAVARIA - COMMERCE TREATY 564 NGC MS 64 Baron Johann Friedrich von Cotta did not sleep all night. His writing desk was overflowing with countless papers, each saturated with fine scrawls of black script. He would pull one out of the stack, briefly glare at it, angrily tear it to shreds, and mindlessly reach for another blank sheet to begin scrawling anew. Plumes of blue tobacco smoke hung motionless under the ceiling of the musty library. For the Baron knew that tomorrow would be a momentous day; he must speak at the Munich Assembly, with hopes of convincing King Ludwig of Bavaria to agree to a Customs Union with Prussia and Hesse-Darmstadt. Following a prolonged discussion with Friedrich von Motz, the Prussian Minister of Finance, the Baron understood the various political landmarks that such a union could create. A firm union between the North and South would not only weaken Middle Union states like Saxony and Hannover, but would also greatly lessen the influence of foreign traders such as France and England - not to mention Austria, who stubbornly refused to join the Union. The Baron thought to himself, “Convincing King Ludwig will be a difficult and trying task, considering his insistence for Bavarian dominance in this region… but perhaps I can find a few potent arguments.” Friedrich Wilhelm, the King of Prussia, would find himself in the position to make various concessions and to lose some money - but it would be for the greater good. For one cannot forget that the industrial sector of Prussia is desperately in need of coal and silver from Harz, among other southern lands. The Austrian economy is at stake! Such a union would bring Prussia into the pinnacles of German power.
The next day, golden rays of sun shone through the palace windows, reflecting polychromatic brilliance through carved wineglasses and ornate jewelry worn by distinguished ministers and officials. Amid the atmosphere the Baron roared, “We will join our lands with duty-free roads! The heart of Harz will be linked with Prussian factories! In time, the Zollverein could even expand to the Middle States! If we join our powers, we will show the rest of our impotent neighbors, especially - Austria - that our beloved Germany is united in its power and DOMINANCE!” With this the Baron fell back into his chair and downed an entire glass of wine in one triumphant swig. Silence hung in the air like smoke, and all eyes were fixed on the contemplative form of King Ludwig of Bavaria. Rising slowly from his seat, the King regally lifted his hand and held aloft his brimming glass of wine. After a moment of silence, he suddenly bellowed, “To the new Customs Union! To a Germany without borders! To the freedom of trade! To prosperity!” And immediately the entire palace became filled with thunderous applause! The King of Bavaria rejoiced, for his father’s long-standing dream had finally been fulfilled; Germany slowly but surely edged towards unity and blossoming wealth. As if to comfort the tears of joy in his eyes, an idea split his mind like a flash of white lightning - he should make a Taler, adorned with cornucopias and noble shields and a caduceus! It would be beauty incarnate!

After a time, all other states joined the Zollverein under Prussian leadership. This led to the unity of Germany under Prussian economic and political power.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1829, COMMERCE TREATY.
Davenport 564, KM 738, Thun 57, AKS 124, J.39.
Commemoration of the Bavarian - Prussian- Wurttemberg and Hesse commerce treaty.
Obverse: Head fo Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: HANDELSVERTRAG ZWISCHEN BAYERN, PREUSSEN, WURTTEMBERG UND HESSEN, 1829 (Commercial Treaty between Bavaria, Prussia, Wurttemberg and Hesse) , two cornucorias with caduceus on the center and four shields around.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Smoked toning, clear fields, rainbow mirror. Uncirculated and beautiful.
View Coin Davenport 565 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1835 BAVARIA KM-751 565 NGC MS 63 King Ludwig sat at his splendid desk and carefully, meticulously looked over a bright new stempelglanz; this Kronentaler was solemnly given to him by the director of the Müenzkabinet for direct personal inspection. With a bow of respectful grace, Ignatz von Streber proudly pronounced, “What you see in this coin shall be a new series of Kronentaler… and as Your Majesty requested, displaying an entirely new style of hair.” Ludwig scrutinized the piece intensely, restlessly muttering, “No, no, there is something quite wrong with the hair… these locks above the ears are placed so improperly! In fact, I desired for my kingly forehead to be opened wide for the entire world to revel at, akin to that of a stern Greek philosopher! Surely you understand, Ignatz, that a mighty forehead is to be revealed and proudly worn at all times - it is a sign of great knowledge and deep wisdom! And what is it exactly that you have brought me here? How would all of my subjects regard such a picture? They would see their beloved King in all his glory as he emerged from his bed as though he were near the brink of a splendid death, after a miserable night with a mistress whose name he had long forgotten!”
…..
Suddenly, the King’s voice grew considerably gentler: “Actually, the Lady Regina, yes, Regina Daxenberger - beautiful and wild, perhaps even dangerous...” the King’s faced smiled as though recalling a beautifully fragrant memory. “I have already commissioned my artist Joseph Stieler to create a portrait of her for my own personal Gallery of Beauties! A dear friend of mine, she is a great lady, a pure Bavarian despite being a lowly copper-smith’s daughter! After having asked her to be the First Lady for the Royal Ball with the Duke Maximilian, I was thrilled that she consented! We danced wildly all night and I have no recollection of how the course of events ended up in my bedroom… Unfortunately, the next morning, my artist Joseph insisted that I pose for a solid few hours for some sort of portrait, despite not feeling crisp at all myself.”

After this, the director of the Muenzkabinet decided to interrupt; with a bow, he said, “If your Grace permits me, I believe I know what kind of portrait Herr Stieler painted that morning.” Raising a surprised brow, Ludwig exclaimed, “Oh do you? So would you be so kind as to inform me about this damn portrait exactly?” Respectfully, Ignatz von Streber did not move and maintained his bow throughout his answer: “I believe it was ordered to inscribe thy great profile into the new Kronentaler, as per the order of the Müenzkabinet. In fact, it is the very coin that you hold in your jeweled hands.” Returning his gaze to the sparkling piece of metallic artistry held in his fingers, Ludwig sighed, “So this is the outcome…” He glanced over his shining metallic profile with a momentary glint of mad delight in his eyes.

Finally, he sighed, “In that case, it makes complete sense for my hair to tell such a wild story. If the finest hair artists in the kingdom could not tame my mad lion’s mane, then so be it, it must be left as is. To do otherwise is not in accordance with the will of God, and as God’s direct messenger and pure incarnation, I would most definitely know. As for the forehead, I am no Greek philosopher, no damned Aristotle - instead, I am King Ludwig of Bavaria! Nothing more, and nothing less! If I have the love of my subjects, then it is all that this vessel of God would ever need. In fact, Ignatz, change nothing! Send the Kronentaler into circulation as is, complete with my fabulous hair!”
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1835, KRONENTALER.
Davenport 565, KM 751 (394), Thun 48, AKS 76, J.30.
Regular issue Taler (Krone).
KEY DATE and LOW MINTAGE - 7500 only.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: Crown within wreath, "GERECHT UND BEHARRLICH" (Just and firm).
Edge: BAYERISCHER KRONTHALER
29.5400 g., 0.8710 Silver, 0.8272 oz. ASW.
Slightly toned, dull luster, uncirculated and rare. Key Date.
View Coin Davenport 566 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1830 BAVARIA - LOYALTY 566 PCGS MS 64 News from across the border had begun to grow worse with the passage of time. The year 1830 never failed to bring new surprises to the royal dynasties of Europe. Before the cannonades of a rebellious France quieted down, the bloody July Revolution broke the Bourbon throne and forced King Charles X to flee the country. In pursuit, the fires of rebellion flared in Brussels as well as in the southern province of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands. The separatists, which consisted of students and working class men and women, demanded the independence of Belgium as a separate Kingdom. This alarming societal turbulence came to arise as well in Switzerland and Italy.

“Even Poland, even Poland breaking from the Russian Empire! There is way too much blood flowing from this world,” lamented King Ludwig as he grimly watched on from the window into the depths of a thick Bavarian night. He could not help but sense the wraith impending doom hanging overhead, bearing down on his beloved Bavaria, his sacred Germany. “Damn these Romantics; who do these students think they are? They are students, revolutionaries, but mere children! They do not know what they bargain for when they look for such unknown changes!”

“O God, deliver and save my beloved Bavaria! Who needs this constitutional monarchy? If the King understands how to wield his people to the purest extent, there is no use for a Parliament! They would only deliberate endlessly about the King’s firm decisions! No. Only the King must hold the reins of his kingdom aloft, through the grace of God Himself!”

All of a sudden, the King’s thoughts took an entirely new direction. “I must give back to my subjects, and show them the meaning of their righteous King! In all the months of this revolutionary year, not a single spark of discontent appeared within the walls of my Kingdom. Surely they must love their life, their land, their leader! Alas, my heart burns to somehow reflect your unceasing devotion and humility! I shall resolve to introduce a new holiday, to be called the “Day of Kingly Loyalty” and to overflow with festivity and cheer!”

And instantly, an idea gleamed within the eyes of the righteous monarch: “Or better yet - I will bestow to each and every one of my beloved Bavarian subjects a special Taler - it will sing 'TO LOYALTY’! Surely the Goddess of Loyalty and Devotion, Eusebia, belongs within the coin’s shining embrace. She shall be seated with an oak branch in hand, held aloft, as the symbol for Germany… A hound will rest at her feet, as yet another incarnation of pure devotion and loyalty to the one and only cause!” Hurriedly, the King flew to his writing desk and began to order the commission of an entirely new Bavarian coin.
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King Ludwig was indeed correct - the year 1830 proved to be exceedingly tranquil for his beloved Bavaria, as for the entirety of Germany. At that point he had no clue as to the impending thunder of the year 1844, when Bavaria would flare into the winds of revolt as seen in the “Beer Riot”; this thunder would eventually culminate with the bloody Revolution of 1848 and his royal abdication. But this chapter of the story yet remains to be told!
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1830, LOYALTY.
Davenport 566, KM 750, Thun 58, AKS 125, J.40.
Commemorative - for the faithfulness of Bavarians to the King.
Obverse: Head fo Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: BAYERNS TREUE (Faithfulnes of Bavarians), seated femail with oak branch and dog. 1830 below.
PCGS MS 64.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Dul luster, spotty toning, uncirculated.
View Coin Davenport 567 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver TALER 1831 BAVARIA - LEGISLATURE 567 NGC MS 62 Yesterday, in the Royal Palace, behind closed doors, the President of the Chamber of Deputies Sebastian von Schrenk met with the Supreme king, His rightful Majesty the Ludwig I of Bavaria. The conversation flowed, of course, regarding the Parliamentary session, that had originally been intended to take place on the 1st of March in the year 1831. “Lookie here, my dear Sebastian!” exclaimed the king as he slid a paper over to the Head of the Government. The paper had inscribed upon it some kind of unintelligible drawing, vaguely resembling a lion holding a shield. “What’s this, your Highness?” asked von Schrenck, who rarely had a personal audience with the king, and for this reason felt not completely sure of himself… “This is what I want to see in our Parliament – nah, this is what even our Great Maximilian, Papa Max, wanted to see when he ratified the Constitution of 26th May 1818 – our lion Bavaria, ..resembling a lion, being defended from enemies through our Constitution, our Laws and our Parliament which is the very lens of Law and Culture! I even fitted onto the shield a famous semblance of Horatio – Justus et propositi tenax – Just and Firm – how a TRUE monarch should act, freely giving power to the Parliament, but.. believe me, my dear Sebastian.. I would greatly desire for you to, so to say.. scratch MY, erm, kingly back, ha ha - in return.. to help ME to reinstate sacred stability and lawfulness in Our Country! I need L A W S that will unite the Catholics and the Protestants, the Artistocracy and the Christians, the army and the people, bless their hearts!” – and with this the king shot a direct and uncompromising stare straight into the Head of the Parliament – “I hope that you understand.”
.. “Of course, your Highness!” At once the von Schrenck felt himself embarrassed, uncomfortable, and truly corpse-like in the searing beam of the king’s no-nonsense laser look. “..but this will not be easy. Our 2-nd Constitution, of course, looks far from completion. Although the Protestants equalized their rights with the Catholics, the government still refuses many of our own deputies their own official powers referring to religious preferences of creed, our army diligently swears by the New Constitution. But please don’t worry, Your Highness! We have already prepared a brochure of new laws in print, a new Cabinet of Ministers has already stepped up to the job, and they’re currently perusing the new budget! I’m certain that our new Landtag will be able to handle any disagreements that may arise between the Lower and Upper Chambers and will arrange for the newest and best conditions for the flourishing of our dear Bavaria!”
“Well, excellent!” Ludwig arose, clearly intending to conclude the meeting, all the while saying,
“I do sincerely hope that the liberal Parliament specifically will manage to solve the numerous sufferings and problems in our country! And I, as a true liberal Monarch, ha, ha, will once again repeat to You the immortal Horatian epithet – J U S T U S E T P R O P O S I T I T E N A X – justice and perseverance !! In fact, this sketch of a lion with a shield will adorn our new celebratory Taler, in dear dedication to our New, Just, and liberal Parliament!”
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Unfortunately, the dreams of king Ludwig regarding a just and unified Parliament did not, in fact, materialize into reality. The liberal government of Eduard von Schrenk could not solve all of the numerous contradictions, the new projects on laws - including the law as it had already at that time appeared in print – unable to handle ANY criticism, any and all liberal decision-making as enacted by the Lower Chamber immediately hit the brakes in the Governmental Advisory chamber. The deputies even cut financial allocations to the Ministry of War and even to the upkeep of the royal palace – this greatly angered the king. And in the end, king Ludwig rejected the liberal scheme of governmental organization and planning, which of course led to cataclysmic opposition in the whole of Parliament. But this already spells a different story for a new and upcoming history in the not-too-distant future.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig I Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1831, LEGISLATURE.
Davenport 567, KM 760, Thun 59, AKS 126, J.41.
Commemorative - for the opening of Local Legislature.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK.
Reverse: Lion holding shield. Legend - GERECHT UND BEHARRLICH. 1831 below.
NGC MS 62.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Patchy champagne toning, more on obverse, cameo strike on reverse with some hairlines on the field.
View Coin Davenport 568 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria King Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1832 BAVARIA - PRINCE OTTO 568 PCGS MS 63 “Only a monarchy!” 
As he rigidly looked around the room at the seated diplomats, the British Foreign Secretary Lord Palmerston felt his sideburns flare in austerity. “There are more than enough noble families in Europe that could provide a suitable monarch for this young country that has only recently shed 400 years of Turkish control and brutality.” As he turned to France and Russia, the other “Great Powers”, it struck him that he was Great Britain’s mouthpiece in deciding the fate of a sovereign European government. The diplomats exchanged tense glances.
“We must find a young prince from a good family and give unto him the reins of power. In time he will find his wisdom with the help of our power in counsel, finances, and military.” Palmerston sat down at the table, put on his spectacles, and began to search through a stack of papers. “Ah, how about young Leopold, the Duke of Saxe-Coburg - would he not make a great prince for the Greek State?”
“A moment, if you please…” 
The quiet voice penetrated the silence and surprised the Foreign Secretary - in fact, every man in the room turned to see from where the sound began its flight. It was Baron Rothschild, the financial genius of the English Crown, whose leaden opinion carried unspeakable weight. “Unfortunately the Rothschild Bank cannot possibly satisfy the requirements of Prince Leopold. He already requested an absurd amount of 60 million francs in exchange for promising safety on northern borders. In addition, the young monarch has repeatedly stated that he preferred to assume the Kingship of newly-formed Belgium - something to do with staying closer to his own homeland. We certainly cannot lend gigantic sums to a King that threatens unpredictability in his decision making.” After Rothschild returned to stony silence, Lord Palmerston drew a deep breath, saying, “So be it, let us seek out other candidates.”
“And how about Prince Otto, the son of Ludwig, King of Bavaria?” All eyes again sought out the speaker, who revealed himself to be Colonel Carl Wilhelm von Heideck, a brave soldier and national hero. Arising, this iron-willed man began to address the court of diplomats: “The prince is young and full of life, adores Greece, and above all, has the the support of Ludwig with his Bavarians and his money. The King has already endured vast financial expenditure - mind you, more than any other European monarch - directed toward sustaining the Greek struggle for independence and now should deserve to see the fruits of his effort. What better gift than to see his own son hold the reins of power?”
Not a bad idea, thought Palmerston, one that would favor the Germans - his gaze remained fixed on the speaker. “And what does the Prince of Bavaria, a Roman Catholic, have in common with the Greek traditions, language, religion? The populace would surely reject such a foreign King.” Inclining his head proudly, Colonel von Heideck flared back in quick rebuttal: “The honorable Lord forgets that Prince Otto himself is a direct descendant of the royal Greek dynasties. His ancestor, Duke John II was also a direct descendant of the Komnenos and Laskaris dynasties. As for the language and traditions, the prince is young and eager to learn it all!” 
Lord Palmerston arose with conviction: “Are there any other suggestions?” - the resulting silence from the court could not be clearer - "Then it is decided! Send word to Munich immediately, and may the prince assume his position without delay. This assembly is adjourned.” The court of diplomats begun to dissociate in a relieved flurry of activity. The Lord then turned to the Russian and French diplomats, saying, “As for us, we must turn our discussion to the future borders of the new kingdom…”

So in 1832 the Great Powers - Britain, France, and Russia - decided the fate of Greece without consulting a single Greek individual. On the seventh of May, the decision was made to install Prince Otto of Bavaria as the King of a newly independent Greece. King Ludwig signed the Coronation agreement on May 27th and on August 8th, the Greek Assembly signed its final approval of appointing Otto as King. Despite loving the country and heritage with all his heart, Otto never became the shining beacon of stability and hope for the Greek people. This eventually brought with it the storms of uprising and the shame of abdication… but this is the story to come. 
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1832, PRINCE OTTO.
Davenport 568, KM 761, Thun 60, AKS 127, J.42.
Commemorative - for the selection of Prince Otto of Bavaria as first king of Greece.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: OTTO PRINZ V. BAYERN GRIECHENLANDS ERSTER KOENIG, Prince Otto receiving crown from Greece, 1832 below.
PCGS MS 63.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Dull luster, patchy toning, clear fields, uncirculated and cabinet quality coin.
View Coin Davenport 569 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. King Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Siver TALER 1833 BAVARIA - CUSTOMS UNION 569 PCGS MS 63 “My dear Ludwig!” - exclaimed Friedrich Wilhelm III through shining eyes underneath somber brows - “Enough playing games, I have seen through them all already! All of your attempts to unify the South under your political influence break upon the rocks of Prussian economic superiority. What good lies within your Custom Unions when all of your allies promise you one thing yet actually run to me behind your back and beg for economic favors? Yes, I refer to your friends Leopold and Wilhelm, those who rule Baden and Wurttemberg… they already sent emissaries to me and asked me to take them within our trade union. And furthermore, you yourself dream of a unified and strong Germany, yet Prussia, as you know, is the largest and strongest territory. And your currency! Of course I value your Guilders but let us acknowledge the truth - within every region is witnessed the superiority of the Vereinsmunze Talers. For this reason, my dear friend, the sooner that we (and I refer to Prussia and Bavaria) embrace each other within a solitary Custom Union, there will the economy be firmest, of our lands and of Germany.”

King Friedrich took a mouthful of wine from his crystal glass. He and King Ludwig I sat in the ornate Great Hall of the Palace. The meeting between the two monarchs occurred behind closed doors in solitude, and only one theme dominated the discussion: the establishment of a unitary economic climate within German lands. Slowly, King Ludwig rose from his armchair and took a few slow, measured steps. Within his head, thoughts tore away at his patience. He understood perfectly well that Prussia dominated Bavaria in economy and in sheer territory. He also understood that all of his efforts in the creation of the 1828 Southern Custom Union have fallen by the wayside and he can no longer exert his influence in the region at hand. Something needed to be done, and coincidentally, King Friedrich decides to visit the Palace. “You speak of Wurttemberg and Baden?” Said the King, exhaling slowly and setting his wineglass upon the table. “I understand perfectly well, dear Friedrich, your intentions to unify the region under Prussia’s centrality. You would have all other regions as your vassals paying their dues to Your Highness.” With this Ludwig met the gaze of the Prussian king head-on. “I am speaking of an economic union - politically, Bavaria shall remain as its own subject of influence with its own boundaries and with its own king.” Friedrich did not break the gaze of the Bavarian monarch. Friedrich began: “You already have lost Hessen and soon shall lose Wurttemberg, dearest Ludwig. Let us set aside all prejudices and make a decision that will benefit us all and all of the German people.”

Friedrich took another swig of wine. Ludwig eyed the Prussian monarch carefully. Ludwig asked, “How is it that we can unify all of the Custom Unions - South, North, and the Thuringian States?” Friedrich replied sharply, “My dear friend! Today I have invited Herr Friedrich List from France, our famous compatriot and the finest economist in the world and he shall, within the month, formulate a plan for a transition to a new economic level, to a, say, unitary German Custom Union. We shall unify the North, Central, and Southern Unions under the same economic rules and currency, to honor a Unified Germany!” - and Friedrich straightened his back to his full stature with wineglass in hand, seeming to offer a toast to the Bavarian king. “Splendid!” exclaimed Ludwig, also raising his glass to meet the Prussian’s, “to the flourishing and economic unification of Germany!” He understood that today he needed to strike this deal in order to avoid the collapse of the Southern Union, yet tomorrow would be a different day and nobody could know how Austria would behave herself, another great power in the massive chess game that is United Germany.
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And thus the German Custom Union was born. Soon over 20 million Germans would live under the same Customs rules and tariffs. The monetary system as well as all measurements experienced a unification. The economy grew, railroads were constructed, and banks were blooming - especially the Central Bank of Prussia. Yet the economic unification did not bring a political peacetime to the German states. Due to Prussian dominance over the other German states, the states grew more and more unstable and as a result, Prussia and Austria declared war on each other in 1866. The political instability grew to such a great extent that even Bavaria and some other medium-sized members of the Zollverein such as Hesse-Kassel, Hannover, and Nassau joined Austria in her fight against the Prussian regime - but this is another story to come…
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1833, CUSTOM UNION.
Davenport 569, KM 762 (403), Thun 61, AKS 128, J.43.
Commemorative - for the Custom Union with Prussia, Saxony, Hesse and Thuringia.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: ZOLLVEREIN MIT PREUSSEN, SACHSEN, HESSEN U. THURINGEN, standed figure of godness of trade with caduceus, conucopias and anchor with prow of ship. 1833 below.
PCGS MS 63.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Cameo strike with mirror fields, exemptional quality coin.
View Coin Davenport 570 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria King Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1833 BAVARIA - MONUMENT 570 NGC MS 62 The gray curtain fluttered wildly in the wind as it began to fall, slowly revealing the cold gleam of the Obelisk. The crowd of people silently looked on as the colossal stele gradually shed its loose gray skin, bringing to light the immensity of a great needle puncturing the blue of the October skies. Once they were raised from the depths of the Mediterranean following the Battle of Navarino, Turkish cannons passed through the hellfire of Ruhr furnaces to transform into sheets of shimmering blue steel plate, coldly wrapping the sides of the needle – as though reminiscent of the boundless frozen fields in Russia upon which countless thousands of Bavarians drew their last breath, back in the year 1812 under the command of Bonaparte.
Aged veterans stood with tears in their weary eyes. To finally realizing this dream demanded considerable expense and effort – but at long last, the steely tribute of the living to the dead stood proud and unshakable in the wind.
Even King Ludwig could not keep from releasing tears on such a momentous occasion, and his heart shone with honor to stand beside his family members during the monument’s unveiling ceremony. He proudly remembered the long and arduous road that led to this day, an endeavor begun long ago by his father in the distant year of 1818. At the outset, the master architect Leo Von Klenze devised a majestic project to erect the monolithic column at Odeon Place, but this plan was met with certain problems. The column demanded vast sums of metal for which there was little money – even the chosen location proved unrealistic, as much of the city would have needed to be demolished to make space for a monument of such a grand scale. After several overly heated discussions, Leo begrudgingly modified his plans – he decided to craft the column from ordinary bricks, to be wrapped with an outside layer of cast iron plates. For this they melted down old church bells and rusted Turkish cannons, the aged relics of battles long past. The new location for the monument was chosen to be Karolinen Place, an agreeable stretch of open land. By far the most important segment of the monolith was the massive bronze base, expertly crafted by the legendary casting-master Johann Baptist Stiglmaler. Ludwig himself engraved the words into the heavy plaque, immortalizing them in solid bronze.
Closing his eyes, Ludwig read aloud: “For the thirty thousand Bavarians who met their deaths in the Russian Wars, laying down their lives for the liberation of the Fatherland. Erected by Ludwig I of Bavaria upon completion on October 18th, 1833.” How wonderfully it sounded! He remembered soulfully reciting it to his dear wife Teresa, who responded in surprise, “Your Grace! What ‘liberation of the fatherland’ does it refer to?” Ludwig responded, “It speaks of releasing our Bavaria from the clutches of the enemy. Our soldiers always gave their lives for the Fatherland! Why, is something not right?” In quick reply, Teresa said, “I think it needs a little more clarification – from what enemy was the Fatherland liberated? Napoleon? From the Russians? And what Fatherland is it referring to? Bavaria? Russia?”
“Of course, it refers to our common enemy Napoleon,” snapped Ludwig, “Or no, wait, back then we were allied with the French to liberate the lands of Bavaria from the Russians. But Bavaria wasn’t part of Russia back then – those were just Napoleonic stories… it appears that I’m thoroughly confused.” With this, he collapsed into his chair, distraught and perplexed. “It’s decided! We won’t change a thing about the memorial plaque. Let each decide for themselves, whatever land was protected from whatever enemy.. those details are trifles. The obelisk itself is for our valiant soldiers! I’m tired and need to eat.”

Of the 30,000 Bavarians that departed to Russia with Napoleon in the year 1812, only 2000 returned with the honorable General Wrede. The rest of them remained in those frigid fields, the new Fatherland that was promised by Napoleon. In truth, the original inscription on Ludwig’s Obelisk had nothing to with the “Liberation war of 1813-1815” that liberated Germany from Napoleon – rather, it reflected the hypocrisy of the politics at that time.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1833, MONUMENT TO THE FALLEN BAVARIANS.
Davenport 570, KM 763, Thun 62, AKS 129, J.44.
Commemorative - for the 30000 Bavarians who lost their lives in the Russian campaigns.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: DENKMAHL DER DREYSSIG TAUSEND BAYERN WELCHE IM RUSSISCHEN KRIEGE DEN TOD FANDEN, Monument 1833 below.
NGC MS 62.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Clear fields, patchy patina, multiple friction marks on reverse - uncirculated and attractive coin.
View Coin Davenport 571 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1834 BAVARIA - LEGISLATURE 571 NGC MS 63 PL “Ehre Dem Ehre Geburt - Honor to Whom Honor is Due” - this phrase echoed incessantly through the mind of King Ludwig, not giving him a moment’s peace. Who was it that had said it? Romans 13:7, Apostle Paul… With a deep breath, Ludwig tried to regain some concentration. He was listening to the presentation of the new Minister of the Interior, Count Louis of Oettingen-Wallerstein regarding the sorting of duties within the Parliament as well as throughout all of Bavaria. The new Minister proved to be quite aggressive - in a short period of time, he had already established a reputation as a radical mind, not tolerating any sort of liberalism. This was in stark contrast to the former Minister, the old and prudent Johann Baptist von Sturmer. “Honor to Whom Honor is Due”, or to rephrase “Each gets what he deserves”… “Hah! My Father Max surely outdid himself with his acclaimed Constitution. Not only that, he founded the Parliament or Landtag in 1819 - it was originally intended to serve as a coexistence of two Houses, the upper and the lower. The Upper House consisted of members of the aristocracy and royal families, together with government officials and higher-status landowners. The Lower House - that was truly the source of troubles and weeds of dissent, for it included the representatives of small landowners, peasants, townspeople, and uneducated folk.” Ludwig exhaled and kept listening to the speaker. “Let us remember what had occurred on the first of March 1831! Your Majesty surely remembers that disgraceful Landtag! Hours upon hours spent and still the Parliament could not reach any sort of agreement! Eduard von Schenk and his cabinet created an utter chaos that day, and instead of building a new foundation of Law and Prosperity they build an opposition, closer to anarchy! Thanks to the honorable Johann Baptist von Sturmer the liberals infiltrated all of the houses of Landtag! The laughable "freedom of speech" ended up as a freedom for dirty accusations and criticisms of the government! For yellow newspapers, for liars! They even dared to cut the funding for our noble military, our strength! Even the royal budget of Your Majesty was touched with their filthy hands - and what about the poor contractors who already completed their work and never received any payment? Our Upper House is growing so tired of vetoing all of the wretched initiatives from the Lower House, and eventually the entire lawmaking procedure will be reduced to chaos. Look at what happened to Poland in December - they suffered an uprising! The Polish Sejm was forced to collapse and stop its functioning. This is unacceptable, I vow to end the disgusting fight for power that comes at the expense of our beloved Bavaria! My Landtag 1834 will be a truly different story, where everything and everybody is in agreement. The projects of our law will be both viable and sustainable - no more liberals! No more opposition! Enough is enough!” …”Ehre Dem Ehre Gebuhrt” - thought Ludwig, “doesn’t sound like a bad motto for a new Taler, for the united Landtag!” He sighed with relief. Enough politics and bad news! He had already quit listening to the presenter, painting in his imagination the delicate details and contours of the newest coin, replete with the kingly profile of Ludwig I of Bavaria.
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And so the liberal Landtag did not survive under the lobbying pressure of the government and aristocracy. After the Polish Uprising in December, the repression had started. The Temporary Liberal Government of Johann Baptist von Sturmer was replaced by the radical team belonging to Count Louis of Oettingen-Wallerstein. The new government began to censor and repress the publishing freedom of the press, resulting in the banning of almost all newspapers in opposition. Due to the high risk of a people’s uprising, the military was sent to the Province of Rhine. Furthermore, many people fell under arrest or exile - mostly leaders of the liberal opposition. The repression did, however, help the Parliament as the new Landtag in 1834 was entirely free of dissent. But this came at the expense of the people, and the dark seed of future revolution was already planted in the fertile Bavarian soil.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1834, LEGISLATURE.
Davenport 571, KM 765A (405), Thun 63, AKS 130, J.45.
Commemorative - in honor of legislature of 1834.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: EHRE DEM EHRE GEBUHRT, wreath with oak leaves, LANDTAG 1834 inside.
NGC MS 62 PL.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Proof strike, mirror fields, some hairlines - spectacular coin.
View Coin Davenport 572 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver TALER 1834 BAVARIA - MONUMENT 572 NGC MS 62
The royal hunt was in full swing. Horses galloped fiercely, champing at their bits, while dogs barked and horns rang shrilly in the crisp air; in the distance, the faint silhouette of a fleeing deer faded further from the royal hunting party. King Ludwig I of Bavaria flew over the fields upon his raven-colored steed, downright reveling in the thrill of the pursuit, wind beating against his face, and uncontainable excitement bubbling in his belly, which only the true hunter can recognize in tenacious pursuit of his fleeing prey. He felt so caught up in the heat of the moment that he soon found himself in a dark wood, with the sounds of the trailing party far-off in the distance. In time he recognized that he would find himself all alone in the unnavigable woods, heading in an unknown direction. All around him he beheld such beauty, as birds madly filled the air with their piercing songs, and as the unmistakable fragrance of flowers coursed upwards like invisible fire, that it seemed that the King had lost his head and forgot about all, surrendering entirely to the thunderstorm within his mind. Gradually the horse slowed to a trot, continuing on its forward course, occasionally casting quick backwards glances at the rider upon his sturdy back, lost to himself in dreamlike reverie. Soon the sentinel trunks started to thin and Ludwig arrived at a clearing where the peasants’ wheat fields had their rim and boundary. The King looked around… the place seemed to present itself as increasingly familiar to him. In the distance he beheld the sorrowful ruins of some ancient keep, containing a moderately sized Gothic church dome, as though growing from the remnants of walls and other forgotten structures. “It cannot be” - thought Ludwig suddenly and galloped in the direction of the old castle. Nearing the ruins, the King again cast his gaze in every which direction. He could have no doubt: before him lay the ruins of the former place of origin of the Wittelsbach family, the Burg Wittilinesbach, destroyed in 1209 following the murder of King Philip of Swabia by the vengeful Count Otto of Wittelsbach. In any case, thus sayeth the family legend. The King approached the walls and placed his jeweled hand upon the warm, overgrown mossy stones from a distant age - almost as from an opened barrel did the childhood memories flood through him. He remembered the tales told by his father of the might of the former Wittelsbach clan, of the brutally long war, of the family citadel that had collapsed into utter damnation over the centuries… and suddenly from behind he heard the din of galloping horses, as his hunter’s party approached - one among them sped towards his King, evidently troubled by having lost his Majesty in the wood. Ludwig positively shone towards the approaching huntsman, “Behold, Hans! These worthy ruins! Once this was an imperturbable fortress, wherein resided the dynasties of kings! Here were born future kings! Here were decided the fates of kingdoms! And what now, merely stones and blossoms. Our life is this way… today you are the hero and the pinnacle of human will to power, deciding the destinies of others, and tomorrow - only ruins shall remain and future generations shan’t even remember you.” Bowing before the King, the aged huntsman replied, “Your Highness, in this region of Bavarian Swabia lie the greatest wetlands for hunting, especially following the ruinous death of the castle… do you not desire to continue the hunt? We have lost our way to the side, for the moment.” Ludwig quickly acquiesced, “Of course, of course,” mounting his horse once again. Departing from the castle, nevertheless again the King cast his gaze behind him at the green-stained ruins that stood shrouded in dense trees and even denser mystery. “Burg Wittilinesbach… what a splendid name for a castle! The place where my ancestors lived positively cannot be left in ruins lost in the woods. I, the King of the land, will not allow it. The castle shall be rebuilt and returned to its royal dynasty.” - together with these thoughts the King galloped forth out of the clearing, tenderly bearing them as precious mental cargo, gaining speed and soon rejoining the remainder of the hunting party.
“Your Highness!” Exclaimed the royal treasurer with worry as he eyed the document that contained the preliminary plans for the renovation of the castle with the preliminary budget and fiscal estimates… “our treasury does not contain such a sum! You would have to heighten taxes or take a loan from the bank. We had already spent more than necessary on the construction and revitalization of Your capital - Munich. And even the senate would not approve the renovation of a crumbling old pile of stone - thus it was during the times of Your great-grandfather, then they also wanted to reinstate the castle but in the end could only construct a church, and even then not a large one. Even so, the castle is too large to be a museum, and surrounded by such dense forest…” - the treasurer returned the document to the King. Sighing resolutely, the King began, “Of course, we cannot raise taxes - the last thing we need is a popular uprising, but what to do? We cannot allow for my familial nest of origin to grow shrouded in grasses and shrubs! That is the memory of the Wittelsbach dynasty!” All of a sudden the Queen, Teresa, entered the conversation. “Darling!” She had long listened intently and with keen interest to the lively discussion between the two men - “Maybe we do not need to rush! The ruins will not grow any more ruined in our lifetimes, and we, over time, can amass the necessary sum that the renovation demands. And while we lack the money, in the meantime we can simply install some sort of monument upon the ruins, for instance, something in Gothic style, so that it looks complementary to the church.” Ludwig beamed and replied in the affirmative, “Very well. Today I shall rendezvous with Daniel Olmueller and shall order the construction of a new family monument. And furthermore, we shall issue a new Taler - for even if we shan’t get the chance to restore the ruins to their former glory, the monument and the Taler will bear witness to future generations that there once existed a great royal family that lived in a grand castle! Mazel tov!”
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And so be it! On a ruins of the familial castle of Wittelsbach near Aichach in today’s Bavarian Swabia one can still see lonely gothic monument of the Royal Family. In 1929 King Ludwig collected pledges of loyalty from people all around Bavaria and on 25th of August 1832 the foundation for the monument were built. Final opening ceremony happened on August 25, 1834. But what about “Burg Wittilinesbach”? Well, still in ruins.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1834, Royal Family Monument.
Davenport 572, KM 765(406), Thun 64, AKS 131, J.46.
Commemorative - for the erection of a monument in loyalty to the reigning family.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK.
Reverse: DENKMAHL DER ANHAENGLICHKEIT BAYERNS AN SEINEN HERRSCHERSTAMM ERRICHTET ZU OBERWITTELSBACH, Monument, 1834 below.
NGC MS 62.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Attractive dark bronze patina, mirror fields, spectacular-looking coin!!
View Coin Davenport 573 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver TALER 1835 BAVARIA - CUSTOMS UNION 573 PCGS MS 64 Friedrich Boeckh, the Minister of Finance of the Duchy of Baden, looked around the room that was filled with people. He was faced with a difficult task today - to convince the parliamentarians sitting in front of him of the need to reunite with the Zollverein, or the United Germany. The problem of reunification has long hung over the Duchy like the sword of Damocles - neighboring Bavaria, along with Prussia and Wurttemberg, all tightened their tariffs tighter and it seemed like the little Duchy had no choice. But politicians, businessmen, farmers, and nobles held a different opinion - most of them did not want to fall under the dictatorship of the Prussian crown, especially when it came to the political and economic freedom of their native state. There was a tough battle of words and Herr Boeckh was ready to fight to the end - it was always his dream from a very young age, as he argued with his friend Nebenius about the distant time when a strong Germany would revive from difficult post-war years with uniform borders, fair tariffs, a standard currency - all that will provide free trade and a powerful economy. And his native Baden deserved all this - Boeckh remembered how it all began then, in the distant post-Napoleonic 1815-1817 years. The devastation following the war, the decline of the economy - Baden only survived through imports. Wine, tobacco, hemp, hops, and cattle flowed across the borders into nearby lands, providing farmers and traders with at least some form of income. Then, in the 1820s, under pressure from their eternal neighbors/competitors (Bavaria and Wurttemberg), things became worse. The South German Customs Union overlaid them with tariffs, and smuggling began to flourish; smugglers were operating along the entire border passing through the Black Forest, doing a much better job of glorifying this ancient forest throughout Germany than the Grimm Brothers fairy tales. In exchange for contraband, a great wealth of foreign goods flowed into Baden, such as Swiss watches and chocolate, Dutch cheeses, etc - as if its own German produce were not enough! Furthermore, it got worse! Tariffs surrounding the Baden German states finally squeezed the economy's throat - especially after the formation of the Three Customs Unions - thanks to the efforts of King Ludwig I of Bavaria. Then both Ludwig-Bavarian and Ludwig-the Herzog-Baden did not agree; Baden was still in splendid isolation. Old Gross Herzog Ludwig was generally cautious in making decisions, especially when it came to free trade and the territorial issue - he knew that the "Big brother" of Bavaria had long been claiming a piece of the territory of Baden. It got to the point that in May 1828, a secret meeting of the Parliament (in Two Baden Chambers) took place in order to deliver an ultimatum to the Duke - to unite with the Three Customs Unions - and ultimately failed. Even with the involvement of the King of Prussia in 1830, it was useless - Baden could not merge with the Customs Union of Bavaria and Wurttemberg - the territorial claims of Bavaria hindered this and the smuggling through the Black Forest did not diminish. Hard times befell Baden. It got to the point that in May 1831 the Parliament was again gathered for a secret meeting to ask the help of the King of Prussia to take the unfortunate state under its wing. But Frederick Willhelm III already had big plans in mind for Bavaria, for Wurttemberg, and for the rest of Germany. Already born and growing, destroying all borders, was the single Union of German Lands - the Zollverein - the dream of all advanced economists and politicians: a mighty, united Germany! And Baden was again as if beside the point - ongoing smuggling, along with the ambitions of the Duke. It is time to end this! Boeckh glanced around the quiet hall and began his speech: "Brothers! Fellow citizens! Fellow countrymen! Our State is in danger! Once a blooming country, we now perish in isolation! We have lost imports from neighboring German states, we are stifled by tariffs, and we will not be able to survive at the expense of a single smuggling! We have no choice but to reunite with the Zollverein!"
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The Minister of Finance had to spend a lot of effort to convince the advanced public of Baden the need for a Union with German Lands. Politicians did not want to lose state control, traders did not want to lose smuggling profits, and the common people did not want to deal with Prussia and its laws. But there was no longer any choice and in October 1834 the historic meeting of the three states took place in Munich. After years of battle, an agreement on mutual economic boundaries was signed between Bavaria, Wurttemberg, and Baden. The last details were agreed and in May 1835 Baden became part of the Zollverein. This started a new page in the life of the state. As for our Ludwig I of Bavaria, by that time he had already prepared a sketch of the new Commemorative Taler - in memory of the admission of Baden to the Customs Union.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1835, Baden - Custom Union.
Davenport 573, KM 766(407), Thun 65, AKS 132, J.47.
Commemorative - for the addition of Baden to the German Customs Union.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK.
Reverse: BEYTRITT VON BADEN ZUM TEUTSCHEN ZOLLVEREIN 1835, caduceus in sprays.
PCGS MS 64.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Attractive golden patina with dark bronze rainbow at the edges, mirror fields, spectacular-looking coin!!
View Coin Davenport 574 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1835 BAVARIA - MORTGAGE BANK 574 NGC MS 63 As King Ludwig sat in is luxurious office, he looked on grimly to the disheveled stacks of uncountable papers upon his mail desk. “Difficult it is to be a king, for everybody seeks something from you, all await your decisions in strained anticipation, always writing petitions and entreaties of some sort.. they will nail you to your desk and force decision-making straight out of your head.” With a labored exhalation, the King looked on to the Minister’s standing figure before him. This was Ludwig Kraft Ernst, the Minister of the Interior and the Prince of Oettingen-Wallerstein. “Here, Ludwig,” - he began aloud - “look over these petitions again, these documents, for it is again time to make decisions for the good of the realm.. Would you by chance be of assistance to me in sorting out what’s what here?” Upon saying this, King Ludwig leaned back upon his splendid chair in utter exhaustion. “Well of course, Your Highness!” Exclaimed Ludwig Oettingen-Wallerstein as he bowed deeply before the depleted sovereign. “In fact, it is all very simple, for your subjects again entreat you for money! These petitions are, after all, from the Bavarian Peasants’ League,” he said, pointing to the papers aggressively stacked and growling ink upon the King’s table. The King protested, "but they always petition for more money, even from the times of my father! And we always took it upon ourselves to lend them our aid - to our farmers, especially following the Napoleonic War - do you not remember that destruction? Our coffers are not bottomless; we need to figure out how to aid the farmers and to extract some benefit for ourselves, for the government.. To create, for instance, a league of financial assistance, and to attract other wealthy benefactors - for in Bavaria we have plenty of rich folk! Let them help, and lighten the burden upon the shoulders of the Monarch!” With a smile of tremendous respect, Ludwig Oettingen-Wallerstein exclaimed, “Golden words, your Majesty!” With a bow, he offered several documents that he held in his hands. “In fact, I have brought to you the Charter of a new organization - a financial organization, a Bank. If you recollect our past discussions on this matter, I have finally brought to you the refined final copy of this Charter.” The King’s eyes shone as he seized the paperwork and began to scan it with fantastic intent, “Interesting... Mortgage, credit, insurance, bonds - could you please explain some of this unintelligible jargon for me?” The Minister of the Interior stepped in, “it is all very simple, Your Highness! The bank is designed to specialize in the issuing of credit for land purchases - to assist the farmers. It will necessitate sixty percent of the nation’s capital, leaving 40% for other governmental aims - to help industrial development and the building of roads, and to simply lend to Bavarians. We will also help our wealthy compatriots by establishing a fine percentage for their contributions, issuing securities which they later could exchange for money and profit. All benefit and the bank receives profit which then gets divided between stockholders.” “Very interesting!” brightly exclaimed the King, “and I, as the Monarch, could also become a stockholder?” “Of course, your Majesty,” replied the Minister, “you with your accumulated wealth can become the main shareholder! Although, the most important detail to remember is...” After a momentary pause for effect, the Minister continued, “this bank will be a solid establishment under the protection of your Crown. This will give investors tremendous security and they will deliver their money sure-heartedly!” The King brightened considerably to this, crying, “How genial!” He arose, growing to the peak of his height, “A governmental, national and simultaneously wealthy bank for the glory of Bavaria! This incredibly patriotic institution will protect the farmers, artisans and tradesmen against usurpers, helping them to meet their loan-related needs at the bright dawn of revolution in agriculture and industry! This is truly a matter worthy of the King!” And so King Ludwig, bending his luxurious raiments over the desk, left his ornate signature upon the Charter of the new Bank.
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And so it was that by this proclamation the Hypo-Bank was born on the 15th of October 1835. It became known as the “Central Bank of Bavaria” and it was the first bank that had the right to issue paper currency. King Ludwig himself was a primary shareholder, providing 400,000 of the initial capital investment of ten million gulden. The creation of the Hypo-Bank was probably one of the most important actions taken by King Ludwig on behalf of the Bavarian people. It provided long-term financing of industrial loans on a mortgage basis, which indeed helped national industrialization greatly. What’s interesting about the Hypo-Bank is that it was the first bank designated to underwrite insurance, an absolute novelty at the time. The famous German historian Kramer wrote that “it was the most wise and charitable order for the consequences it brought forth. The founding of the Mortgage Bank, becoming the national bank of the Bavarian royalty, became the apex of authentic royal foresight and wisdom.”
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig I Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1835, MORTGAGE BANK.
Davenport 574, KM 777 (408), Thun 66, AKS 133, J.48.
Commemorative - for the establishment of the Bavarian Mortgage Bank.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: ERRICHTUNG DER BAYERISCHEN HYPOTHEKEN-BANK, female figure leaning on pedestal, 1835 below.
NGC MS 63.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Attractive patina, mirror rainbow fields, uncirculated and beautiful coin.
View Coin Davenport 575 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1835 BAVARIA - OTTO MONUMENT 575 PCGS MS 62 A sleepless night had snared the Queen. Her heart became swallowed by fire with the mere thought alone that on the morrow she would be forced to part with her dear child, her dearest little Otto, for a long time or even forever. Casting their gaze from the high window into the vast December darkness of the night, her wet eyes could see nothing and no-one except for the countenance of her beloved son. She perceived the tiny rosy-cheeked smile of his youngest years, his crawling on all fours down the endless corridors of the royal palace, his playfully frantic attempts to evade and escape from his royal servants… and his first lessons at riding on horseback - such a genuine and beautiful young Prince, fair and kind down to his very core.

“For Thou art a kind and loving God! Speed Thy help and fortitude to my dearest Otto!” - soundlessly whispered the lips of the stricken Queen - “For he is yet so young, innocent, and untested to be given reign over an entire sovereign nation! O Greece! Such a unfamiliar faraway land with unfamiliar characters, speaking a unfamiliar language and praying unfamiliar prayers over faded icons of unfamiliar saints in their darkened underground places of unfamiliar worship! How is he to rule over them, to lead them? Who is to aid his hand there, so far from the wisdom of his familial guardians? Only Thee, O Lord!” - and thus she silently continued to weep and pray, pray and weep.

Frigid night shrouded the town of Aibling, the final frigid night to be spent in Bavaria - after which only God would know the whereabouts of her dearly beloved son. The Queen Theresa desired to be together with her son until the final moment - and the final moment had cruelly arrived. For tomorrow her Otto would depart with a cavalry unit into the distant South and she would be left to return to the hollow palace and to spill the sacred tears of an inconsolable and truly loving mother.
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The Prince Otto had left the country of his birth prior even to his own Coming of Age and returned to Germany 30 years hence, a balding failed monarch that fled the throne and lost the crown of a country he adored - only to die in Bavaria, the land of his mother, who did not see her son triumph as he had in her dreams. Up to that moment, the efforts of the inhabitants of Aibling with the help of King Ludwig had produced a proud monument to Theresa the Mother, who had lost her son to another land for ever. The first stone of the foundation was placed into the ground on the fifteenth of October on the birthday of King Ludwig, and on the first of June 1835 - Otto’s twentieth birthday and the commencement of his rule as monarch of Greece - the magnificent monument was complete. With sharp edges and contours and in Gothic styling, it gloriously personified the bottomless depth of a mother’s enduring love. Etched in gold upon the plaque were the immortal words: 
“Theresa the Queen of Bavaria wept bitter tears  in parting with her beloved son Otto. O how she would rather they had been tears of joy! 
"Otto, second son of Ludwig I of Bavaria, here shattered the heart of his mother that he may be King and savior of Greece.”
“Inhabitants of the land of Rosenheim, and sympathetic women from all over Bavaria have here immortalized the sacrificial love of the Queen-Mother"
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In the present day, if one were to visit the moderately-sized town of Bad-Aibling and to stroll along the river shore, smelling the fragrant aroma of spring flowers - one would come across a beautiful Gothic monument from which gazes a forlorn woman, pressing to her bosom a young child. Either this is the Birthgiver of God Mary Herself holding the infant Jesus, or it is the melancholy Theresa clutching at young Otto her babe — regardless, this is a monument to all mothers and their eternal love towards their children, the beauty and majesty of which is like nothing else on Earth! 
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1835, OTTO MONUMENT .
Davenport 575, KM 778 (409), Thun 67, AKS 134, J.49.
Commemorative - for the separation of the Queen Therese from Her son, King Otto of Greece.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: DENKM. DER TRENNUNG DER KOEN. THERESE VON IHREM SOHNE DEM KOEN. OTTO, ERRICHTET BEI AIBLING VON BAYERISCHEN FRAUEN, Monument 1835 below.
PCGS MS 62.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Clear mirror fields, patchy patina, touch of rainbow toning - uncirculated and attractive coin.
View Coin Davenport 576 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver TALER 1835 BAVARIA - FIRST RAILWAY 576 NGC MS 61 .....The locomotive “Eagle” sent out a piercing blast on its horn to signal its commencement, causing the platform to shake; this so startled King Ludwig of Bavaria he reflexively grabbed the handrail in surprise. Instantly composing himself, he shot a glance at the surrounding crowd - it is unbecoming of a King to show surprise and vulnerability in public. Fortunately, the surrounding noise and commotion quickly masked his embarrassment. Slowly, the train heaved and began to pick up speed; trees would lazily swim across the windows, as did the dainty houses upon the lakeshore. Again the train let out a bright horn blast, shrouding the passengers in a haze of steam mixed with smoke from the coal-burner engine. Within his heart, Ludwig nurtured a peculiar feeling at this moment. It was a elegant blend of fear and worry with bubbling elation. Praise the English! For they had conceived the iron horse, an intimidating machine capable of moving itself along with passengers and freight. Ludwig looked over to the stern profile of the conductor, Mr. Wilson, whose gazed fixedly at a great distance and clutched expertly at the train’s control lever mechanisms. The sight of man and machine so enthralled the King that for a moment, he became unable to tell apart where the machine ends and the man begins… it truly was an otherworldly sight. “Man and the machine - there truly is something divine within this image, like the ancient chimeras…” His wandering thoughts carried him into the distance accompanied by the rhythmic clapping of the great metal wheels upon the track. “And in the end who knows, perhaps it is not such a bad idea… railroads… it’s an expensive luxury and one won’t haul all that much. For the metal beast eats a great amount of coal, which must then be delivered on horseback from as far as Ruhr… but for the time being, I will make it work.” He still believed the better method to transport goods is by water, across the Ludwig Canal… but experiencing the might of the iron horse gave the King certain doubts. The hardworking “Eagle” train billowed its white smoke into the air and slowly with sure speed pulled its two cars up the grade of a mountain. “And in the end,” thought the King, “without my protection this railroad would not have been constructed in a long time, and I even permitted the use of my name in its naming - ‘the Ludwig South-North Railway’!” He remembered how in the far-off years of the 20s, inspired by the idea of building a self-propelled machine, he sent the young engineer Joseph von Baader to England to study the science of railways. He also recalled how in 1825 the new Parliament spent time discussing the construction project, ending in the authorized building of an experimental railway, the short Nuremburg-Furth Road. He had to pay in addition some 50,000 Guldens out of the treasury because the 132,000 Guilders amassed by George Zachariah Platner were not enough. Again Ludwig gazed through his window - the tracks had banked under the mountain and the locomotive began to pick up speed. Somewhere within, Ludwig sensed a deep enjoyment and thrill towards the act of motion, the machine smell in the air, and the metallic rhythms from the wheels upon the track filling the air with a wonderful resonance. The lovely romanticism of the railroad had gripped the heart of King Ludwig fiercely. “There! It is decided,” he thought, “that tomorrow I will purchase several shares of the Railway Company, for a bright future lies in the nation’s railroads. And just as well, I must order a new Taler to celebrate this wonder of human ingenuity!” Upon resolving his mind through this thought, he lowered the back of his seat and continued to gaze outward at the rolling pastures of beautiful Germany.
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The first railroad in Germany was opened on the seventh of December 1835. It was 6 km in length and joined together the towns of Nuremberg and Furth. Stephenson’s Company in England had built the steam locomotive “Adler” (Eagle) and delivered it to Bavaria along with Mr. Wilson, its conductor. The conductor’s salary at that time was 1500 Guilders per year - this was more than the salary of the Company’s Director. The engine within the train had a horsepower rating of 10 and could move at a speed of 18 kilometers per hour. It had the ability to make 6-7 trips a day. The Nuremberg-Furth trip took approximately 25 minutes by horse-and-carriage and about 15 minutes by train. The price for a ticket was 12 kreuzers. With time, the freight traffic had grown from the transportation of beer and newspapers to general freight and mail in 1840. This resulted in unbelievable profits, although strong competition from horse-powered cars eventually caused business to decline. Ludwigbahn was eventually closed in 1922, and in 1938, the original Furth station was torn down by the Nazi regime to build a square for parades. In the present day, this original road is again open, and the contemporary super-locomotives of the Nuremberg U-Bahn fly according to the old route, as it was 150 years ago when King Ludwig stepped upon the platform for the first time and beheld the newest wonder of the industrial age - the iron horse upon its parallel track.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1835, FIRST RAILWAY .
Davenport 576, KM 779 (410), Thun 68, AKS 135, J.50.
Commemorative - for the opening first steam railway in Germany.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: ERSTE EISENBAHN IN TEUTSCHLAND MIT DAMPFWAGEN VON NÜRNBERG NACH FURTH, female figure, ERBAUT and 1835 below.
NGC MS 61.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Uncirculated and lustrous, excessive hairlines on obverse, clear mirror fields on reverse.
View Coin Davenport 577 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. King Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1835 BAVARIA - SHORT SCEPTER MAXIMILIAN MONUMENT 577 PCGS MS 64 "... Upon the Stage proceeded a magical turn of events, as the soft moonlight flowed and intermingled with music. Tristan, wringing his hands, sang of his love for Isolde, creating the legendary romantic aura that a person can behold only at the Opera House. Thus King Ludwig, succumbing to this mood, plunged into the sweet dreamlike haze carried farther and farther away. Today his reveries regarded the greatness of the Bavarian people and how He, the King, will transform his native Bavaria into the worldwide capital of the Muses. Ludwig has already seen beautiful palaces and majestic fountains, art galleries in which artists and poets read poems on every patio, sounds of violin and harpsichord intermingling with opera divas, as philosophers stand ready to argue with you endlessly about the essence of existence. "I will continue the work of my father - Papa Maximilian will surely be proud of his Augustus son." Tears welled in Ludwig's eyes. "However, it will not be a simple task," the Monarch continued to think, "Max-Joseph managed to do a great deal in his life." He freed us from Napoleon, wrote the Constitution, made Bavaria an Independent State, established the Academy of Fine Arts, and even built the National Opera Theater so that he, Ludwig, needs now to think about how to etch his father's name on the slates of history. Yes, and the people loved Papa Max, calling him "the King-Benefactor”... Gradually, Ludwig's thoughts took another turn - he will perpetuate the name of Maximilian and erect a Monument to him, as in Munich there still is no good monument to the King-Benefactor - how will the people remember him without a monument.”-.. and with these thoughts the King again plunged into the realm of music, leaving everything as ideas to be sought for later.

“But there is a Monument!”- Christian Daniel Rauch, the Court Sculptor and Arrchitect, respectfully bowed before the King - “..the project would have been completed by von Klenze and Johann Martin von Wagner during King Maximilian's life, but His Majesty aborted the project. He did not like the fact that He was sitting in a chair like some kind of weak old man; thus, the project was sent back for revision, and then He began falling ill - in general, He was no longer interested in the preoccupation of the Monument. This way the monument project stayed unfinished in the air... "Show me the project" - Ludwig inclined himself over a piece of paper - "I don't know, I don't know, my dear Christian, to me Papa Max looks more imposing here - his baton, the outstretched hand ... He looks like a Roman Emperor tired of fighting and leading his army on the way to Victory! What other monument did He want? There already is one of him riding a horse - my great-great-grandfather Maximilian I. But to portray him standing in thought - this is how we have in Munich, there are many monuments of figures standing thoughtfully. No, dear Christian, let him sit and be sitting in front of the Theater in the Square named after Him! Today, inform Herr Johann Baptist Stiglmaier to start casting the statue. Also transfer the project to the Mint - let the memorial Taler be minted - my father should be etched in history in silver and bronze!”…

The monument to Papa Maximilian Joseph is still standing (or rather sitting) in front of the National Theater. The Grand Opening of the Monument took place on October 13th, 1835. King Ludwig personally attended the ceremony, proclaiming the installation of the monument as a manifestation of the gratitude and heartful love of the Munich citizens towards the King-Benefactor. Although the common people loved Papa Max, the fact that money collected from taxes was used to pay for the Monument did not sit well with many. Rumors about the King's excessive predilection towards high Art at the expense of taxpayers have already spread across the country, but we will talk about this in the near future - when times of trouble and revolution will soon cover Germany in their dark web.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1835, MAX MONUMENT .
Davenport 577, KM 780.2 (411.2), Thun 69, AKS 136, J.51.
Commemorative - for the Monument to King Maximilian Joseph erected by the city of Munich.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: DENKMAHL DES KOENIGS MAXIMILIAN JOSEPH ERRICHTET VON DER HAUPTSTADT MUNCHEN, seated figure and 1835 below.
Short scepter variety.
PCGS MS 64.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Golden irridiscence more on reverse, some hairlines in the fields, uncirculated and collectible gem.
View Coin Davenport 578 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1835 BAVARIA - BENEDIC. SCHOOL 578 NGC MS 63 Again Ludwig found himself in longing. Since the early hours of the morning, he strolled through the never-ending halls of the palace and tried thinking of how to busy his time. No, the King had plenty of duties, but Ludwig felt the special urge for something important, something befitting his royal attention. “Perhaps another new Taler?” The mere brush of this recurring mental image always filled Ludwig with a cavernous joy, guiding His Majesty’s flowing thoughts in a novel direction without fail. Of course, now the question arose as to what matter is so worthy of a shining new coin, yet a block sat on his creativity and no formidable ideas arose as of yet. Long did the King wander the hallways in craving of something worthy of his energy, a idea worth bringing to life in metal and heat and human ingenuity. 

He had just about corrupted his mood completely until he was informed of the presence of a visitor. Not just any visitor, either - a monk, replete with urgent business. Ludwig had always regarded the monastic life and its individuals with caution and almost a respectful fear, as he himself had always strove to be in accordance with the will of God; he attended confession and holy communion, strove to include and aid all faith in Germany (including even the Protestants!), and eagerly donated money for the construction of cathedrals and shrines. Such edifices were prior thrown into ruin during the secularization occurring under the troops of Napoleon Bonaparte. Yet Ludwig always felt wary of monks, especially those belonging to the Benedictine Order, to whom he harbored little trust. These monks in their black robes would evoke a feeling of terror deep in the pit of Ludwig’s heart, a feeling often misunderstood by the man himself - and thus he avoided such individuals rather deliberately. “Bah, let’s see what he has to say.” 

Of course Ludwig knew that the monk would be asking for financial aid, in the undertaking of a grand construction scheme under divine destiny. As the King approached, dark and unknowable eyes shot him a glance from under a weighty black hood and fat fingers nervously handled a worn rosary - it had seemed that the King was not the only man anxious to be in the presence of another. “Your Highness! The Jesuits again are preparing a petition to take back Thy School, the Augsburg Gymnasium, to return it to the oversight of the Jesuit St. Salvator College. This must not happen! From the beginning it had been our Monastery of St. Stephan, founded in 969 by the Bishop of Augsburg St. Ulrich himself - your Highness, please help return this building to us! We intend to renovate the ancient establishment and to sing collective prayers and praises to the monarch responsible for the rebirth of our home. Thou hast already done so much for our beloved Order; please come to our aid yet again!”

The King thought to himself - it is not difficult to remember the vast expenses, the 1.9 million guilders reserved for the construction of monasteries, as the Cathedral and Monastery of Saint Boniface in Munich alone ran up to almost a million. Yes, the country healed from Napoleon at great cost, from a time where monasteries and lands were brutally seized from their inhabitants. The King let out an extended breath, the likes of which was almost instantly mirrored by the equally apprehensive man of God, who continued to fidget restlessly with his rosary. Ludwig too believed in God and believed that He had given him the kingly power for a certain sacred aim or design, and perhaps the renovation and renewal of holy buildings may have been his lifelong purpose. But alas, what an expensive revival!

This black-clad monk is trying to lay hands on what is his, his Grammar School - he personally saw to the renovation of St. Stephan’s monastery and its re-emergence as a school for children. A question suddenly flashed across the King’s mind - “And what of the children?” The monk retorted, “Do not worry yourself, Your Highness! Our Order always prided itself on its eagerness to work with and raise the next generation.The School will stay established as is, and any and all responsibility for education will be taken by our grateful Order, with God’s help!” Lowering his eyes, the monk began whispering a prayer, effectively leaving any remaining conversation in the hands of the King.

Perhaps it is indeed the best course of action to hand over the jurisdiction of the School to the Benedictine Order, as it may mean less work for a Kingly mind for equal benefit to all involved. Eyeing the monk, the King exclaimed, “Then it is decided, I shall give unto you the School, but under one condition - you will teach not only theology in this place of learning, but also other advanced sciences like philosophy, mathematics, poetry, etc. You are responsible for the nurturing of a mentally bright and powerful generation to bring our Bavaria forward into a better future!” 

Rising, the King concluded the meeting and thought to himself, and here we have an excellent reason for the production of a brand new coin - Germany under royal volition transfers government control of a center of education to the Church of St. Benedict! Germany will be portrayed by an ordinary woman in Greek clothing, with monks and children! The King’s mood and day had brightened tremendously!
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A former Catholic Jesuit College was rebuilt by citizens donating almost 30,000 guilders, which was purchased by Ludwig I of Bavaria with the blessing of Bishop Ignatz Albert of Riegg, and was reopened to the public on November 20. But King Ludwig soon forbade the readmission of Jesuits and transferred the jurisdiction over the school to the Benedictine Order instead, even without consultation with the Pope, and restored the Benedictine Order in Bavarian Swabia after secularization. On the 5th of November 1835, the Constitution of the Monastery of St. Stephan took place and the Benedictine Seminary opened its doors. It still exists at the present day, though only as a day boarding school. All fourteen of the remaining Benedictine Monks work as teachers at the High School of St. Stephan, the St. Joseph Day Boarding School, as well as provide services ranging from nursing to artisanal craftsman activities.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1835, BENEDICTINE SCHOOL .
Davenport 578, KM 782 (412), Thun 70, AKS 137, J.52.
Commemorative - for the school given to the Benedictine Order.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: DEN BENEDIKTINERN WIEDER EINE LEHRANSTALT ÜBERGEBEN, Female figurine (Education) with two children and a monk, 1835 below.
NGC MS 63.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Clear fields, matching grade, uncirculated.
View Coin Davenport 579 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. King Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver TALER 1836 BAVARIA - OTTO CHAPEL 579 PCGS MS 63 The young prince Otto found himself looking sadly out through the carriage window, entranced by the blur of the treeline as it mingled with the rolling fields and lonely village houses of the pastoral Christians living their isolated yet pure lives in Upper Bavaria. No matter how sad it made him, to leave his native German land, they say that the duty of royalty rules above all else, and now he, in the company of his beloved elder brother Maximilian, found himself trembling with apprehension in an adorned carriage making its way along the road to faraway Greece, where he was destined to become king. Thus the sovereign monarchs of Europe decided and thus his father insisted; he simply could not possibly refuse their bidding. Laying behind him, in the ashes of his past, memories of his mother's tears, of bittersweet farewell balls thrown in grand regalia, of hollow congratulatory speeches, of his father's sad and bottomless and soulful eyes, and of the heavy hand of the father upon the shoulder of the son.. and what ahead? What but a distant and unknown country that itself has only just cast off the centuries-old shackles of the Ottoman Empire, a country set to ruin by war and unforgivable misfortune. Now he, a young monarch, will have to rule over these obscure and mystic people who wear their clothes in all black.. who kiss the faces of saints painted on ancient wooden boards.
In a moment, the silence vanished as Maximilian said, “Well, this is still Greece, the cradle of earthly civilization, the source of philosophical inspiration for countless great and terrible minds, for poets, for thinkers. You'll be perfectly fine there! After all those years under the dread Turkish yoke, the humble people have lost all hope of finding a true Christian monarch, and you, Otto, will be for them like a tasty sip of some true religious freedom. They will carry you in their arms!"
In his mind, the young king-to-be responded in a whisper of a thought, "..of course, it's easy for you to speak now," as he cast a quick glance at his brother. Maximilian as the Crown Prince will inherit the entire coveted throne of Bavaria and he, Otto, will get the sun-baked ruins of the Parthenon. 
"My dear Maximilian! All of the power of Greece only remains in books and statues; today's Greece has nothing to do with the divinity of Plutarch and Aristotle. The country rots in ruin after its horrific rape by the Turks! It will be necessary to rebuild both the palaces AND the consciousness of the people as a whole! And I am afraid that my three thousand brave Bavarian soldiers may not be enough to put things in order there" - and Otto, leaning back, again plunged into his mournful contemplation of the rolling landscape outside the carriage window. Gradually, either from fatigue or from the perpetually calm flickering of the treeline, his eyelids grew leaden and heavy and he forgot his thoughtful reveries as deeply and as quickly as the running of the mountain water in the myriad alpine streams which they had crossed along the way. 
The carriage shook, and Otto opened his eyes, looking at those few surrounding him - Maximilian was reading a book, and the rest of the attendants also went about their own business. The prince yet again returned his gaze through the carriage window as before, but there still flashed the selfsame picturesque landscapes of calm and forgiving forests and mountains. "How beautiful it all is in our country in Bavaria, all these forests, streams, mountains.. I will dearly miss all this there, over there, in that foreign and strange land!" Out of helpless desperation and loss of will did he utter this lamenting cry. "Yes, it's beautiful," said Maximilian, laying his book aside, "but I would say beautiful Austria, not Bavaria... we crossed the border not half an hour ago, in Kiefersfelden and are now in Austrian Tyrol - what on Earth is the matter with you, Otto!" he added hastily, seeing the pale face of his brother.
"Austria! Like Austria?!" the despondent prince cried out, "I overslept the border! I didn't even go out to say goodbye to my loved land! And you didn't even bother to wake me up! Stop! STOP! Stop the carriage!" - Otto found himself inconsolable. When the carriage stopped, the prince opened the door and jumped out onto the road with a look of pure determination in his sallow face. "I won't dare to leave without saying goodbye to my native Bavaria! Do whatever you want, but I'm returning to Kiefersfelden." With this, the young monarch quickly walked back in the direction of the border they had crossed not too long ago. 
Maximilian quickly realized that arguing with his brother would be useless; he sighed and waved his hand. The royal carriage slowly began to move, turning its wheels in obedient pursuit of its king and royal cargo.
When Ludwig found out about this little adventure, he felt supremely and overflowingly delighted. "My son! He is all from me and my own! I would also not have left, not without kissing my native land goodbye! What kind of city even was this - Kiefersfelden?? Ha ha, where, again? It matters not - this small town will now forever be known as it goes down in history as the place where King Otto said his final goodbyes to his native Bavaria and her ancestrally German soil! I will order the raising of a monument - no, better yet, a chapel upon this symbolic and sacred place! Let the people pray, and let them remember my son! Yes, and of course, without exception, you know what time it is -- we will make a new commemorative Thaler: to the glory of the King of Greece, my very own Otto!"
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Ludwig kept his royal word and diligently arranged for the completion of the new chapel's foundation, as they successfully started it on July 1st, 1834 at the celebration of the prince's nineteenth name-day. Two years later, in 1836, the construction was completed and the building was consecrated by the Archbishop in the presence of King Otto himself.
Ludwig personally arranged for the chapel's unique design, settling proudly on his favorite neo-Gothic style as portrayed through Olmüller, the esteemed architect of the court. And even today, a lone tourist traveling through the Tyrolean mountains on the border of Upper Bavaria suddenly finds himself in surprised forgetfulness standing before the captivating and hauntingly beautiful Gothic chapel that opens up in splendor and majesty before his very eyes, resting on a rolling mountainside on the banks of the endless river. The Chapel of St. Otto, as they say in the guidebooks - however, local old-timers will tell you over a glass of beer the story of the young king leaving his beloved native land, the one and only Otto, the King of Greece, the son of Ludwig, the First of Bavaria. 
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1836, OTTO CHAPEL.
Davenport 579, KM 786 (413), Thun 71, AKS 138, J.53.
Commemorative - for the erection of the Chapel on Otto departure to the Greece.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig I to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: BAYERN ERRICHTETEN DIE H. OTTOKAPELLE ZU KIEFERSFELDEN ZUM ANDENKEN AN KOEN. OTTO'S ABSCHIED V. SEINEM VATERLANDE. Chapel, 1836 below.
PCGS MS 63.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
Patchy champagne toning on clear mirror fields, amazing details of the portrait and chapel.
View Coin Davenport 580 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver TALER 1837 BAVARIA - ORDER OF MERIT 580 PCGS MS 64 A knife of pain dug itself between the ears of the greatest monarch who had ever lived. As King Ludwig I of Bavaria walked hastily through the marble hallways of his Royal Palace in Munich, he greatly regretted the intensity of the previous night yet tenderly kept a complete acceptance of its eventual return. The Bavarian morning shone brightly, and illumined the palace with rays of gold across every wall. There was work to be done… or so he thought.
The palace library was an enormous cavern of information and illumination, placed perfectly within the heart of the castle as purple and blue light floated from the stained glass windows through the air, fragrant with the smell of paper and wood. “Where is that old man? Ten minutes I’ve been stepping in circles around this labyrinth of books I would never dream of reading,” thought Ludwig to himself, beginning to feel the first sparks of frustration in his light-sensitive head. Echoes of the previous night drifted in and out of his thinking, yet the loud pain of a dozen beverages still pounded at the skull walls from within and he could not quite yet remember why he needed to come to this place after all.
At last, out of the corner of his eye he noticed the small doorway almost hidden to the rear of the library, and through the narrow stone hallway he entered a most small and cramped stone chamber. It appeared dim and shamelessly cluttered with books and scrolls, papers stacked to the ceiling and falling to the floor upon the slightest movement of the air. A small figure sat at a terribly messy desk facing away from the entryway where the One True King stood beautiful with gold and silver and sword and medallion; Günter Schleswig had tended the archives for decades upon decades, a grayed and ragged old man of seemingly infinite knowledge, his nose buried in a dense tome of an alien language. Without turning around, the respected elder softly exclaimed, “Good morning, Your Highness… how may an old withered soul be of help to you today?”
“Please, Günter, no need to get up,” muttered the King, “my business concerns the Order of Knights.” He leaned against the stone threshold of the doorway as Schleswig slowly rose up from his wooden seat; for a moment he thought he saw tiny avalanches of dust fall from his robed shoulders. From underneath impenetrable black eyebrows, eyes of gray steel met the eyes of the chosen monarch. “A most ancient and honorable Order, from the heart of St. Michael himself. What of it concerns you, Your Grace?”
Uneasily, Ludwig began, “A tremendous individual has impressed upon me, and I desire to reward his efforts and induct him into the highest ranks that Germany has to offer. I desire it.” With a knowing smile, the withered historian sharply asked, “Is he of the nobility?” His eyes dug into Ludwig’s with frightening intensity, daring the King to begin an argument. With false confidence, Ludwig asserted, “Yes, he is a tremendously noble person. His family, however, is of a different sort. Regardless, I desire his induction.” The King knew the power and respect that the elder Günter commanded in the court, and knew he needed to be careful. However, his pounding headache betrayed his weakened composure.
“If he is a Jew, you need not worry any further. I assure you that the honorable Prince-Archbishop Joseph Clemens of Cologne did not begin this prestigious order in the blessed year of 1693 to share it with the spawn of Abraham. Need I remind you that it is a brotherhood of Catholics? They would crucify themselves before sharing their medallion with the likes of those who crucified their Lord.” Shamelessly did the lover of knowledge fire his iron conviction, like an arrow into the heart of a weaker man.
Ludwig’s patience with the old was growing thinner with each passing word. “Regardless, most honorable Herr Schleswig, as the leading voice and reign of Bavaria, I, Ludwig the First, demand to induce Dr. Grunsfeld of Furth. He has earned the privilege.” Turning to the side, the robed elder reached his twisted claws into a pile of books and pulled another most-heavy tome and loudly brought it down onto the table by the candlelight. Turning ancient pages with an ancient hand, the ancient librarian spoke from underneath the hood, “Grunsfeld does not belong. It is written here in the archives of Clemens, that to hold the rank of Grand Cross and Knight, the members must exist to uphold the Catholic faith and to preside over its best financial interests. For the sacred memory of the Prince-Archbishop, I cannot possibly allow you to bring Jewish blood into a most pure Catholic Order, the code does not allow-“
Before he had realized what he was doing, Ludwig had already cried, “To Hell with the code!” and had seized the surprisingly heavy book, poised to throw it against the wall. Fortunately for him, he had the sense to catch himself despite the splitting headache and did not throw the heavy work; if he had, the old historian truly never would have forgiven him. Releasing his anger in a boiling outward breath, Ludwig hissed, “I have no more patience for the forgotten codes and regulations written hundreds of years ago by withered and racist old men; for today, there arises a need to reestablish a system of awarding merit to those that deserve it most. Grunsfeld is the first Jewish attorney in Bavaria, and a damn effective one at that; he has prosecuted most of our districts clean from corruption and filth. He is an exceptional individual.”
Silently and with disdain, the unmoving eyes of the ragged ancient did not blink at the King’s bold disregard for the charity of history. He understood that to resist was pointless, yet bitterly did he hold his proud silence. Ludwig continued, his chest swelling with determination, “There will be new books written, and new societies will rise from the ashes of the old. I will renew the ancient Order of Knights into a more inclusive and kind Order, and it will be deemed the Order of Merit.” With a firmness that surprised even himself, Ludwig exclaimed, “It will recognize all who do praiseworthy deeds in the name of King and country, regardless of their faith or social status. May 1837 be the blessed year of a new beginning. Grand Cross and Knight must now make way for the Commander. Good day, Günter.”
With this, he swiftly turned and began the long walk back to his Royal Quarters, leaving the old librarian alone in the chamber where dust hung in the air like smoke. Not a doubt remained in the heart of the King, for he understood that a promise made to a friend over a round of beers is a promise that must be kept regardless of who stands in the way. He knew what he needed to do. He was going to make a new Taler, and it was going to be beautiful… as always.
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The Royal Bavarian Order of St. Michael was originally instituted in 1693 by Josef Clement the Elector as an award for Catholics. As many religious Orders it was falling in disuse during the Secularization of Germany in the beginning of 19th Century. King Ludwig revived the Order as Order of Merit on February 16th, 1837. Now all people could be recognized regardless of faith and stand.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
Taler 1837, ORDER OF MERIT.
Davenport 580, KM 790, Thun 72, AKS 139, J.54
Commemoration of the St. Michael Order being designated as Order of Merit.
Obverse: Head fo Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN. ZEHN EINE FEINE MARK
Reverse: DER ST. MICHAELS-ORDEN ZUM VERDIENST-ORDEN BESTIMMT, 1837 below. Angel on Cross.
28.0600 g., 0.83300 Silver, 0.7515 oz. ASW.
PCGS MS 64.
Gorgeous golden toning, more prominent on edges, clear mirror fields, spectacular appearance coin!
View Coin Davenport 581 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver 2T 1837 BAVARIA - MONETARY UNION 581 NGC MS 61 The morning came, and with it a message to the King that the Director of the Muenzkabinet urgently needed to see him. Upon entering the hall, King Ludwig I of Bavaria instantly recognized the great worry chiseled into Franz Streber’s aged face. With an unassuming curiosity, the King asked, “My dear Franz, what troubles you? Could it be that you desperately desire to tell me that you have created another magnificent Taler glorifying the might of our Bavaria?” The director was not amused - “No, Your Highness; this time, there is a much more serious matter.” Extending his hand, Streber revealed a velvet pouch he had been holding and now emptied all of its contents onto the table between them. A cascade of silver coins rang upon the hard surface and filled the air with the delightful noise of money in motion. “And what’s the meaning of this,” asked Ludwig as he picked up a few of the coins and began to eye them closely, “They seem to be Guilders from the neighboring kingdoms… I recognize Baden, Wurttemberg, even Frankfurt - what seems to be out of the ordinary here?” Suddenly Director Streber cried, “It’s all a mess! We have performed an analysis of the silver content and have come to understand that the amount of silver in these coins is CONSIDERABLY lower than in our Bavarian Guilders! This is unacceptable! Our poor silver miners work tirelessly in the dark through day and night so we can mint our Guilders while our 'benevolent neighbors’ cut corners and churn out rubbish coins without shame, and then they pay their debts to us with their disgraceful pieces! The threat here is dual - we are losing our own silver, and at the same time are selling our wares for a miserably tiny amount.” With this, the Director buried his face in his hands and filled the room with a tense silence.

The King slowly paced the room for a short while, then solemnly began to address the Director, “Yes, the situation seems grave indeed. We cannot ruin relations with our neighbors but we equally cannot let ourselves be ruined. We all know that the Guilder is the primary coin in our Southern States and its silver content should stay approximately… what is the proper percentage again?” Streber chimed in, “Silver content should be 90% of face value.” He did not know where Ludwig was going with his train of thought, and he exclaimed, “But Your Majesty, other provincial governments have different laws on this matter and they can mint any percentage of silver into their coins… we cannot force them anyhow!” Confidently looking at his friend, Ludwig replied,”Do you remember that my father began the process of unifying our lands into taxable economic precincts? In 1818, the Zollverein helped eliminate Customs Barriers. Also there was the Stuttgart Agreement in 1825 with Wurttemberg, when we created the Southern Customs Union. Then there was also the German Customs Union of 1833 that unified us with Prussia. All of these are stages on our great journey of creating a singular economic zone with one currency!” Not yet satisfied, the Director replied, “You are correct, Your Highness, but this Union serves to aid in administration of customs tariffs yet has nothing to do with the silver content of the coins themselves.” Then, with a sigh of resoluteness, the King decreed, “Then it is the time to introduce a new chapter to this story. We are to organize a convention here in Munich with representatives from all of the Southern States, with Baden, Wurttemberg, Hesse-Darmstadt, Nassau, even Frankfurt. All efforts to counterfeit the Guilder will be hereby shut down, and our currency will once again be the world’s example of purity and consistency. From here on out, the Guilder will have a 90% silver composition - no more and no less! This will be the standard across the entire nation! This convention surely is just cause for the minting of a new medallion, a grandiose Taler to celebrate this necessary change!” Triumphantly, the King removed himself from the hall, knowing the way to a brighter future for his country.

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And so be it! The Convention was assembled and known as a “Munich Coin Treaty”. All Landowners of the Southern German States such as Bavaria, Baden, Wurttemberg, Nassau, Hesse- Darmstadt and Frankfurt were in agreement of unification of the currency and the silver content of the coins. Nobody will be able to profit from melting down other states silver coins to make their own. The solid Unit of the Southern German Coinage was the Gulden of 60 Kreutzer or 1/24.5 part of the Cologne Mark. It could be exchanged with Prussia Thaler at the rate of 1 3/4 Gulden to the Thaler. Coins were minted in denominations of Half Gulden, One Gulden, One Thaler and Two Thalers (3 1/2 Gulden) . This denominations were handy up until 1857 when All Mighty Vereinsthaler was introduced and swept off Southern Thaler dominance. But this is another story to come..
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1837, MONETARY UNION.
Davenport 581, KM 792, Thun 75, AKS 98, J.66, Schw. 22.
To Commemorate Monetary Union of the Southern States.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: MUNZVEREINIGUNG SUDTEUTSCHHER STAATEN, standing female with surrounding six shields, 1837 below.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
Attractive dark patina, uncirculated and high quality coin. Some minor bagmarks. Mirror fields.
View Coin Davenport 582 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver 2T 1838 BAVARIA - REAPPORTIONMENT 582 NGC MS 61 Within a chamber of the Royal Library stood King Ludwig I with his highly esteemed historian and cartographer at a wooden table upon which sat an enormous map of the Kingdom of Bavaria, with its many roads and rivers among countless other markings and symbols. Sighing, Ludwig said, “Dearest Günter, truly we must extend our sincerest gratitude to my father Maximilian, for his having organized this geographical nightmare that he had inherited from the French!” The historian let out a sigh of agreement, exclaiming, “Yes, truly, the French idea of dividing the entire realm into the government districts known as Kreis has always caused frustration within the German populace. And such an excessive number of districts, too - fifteen Kreis causes far too much bureaucracy, leading to a sickening number of useless officials. And then there is the issue with naming all of them! From one point of view, it makes sense to name the districts after their nearby rivers, but it does not do justice to them culturally and historically…”

“Thank God,” said Ludwig, “That there are only eight Kreis today. In fact, Günter, could you remind me of the layout of our Bavarian districts?” Picking up a pointer and gesturing to the map, Günter replied, “My pleasure, Your Majesty! As of today we have eight districts. On the southern end we have the Isarkreis named after the Isar River” - the King flinched upon hearing the name - “and in the northern sector we have the Main District or the Mainkreis upon the Main River. The Regenkreis is in the northwest by the Regen River and the Rezatkreis to the West-“ to which the King interrupted, “Let me guess, from the Rezat River...” The historian chuckled to himself and continued, “Of course, Your Majesty! The Danube River has two districts to its name, the Underdonaukreis for the river's lower branch and the upper branch with its Oberdonaukreis. The Lower Main River area Undermainkreis lies on the northeastern border and to the southwest there is the Rhinekreis territory along the Rhine River.” As he said this, the historian pointed out a patch of Rhinekreis territory to the southern end of the map.

With a wave of sadness, the King exclaimed, “Ah, the Rhinekreis - this is what the French called our beautiful Pfalz! The name has nothing to do with the area’s wonderful historical roots. This area belonged to the German Palatinate spread on both sides of the Rhine River, and people lived there together united under One God and One Ruler!” Ludwig closed his eyes with a dreamlike leap through his memories, seeing vivid images of the Palatinate Forest Pfalzerwald with its fragrant pine trees and golden honey and endless rolling fields of wildflowers. All of a sudden he felt gripped by a brilliant idea! “Dear Günter!” He exclaimed with kingly eyes shining. “You are one of the few who remembers the regions’ beautiful Germanic names of old. Perhaps it is time to reinstate the regional names that have been lost to history! Perhaps it is time to rid ourselves of the shameful reminders of French occupation! Let us begin with altering the Rhinekreis back to the good old German Palatinate!” The historian shared his enthusiasm, saying, “An excellent idea! Then the Regenkreis will become the Upper Palatinate, as it was in the good old days!” The King began, “And the Upper Danube Area…” - “Will be Swabia of course!” - “Yes, dear friend, Swabia!” 

He began to nervously pace the room in his anxious thrill. “We need to make sure to reinstate the former names of Bavaria and Franconia.” Together with the historian he leaned over the map and eyed the district boundaries thoughtfully. “Upper Bavaria will be Isarkreis and the Unterdonaukreis will be Lower Bavaria. And Mainkreis… That shall be Upper Franconia! Time to forget this French nonsense once and for all - then Rezatkreis could be Middle Franconia and Untermainkreis can be proudly referred to by its historical name - Lower Franconia! And most importantly…” saying this, Ludwig straightened himself to his fullest height, “I can finally justify my full Royal Title as Ludwig, King of Bavaria, Duke of Franconia, Duke of Swabia and Count Palatine of the Rhine! AND - we can celebrate this momentous occasion with a brand new Taler so our people can remember this forever!” Together they remained at the map for a long while, discussing details of this grand project and drawing new district boundaries, smiling and laughing like children that have found a long lost favorite toy they both greatly enjoyed at one time.
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Thus in the year 1838 King Ludwig issued the order returning the historical names to their proper districts. This change was owed purely to his romantic nature and tendency for reform, as well as from his tremendous love for his homeland of Germany. However, certain areas were not acquired correctly according to their historical roots. For example, the New Palatinate was related mostly to the Western part of the historical Electorate of the Palatinate. Even Ludwig’s future plan to unify the land and eventually acquire the Eastern regions failed because that land was already given to Baden. Eventually, following the Austro-Prussian War in 1866 some other parts of the Bavarian Land (such as Lower Franconia) were lost to Prussia and its Allies. But this is a matter for another story, and for the meantime we will celebrate the REAPPORTIONMENT OF THE BAVARIAN LAND with King Ludwig! 
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1838, REAPPORTIONMENT.
Davenport 582, KM 795, Thun 76, AKS 99, J.67, Schw. 23.
To Commemorate Restoration of the Historical Divisions of the Kingdom.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: DIE EINTHEILUNG D. KONIGREICHS AUF GESCHICHTL GRUNDLAGE ZURUCKGEFURHT 1838,
eight wreaths by circle with the historical names of the districts of the kingdom.
Edge: ** VII E.F.M. ** DREY-EINHALB GULDEN.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
NGC MS 61.
Heavy patchy patina, Mirror fields. Some hairlines from light cleaning.
View Coin Davenport 583 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver 2T 1839 BAVARIA - MAXIMILIAN I 583 PCGS MS 64
In the early hours of the morning, King Ludwig II was notified that the Maestro Bertel Thorvaldsen had arrived, as he had just returned from Rome at his Highness’s invitation. Descending the winding stone staircase into the Grand Hall of the palace, the King at once noticed the familiar figure of the world-renowned sculptor. “Dearest of friends!” - Ludwig embraced tightly the stately and handsome gentleman with the dignified halo of thin grey hair. “How it pleases me, that a master such as yourself could find the time to grace our Munich with your presence! Surely I understand how demanding the curriculum at the Roman School of Sculpture can be - you busy fellow! Let us go, breakfast should already be served!”

In the hours following a sumptuous breakfast the two found themselves strolling through the sunny day in the Royal Park. “My dear Bertel!” began Ludwig, “Our beautiful Bavaria will always be in the debt of your talents - I refer, of course, to the magnificent statue of Adonis you made, which forever remains one of the dearest gem treasures our glorious country has to offer. It has always fascinated me endlessly to see how you are able to reveal the purest beauty out of the dullest of marble blocks - and only with a meager hammer and chisel! It is as you have once said to me: ‘To take a mass of marble and remove all of the excess!’” With a small laugh, the sculptor smiled and bowed graciously to his royal host, thinking to himself, “Ludwig must be leading up to something. Firstly, it was not I that said those words, but the Great Michelangelo himself, and second, since the King himself invited me here, then surely he must be preparing an offer of some kind. Whatever he has in mind must be an interesting project, more so the payout would surely be grand!”

The aged and experienced sculptor loved the wholesome Bavarian guldens and King Ludwig never spared any expense when it came to fine art for his beloved Germany. The maestro had already begun tallying in his head the cumulative expenses of a renovation of his School of Sculpture in Rome, and how he may be able to exact a sum from the Papal Financial Reserve - in all, there should be enough for a whole new building, and more workshops, and furnaces!" As the daydreams whirled in Bertel’s head, he had not noticed that Ludwig had long begun on the subject already, holding him under the arm, saying, “…and then Maximilian stood in his stirrups and waved his kingly hand as legions of knights led by the fearless Johan Tserclaes, Count of Tilly, broke through and encircled the army of Frederick, King of Bohemia, Count Palatine of the Rhine at the historical Battle of White Mountain… that laughable Winter King, they called him! And he brought peace and calm upon the entire Rhenish Palatinate under the divine right of Maximilian and the entire Holy Roman Catholic Church…”

“…forgive me, Your Highness, do you speak of your father Maximilian? Or, do I misunderstand…” timidly interrupted the elderly artisan. Ludwig furrowed his eyebrows and replied cheerfully, “Of course not, my friend! I refer of course to our glorious ancestor Maximilian the Elector of Bavaria, Duke and Warrior, whose wisdom and heroism helped to unite our Bavarian lands in the old days of the Thirty Years War! How could it be that in my beloved Munich there yet stands no monument to such a hero of Germany? I am beyond ready to pay an immense weight in gold for the bronze you will need to immortalize our national hero, my beloved ancestor!”

“An excellent proposal, Your Highness!” said the maestro, again bowing his head reverently, “and how would you prefer to see your ancestor immortalized - standing or sitting? With a sword? For everybody knows that Your Highness is himself a sculptor at heart who brims with brilliant ideas!” Ludwig smiled and began, “Thank you Bertel, but for this occasion I have invited you, so that specifically YOU could bestow upon me the idea for such an important monument..” The sculptor paused for a second, thinking to himself, “Ai ai ai, I barely know anything about this Maximilian of old, unless.. wait wait! How the King just mentioned… standing in his stirrups he waved his hand — EUREKA!” He then addressed the King, saying, “Your Highness! A shining idea has occurred to me! We will portray Maximilian upon his war horse in the heat of battle, with an outstretched arm, like the great Falconet portrayed Peter the Great of Russia, almost as a Roman Emperor watching over his army - and in neoclassical style as well!”

“A most fantastic idea, dearest friend,” cried Ludwig with jubilant excitement, “for I knew that you of all people could help me bring this project into the world. Do not lose any time, dearest friend, and show me the rough drawings tonight! And do not worry about the cost - for you know, I do not stay in debt for long, ha ha…”

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Thus was imagined and then fired in bronze and marble the statue of Maximilian the Elector, which to this day graces the Wittelsbacherplatz in Munich. The pedestal is made of marble, the horse and rider are made of cast bronze. The statue was erected in 1839. Maximilian is hailed with the creation of the Catholic League in 1609 to counteract the Protestant Union during the Thirty Years War. In 1623, Maximilian conquered the Palatinate and by the authority of the Holy Roman Emperor he became the Elector of the Upper Palatinate, a title he retained up to the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 - which happened to bring to an end the longest war Europe had ever seen up to that point.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1839, MAXIMILIAN I ELECTOR.
Davenport 583, KM 804 (425), Thun 77, AKS 100, J.68, Schw. 24.
To Commemorate Maximilian I, first Elector of the Bavaria.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse:REITERSAULE MAXIMILIAN'S I CHURFURSTEN V. BAYERN, equestrian statue of the Max, ERRICHTET V. KONIG LUDWIG I 1839 below. (Equestrian column of Maximilian I, Elector of Bavaria, erected by King Ludwig I).
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
PCGS MS 64.
Attractive toning with golden irridescence on reverse, clear fields.
View Coin Davenport 584 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. King Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver 2T 1840 BAVARIA 584 NGC MS 63 “Auf Wiedersehen Meine Kleine, Auf Wiedersehen…” - King Ludwig sang the words of a renowned folk song. “Farewell, farewell to my dear Konventionstaler! Things were so good when we were together! But this is now in the past and a new page has hidden the old word-filled page underneath…It is even rather sad, my dear Carl.” The King and the Head Engraver stood in the center of the Muenzekabinet and together were examining a fresh new taler still hot from underneath the press. “What to do, dear Master, we need to fill out an international agreement. Since it has been decided to change to a new value system, this is what needs to be done.” The King once more keenly eyed the taler and even flipped it into the air, delighting in the shiny contours of the fresh coin. “This is what happens when you unify the good old Guilder with the now friendly Taler - you get the Vereinsmuenze, or the Union Coin!” The old Engraver Carl Voigt nodded in approval. “Direct your attention, Your Highness, the new coin is larger in size. Normally it is equivalent to 3.5 Guilders or 2 Talers in value.” Ludwig agreed, “I see, dear Carl - i’ll tell you more, I even like it! I love big, weighty coins… it is so pleasant to hold them in the hand, especially when there are many of them!” The King had himself a laugh, pleased with his joke. “Even my portrait is looking a little different.. you didn’t happen to change my hairstyle, my dear Carl?” “Of course not, Your Highness, your hairstyle has remained as it was before, as we all appreciate it to be. Your kingly profile, the most popular in our Bavaria. Ask any barber!” Joked the Engraver in response, “And as concerns the new Talers, today we begin the mintage of coins with a new profile. Little by little they will entirely replace our good old Konventifonstalers,” said the Master as he inclined his head.” Ludwig replied, “But don’t forget our legacy. We still have to continue the mintage of our Commemorative Historical Coin to inscribe our proud German heritage, our Glory!” The Master, smiling, responded, “Don’t worry, Your Highness, the difference will only be in that now every commemorative coin will be valued at two talers instead of one as before.” The King once more weighed the coin in his hand. “It’s bigger and heavier… how much silver is within it?” The Mintmaster replied, “37 grams in comparison with the old 28 gram.” The King said, “This means that we’ll need more silver and maybe we’ll even have to reduce the mintage.” The mintmaster reassured him, “Do not worry, Your Highness, we’ll count everything out. Your treasury, and especially your legacy won’t suffer any shame” “Wonderful! I already have several new ideas that I’ll need to form into silver, into new Taler Commemorative Coins!”

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And thus since the year 1839 Bavaria began to issue coins with a new face - the so-called Vereinsmuenze or Union Thalers following the Munich Coin Treaty of 1837 and the consequent Dresden Coinage Convention of 1838. That was an attempt to unite the Prussian Taler and the Southern Guilder by a fixed exchange rate across multiple lands. The Thaler now became equal to 1.75 Guldens and the Gulden became equal to 4/7 of the Thaler with standard silver content which was 90% of the coin’s face value. The battle between the Prussian Thaler and the Southern Guilder was almost over towards the Thaler and the Prussian economic and political dominance over the German Land. The Vienna Coinage Treaty of 1857 was the last nail in a coffin of the Southern Currency System but this will be another story to tell.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1840.
Davenport 584, KM 805 (426), Thun 73, AKS 73, J.64, Schw. 19.
Vereinsmünze - Regular Issue. Doppeltaler.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: VERTEINSMUNZE above oak wreath VII EINE F. MARK 3 1/2 GULDEN 2 THALER 1840 inside the wreath. VII EINE F. MARK below.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
NGC MS 63. (# 3498789-001).
Slightly toned, satin luster, flawless fields.
View Coin Davenport 585 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver 2T 1840 BAVARIA - ALBRECHT DURER 585 NGC MS 63 Ludwig anxiously awaited news from Nuremberg. He could not believe the mere possibility that soon enough, his own two hands would be holding one of Germany’s most precious treasures - the thought alone would not let the King even a moment of sleep for several days! Handling such growing apprehension did not come easily to Ludwig, as he paced back and forth throughout the richly decorated hallways of the palace, mistrustfully eyeing the ancestral portraits leering at him from the walls. Stopping at one wall, he abruptly would move to another: he simply could not find the right spot for the next painting. “Too narrow here… too dark there! This will not do, the centerpiece of the whole damn collection cannot hang there! A portrait from the Master himself! And autographed from the first brushstroke to the bloody last!” How many countless times already has he thanked the skies for the greed of the many-chinned from the Nuremberg Magistrate and the geniality of his own great-grandfather Maximilian, who together with his help, of course, agreed to this clever combination - the result of which turned his own precious Munich into the ‘Capital of Elegant Artwork’, into a museum-city, and he, Ludwig, remains as a worthy successor and continuator of the tradition of the Great Maximilian, the Elector of Bavaria. It was truly a brilliant idea: replacing (hidden from public notice) the true artists’ canvases with artificially reproduced copies, and even leaving them in their original frames… It was not difficult to find artists to complete such a job, for it was much harder to garner the support of the mayor and the artistic collective of trustees - but knowing the exorbitant appetite of the heads of urban administration and their love for true Bavarian Talers - this proved quite the feasible task. In 1627 the Council already sold to Granpa Max the two great panels of the “Four Preachers” - the Master’s last gift to his hometown. Ludwig also would not let himself be bought, especially when the conversation turns to the greatest artist of all time and all cultures! Albrecht Durer…The greatest Master of engraving and xylography, the Northern Renaissance’s True Father and shameless Theoretic. His mysterious and majestic canvases, that decorated palaces and cathedrals all across Europa or the exquisite bas-reliefs and engravings which to this day shatter minds and of themselves write entire tomes of philosophy and palmism - everything the Great Master touched turned instantly to masterpiece status; and kept under crushing safeguard in Museums and palace collections, Everywhere ….. but not in his own Nuremberg! How many decades has the Grand Master been in business with his drawings and blanks, not referring of course to the completed fabrics that were sold ineptly and wastefully, replaced, cut out of the frames by city officials, ready to burn the world if only for money alone, even to go as far as to destroy the sacred artworks of the Genius Master himself! Ludwig went to Nuremberg and beheld the horrid, absurd copies from local artists, many of which remained in their original frames, the frames that felt the hand of the Original Master’s touch. Even thinking about this travesty would cause the King heartache. He thought of the swindled masses, looking into the holy faces on massive palace-tier bas-reliefs and engravings, not realizing that they pray to cheap and profane reproductions, the originals of which already long ago hang in the palace of and delight the eyes of himself, The King of Bavaria, Ludwig I.

The courier arrived from Nuremberg already well past midnight. Not glancing at lateness of time, Ludwig ordered the portrait delivery into the throne room, impatiently waiting while the servants carefully brought it in and set the cloth down on a specially prepared stand. Palace artists and restorators stood alongside the King; their task consisted of meticulously and extremely carefully replacing all damaged details within the artwork, and to prepare it for the King’s personal collection. Finally with everything readied, the crew removed the gray fabric that choked the portrait and then, Master Durer’s stern eyes met with the eyes of the King of Bavaria, Ludwig. Silently they observed one another, the Virtuoso Artist and the Bavarian King, separated by vast stretches of time, and Ludwig for the first time felt that under such a prodigious gaze, his thoughts, those that had long tortured him and not let him sleep, suddenly became clear and rational and the Kingly soul became immediately light, strangely carrying a slight aroma of fresh lemongrass. He knew then what he must do.
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Albrecht Durer’s self-portrait was given as a gift to the Town Council by Durer himself, and, like many other works from the hands of the Master, were collected by the King of Bavaria. The tragedy was that the original painting was given secretly to some local painter to make a copy. That painter ingeniously SAWED the panel in half and attached his copy on to the back, on which were the Town Seal and other ownership markings. The original went to King Ludwig, and the poor citizens and the Magistrate were looking at the fraudulent copy until our present days as a monument to dishonor and greed. Several times, King Ludwig returned several original banners to his hometown, for instance, “Descent from the Cross”, known as the Peller Altar-piece, as well as “Hercules and the Stymphalian Birds” from Schleissheim… and thus, to carve the name of the great Son of Germany into the Ages, erected a monument to the Great Master in his native city. And of course, the memorial 2 Taler coin - how could we even dare to forget….
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1840, Albrecht Durer.
Davenport 585, KM 806 (427), Thun 78, AKS 101, J.69, Schw. 25.
To Commemorate erection of statue to Albrecht Durer in Nuremberg in 1840.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: STANDBILD A. DURER'S ERRICHTET ZU NURNBERG, 1840, Statue of Dürer.
Edge: ** VII E.F.M. ** DREY-EINHALB GULDEN.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
NGC MS 63.
Spectacular smoky rainbow patina, uncirculated and flawless fields.
View Coin Davenport 586 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver 2T 1841 BAVARIA - J.P.F. RICHTER 586 PCGS MS 63 Teresa gracefully reclined on an ornate bench in the garden, taking in the crisp morning aroma hanging in the cool air wafting from the flowers. She was taking a break from the children, the royal husband, and everything having to do with the duties of the house and kingdom. This was her alone time - nobody could disturb her reposing in solitude. And there was a book, of course! In the hands of the queen rested a new tome of Jean Paul - a controversial artist of immense creativity which even after his death conjured an extraordinary reaction from the highest circles of Bavarian aristocracy. Some considered him a genius of the style of Romanticism, some considered him an utter failure; he could skillfully speculate on the readers’ love of emotional dramas, but one thing remained clear - Jean Paul was one of the literary pillars of Germany, and the queen adored his playful style and his engrossing plot twists. Her favorite work, of course, was “Titan,” which still aroused arguments in the German aristocracy. But today in the hands of the queen was one of the last classical works, “Levana or The Doctrine of Education,” written in Paul’s old age and containing the wisdom of a man unafraid to transmit it to another. The queen tried to find answers to questions that would cause her to awaken in the middle of the night and rob her of sleep and torture her until dawn: what will be the fate of her children, how to best maintain relations with her husband, how to be an exemplary woman, but most of all the futures of her children troubled her - how to raise and prepare them for the challenges that lie ahead of them. Within this emotional turmoil she was found by Ludwig - “What are we reading?” The King sat next to his wife and held her in a tight embrace. “Well of course, again Jean Paul!” Exclaimed Teresa. Ludwig’s face wrinkled as he thought to himself, surely there’s something more interesting than the empty musings of a man who even writes his own name in the French style… And this is even after the defeat of Napoleon! "Where is your patriotism, dear? Why not read something out of German classical literature, Goethe, or Schiller, for instance?” - and the King playfully hugged her again. “If Your Highness understood anything about literature,” retorted the queen, “then you would know that there exists nothing French in the writings of John Richter, barring the pseudonym. And even the pseudonym holds nothing in common with Napoleon, only to associate him with the great Russo. And nobody but Richter understood the depths of the woman’s soul, of my soul!” Within the eyes of the queen, tears welled. “Men are rude and uncouth, filled with vices and love for power and money - and we, the women, are called to carry the love, beauty, and wisdom of life. And then to transmit them to my children, who are in fact also your own children, my King! Your style of upbringing so far only consists of patting them on the head if they happen to be running by, entirely not enough to raise the next generation of the royal family,” and Teresa once again exhaled returning to her heavy thoughts from before. “And if you, Your Highness, would read Richter, you would understand how difficult it is to be a woman, and especially a queen raising her children while her own husband is busy collecting portraits of shameless courtesans! ” The King frowned, “Well, darling, please forgive your stupid and uneducated husband,” as he hugged Teresa tighter. “If you like Richter this much, then today I will assign the best sculptors in the kingdom to design a grand monument for your favorite author to be placed somewhere in his fatherland. I also promise to place his portrait in our Gallery of German Heroes so that future generations could be enlightened by the favorite author of my beautiful wife!” Ludwig completely fluttered seeing how Teresa melted at his side, feeling her aromatic perfume on his shoulder. “I will even do more - I will order a new Taler to be made glorifying a truly worthy author. Am I not a King?!” And with this Ludwig ended his tirade with a lengthy kiss, and with a single swoop melting the heart of his beloved wife.
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The monument to John Richter was finished and opened to the public in the year 1841 in his favorite city, Bayreuth, where the great novelist lived with his wife Carolina in their finest and most creative years. The famous sculptor Ludwig von Schwanthaler fashioned the monument out of bronze which was open on the 16th anniversary of the death of Jean Paul. The great Romantic was portrayed staring sadly into the distance with a feather in one hand and a book in the other. Born into a family in poverty, Richter continued his thorny path to the heights of the literary Olympus, but as if with all his image upheld one of his most famous aphorisms: “We wish for immortality not as the reward, but as the perpetuity of virtue.”
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1841, J.P.F. RICHTER.
Davenport 586, KM 810, Thun 79, AKS 102, J.70, Schw. 26.
To Commemorate erection of statue to Richter in Bayreuth in 1841.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: STANDBILD JEAN PAUL FRIEDRICH RICHTER'S ERRICHTET ZU BAYREUTH 1841, Statue of Richter.
Edge: ** VII E.F.M. ** DREY-EINHALB GULDEN.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
PCGS MS 63.
Cameo strike, clear mirror fields with minimal hairlines, touch of golden toning on reverse.
View Coin Davenport 587 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. King Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver 2T 1842 BAVARIA - WALHALLA 587 NGC MS 62 “… Something heavy pounded the chest - Thorwald felt for a split second the feeling of flying, but the impact of the ground he did not feel. Everything surrounding him suddenly became covered with a misty haze, as the clang of metal, shouting, and battlefield noise strangely disappeared and instead hung an eerie silence. For a few moments, the warrior waited to see what would happen next - when at once he felt a light touch on his face. His eyes opened slowly but his surroundings still lay wrapped in dark, yet he could see a faint glow emanating from somewhere afar off. The light laughter of women appeared above his head. The warrior could see through the heavy fog that two young women were eyeing him closely and speaking between themselves. “He’s a pretty one!… Let’s take him… I like him too!…” Thorwald wanted to say something in return, to answer, but he could not move a muscle as suddenly a bitter cold filled his entire body. Then, one of the beauties leaned over him, her full eyes flashing like diamonds when suddenly the warrior beheld, that upon the woman’s head rested a metallic helm and from behind her shoulder stretched a lengthy blued wing…”

Slamming the book shut, Ludwig relaxed in his chair and dreamily closed his eyes. “Valkyries, demons of Asgard, obedient slaves of Odin”.. How many times did he, when he was still a young Crown Prince, dream about being lifted on high by mystical horsemen, far above the ground, higher and higher beyond the reaches of the clouds, straight to the shimmering golden palaces of Valhalla where he, the King and Conqueror, would live out eternal life with feasts and luxury - glorious conversations with the Gods and heroes of former battles and wars! The only thing that harmed and hindered the Crown Prince’s dream was the precondition that attaining the lofty heights of Odin’s Valhalla only occurred in one way only - to become a hero and to lay down his life on the field of battle. Ludwig never had any troubles being a hero of the realm - it was the death part that seemed much more unpleasant. He hated the idea of dying in a fatal struggle with a superior foe. But even after a heroic death, not all warriors entered Valhalla! As the legend goes, the Goddess Freya would take half of the fallen heroes for herself to that garden of love eternal, Folkvangr. Oh,no! Ludwig could not wait. He needed Valhalla here on Earth, and he needed it now - not later and then maybe.

He rushed to find his father. “A wonderful idea!” - exclaimed papa Maximilian, who evidently was in a good mood, so the idea of constructing a palace to honor the fallen heroes of Germanic lands fell favorably upon him. In addition, it would serve them well to remind Napoleon that Germany had not yet fallen under his foot, that patriots did indeed remain in the land.”Tomorrow we will gather all of the famous sculptors and order busts of Germany’s greatest sons - my historian Johann von Muller will help in the selection of the heroes and in time, the palace will stand!” Inside the head of Ludwig, the project was already completed - of course it will be in Greek style with large columns and stairways, with an enormous hall within, having walls upon walls of portraits of philosophers, heroes, wise men, poets, and himself - Ludwig, King of Bavaria would stand in the center of them all, as an equal among equals!
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Ludwig’s dream came true - his majestic monument welcomes everybody who climbs the snow-white staircase under the temple arches, passing through the colonnade and getting to the hall where the heroes of the German lands beginning with Arminius defeated the Romans in the Teutoburg Forest of the 9th century, and ending with Heine and Stein - they remind all of the priceless deposit made by the German peoples into the vault of world history for the good of all humanity. The edifice made in Neo-classical style was constructed in the period from the year 1826 to 1842, made in resemblance to the Greek Parthenon - the favorite style of the King of Bavaria. 96 busts and 64 plaques were made available for its unveiling and opening, providing elaborate descriptions of persons and events. Despite the fact that many Germanic heroes lived in different parts of the world, they were all united by one common element - love of Germany and honor towards their German-speaking ancestors. And of course, the memorial Taler with the image of Valhalla - the Valhalla of King Ludwig!
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1842, WALHALLA.
Davenport 587, KM 811, Thun 80, AKS 103, J.71, Schw. 27.
To Commemorate erection of Palace of Valhalla.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: WALHALLA, Parthenon-like building on terraces, 1842 below.
Edge: ** VII E.F.M. ** DREY-EINHALB GULDEN.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
NGC MS 62.
Attractive champagne toning, spectacular luster, tiny scratch onder the head of Ludwig - otherwise completely flawless gem.
View Coin Davenport 588 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver 2T 1842 BAVARIA - ROYAL WEDDING "12 OCTB. 1842" 588 NGC MS 63 “…A Prussian princess?!” - Ludwig furrowed his brows - “But she is a Protestant!” “And so what?” - said Maximilian, looking straight at his father’s eyes, “Mother is also a Protestant, so no problem! And moreover, our Bavaria long has become a country of diverse faiths! In any case, I would take care of this once I become King! It is time to throw off these chains of medieval Catholicism; we live in the Nineteenth Century! I am entirely indifferent as to what language people use to read the Bible in German churches.” Ludwig looked pointedly at his son. How he has grown - a smart, well-educated, and mature man. And now the matter of the wedding with Princess Maria… It is time for it. The future king is already thirty years old, it is time to think about starting a family and furthering the bloodline. Ludwig remembered the Prussian Princess Maria very well - she was lovely, young, always laughing one, and often visited the palace of his uncle, the King of Prussia, Friedrich Wilhelm. Ludwig heard that the princess, being the daughter of Prince Wilhelm, grew up in the Sudetski Mountains in the expanses of Silesia, and despite her petite appearance she was an avid mountain climber and loved to spend time hiking along steep mountain trails. It was there that she first met the young Bavarian Crown Prince - Maximilian at that time was traveling across Bohemia in search of adventures. Full of life and energy, Maria was the complete opposite of the cold and snobby Maximilian, who was also much older than she was and who considered that the time spent reading a book was just as effective (if not more) as climbing a mountain was. However, soon after he caught the energy of his companion, and took to enjoying adventuring across mountainsides holding a mountaineer’s pickaxe, taking in the fresh aromas of flowers and admiring the sunsets. The princess was immediately fascinated by the mind and erudition of the young Prince and nobody was surprised when after a while some real feelings flared up between them. These emotions were so strong that Maria even broke off her engagement with the Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, her fiancee with whom she was (at the time) foreseeing a long life together. And now, the question arose about the wedding. “Probably it will be better this way,” thought Ludwig. Maximilian is already thirty, the prime age to be thinking about furthering the Wittelsbach line. “It’s decided!” - Ludwig embraced his son - “we will appoint a wedding in the good old tradition for October! Today I will order Joseph Karl Stieler to fashion a portrait of the Princess for our Gallery of Beauty, we will prepare the celebrations - I want for the entirety of Munich to be filled to the brim with beer! And of course, we will have a memorial Taler for the occasion - today we will make a sketch. I will call it “The Wedding Taler”! I want this wedding to be remembered by Bavarians as the symbol of the unification between Bavaria and Prussia, the one and the only Great Germany!!”

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Crown Prince Maximilian married Princess Maria of Prussia on October 12th, 1842. Being an opponent of the unification of Germany under the boot of Friedrich Willhelm, he loved his wife, who in turn loved Bavaria and its people. Released from the Protestant family, Maria was respected by the Catholic Church for her beauty, mind, and modesty. This was noticeable in contrast to her husband - the scientist Maximilian, who was always reserved in reference to the church. The Princess quickly became used to Bavarian tradition, and the Bavarian mountains and mountain trails - it is with her arrival that the sport of mountaineering became associated as a part of life for ordinary Bavarians. In consequence, Maria even changed from the Protestant faith of her ancestors and became a true Catholic. Being a faithful wife to the King of Bavaria, she blessed him with two sons - Ludwig and Otto. Both were later crowned to the throne but their rule was not happy - being weak in health they were found incapable of bearing the burden of the state, and their fates were shattered by treason and betrayal - but this is a completely different story.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1842, ROYAL WEDDING.
Davenport 588, KM 812.1, Thun 81, AKS 104, J.72, Schw. 28.
To Commemorate the Marriage of Crown Prince Maximilian to Marie of Prussia.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: Cojoined heads to the right. MAXIMILIAN KRONPR. V. BAYERN U. MARIE K. PRINZ. V. PREUSS. VERM. D. 12 OCTB. 1842.
Edge: ** VII E.F.M. ** DREY-EINHALB GULDEN.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
NGC MS 63.
Pink champagne toning, mirror fields, cameo strike - one of the best examples of its type.
View Coin Davenport 589 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. King Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver 2T 1843 BAVARIA 589 PCGS MS 63 “Franz, I want this to be a completely new type of Taler - a new design!” said King Ludwig, looking directly at the Mint Director. “This is of utmost importance not only for Bavaria but for the entirety of Germany! I’ve already listened to all of the arguments and commentaries directed at me at that meeting in Dresden, that they call a “Convention”… They - by this I mean the King of Prussia and his vassals - they don’t give a damn about our traditions, our currency. I will not allow for the coinage of my country to depict some kind of trash - whether it be a Prussian eagle or whatnot!” The King jumped up and started to pace the room. “Your Highness!” Franz von Streber the old Mint Director inclined his head in concern - “We have already thought it all out. Our engraver Carl Voight already fashioned a new, unique design for your newest Taler. Considering the new rules agreed upon at the Convention, it will resemble of course a piece in two coins with the inscription ‘2 Taler 3 1/2 Guldens’ so that nobody may forget that this is indeed your idea and your Gulden is in unity with the Prussian Taler. And of course, the most important, our Bavarian emblem, our lions, the symbol of the might of Your Highness!” King Ludwig replied, “To hell with symbols! It’s not about them! I am not, in fact, referring to them -“ as he fell into his chair and covered his face with his hands. “I am talking about my hair style! It is high time we changed it. I’ve grown dreadfully tired of this shovel hair on my coinage. Change something for me, or at least add some curls above the ears.” The Mint Director replied, bowing respectfully, “However is best for Your Highness. Today we will begin designing a new sketch - you are sure to love it!” But in his soul the Mint Director knew that Ludwig would not let under any circumstances any change befall his profile and all of his talk will thus end up useless in the air and not on paper or even worse on the silver of coins.
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Thus thanks to the efforts of Ludwig and his attempts at creating a unified system of currency, beginning from the Munich Agreement in 1837 and continuing in Dresden, July 30th 1838, the Convention took place unifying the currency systems of the north and south of Germany. This was the second grand attempt at creating a unified currency - the first took place at the Grand Coinage Convention in 1738 - but the Dresden Conference was significantly more meaningful in the establishment of a Monetary Union. Many lands and districts finally found agreement upon how to convert the Taler of the north and the Guldens of the south. Into this Union went the powers of Prussia, Bavaria, Wurtemberg, Baden, Hesse, the Saxon lands, Nassau, Schwarzburg, Reuss, and also the free city of Frankfurt-am-Main. The new fixed exchange rate for the Taler was established to be equal to 1.75 Gulden, and for the Gulden it was to be equal to 4/7 of a Taler. Further developments of the Vereinsmuenze would come in the year of 1857 when Austria and the Zollverein (the nations of the Union) would gather at the Convention in Vienna. But this is already another story.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Talers 1843.
Davenport 589, KM 814 (432), Thun 74, AKS 74, J.65, Schw. 20.
Vereinsmünze - Regular Issue. Doppeltaler.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: 3 1/2 GULDEN VII EINE F. MARK 2 THALER, crowned and supported arms, VEREINSMUNZE AND 1843 below.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
PCGS MS 63. (# 82437648).
Satine luster on obverse with spotty toning and some hairlines in fields, brilliant uncirculated on reverse with dark-rainbow tone at the edges.
View Coin Davenport 590 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver 2T 1843 BAVARIA -ERLANGEN ACADEMY 590 NGC MS 63 As the flags fluttered, and the drums rumbled, frightened birds darted in all directions through the warm September sky – the Oktoberfest parade was in full swing! King Ludwig and his wife Theresa sat in an observation lodge festively decorated with flowers, watching as the neat ranks of brave Bavarian soldiers marched in full uniform across the main street in Munich, heading towards the city wall. There, in a big meadow at the foot of the hill , there were already set up many colorful tents, huge barrels of beer, music was playing and Bavarian girls were joyfully dancing the Zweifacher with the boys – all glorifying the marriage of the King and Queen! Fancy costumes, wigs, and camisoles flashed, simple peasant skirts, multicolored ribbons – the fun was in full.
“What a great idea it was to arrange military parades as part of the wedding celebration,” thought Ludwig, “let all the guests and the townspeople see the strength of our army and the Bavarian spirit!”
“Your Majesty!” – the First Minister leaned towards him – “A group of noble townspeople of the city of Erlangen asks you to kindly taste the new Kitzmann beer, specially prepared for our joyous holiday!” – and the Minister nodded towards a group of brightly dressed people led by a gray-haired Beermaster, his young entourage holding forth a newly opened barrel of beer that rested upon a special stretcher.
The King beamed in return, exclaiming, “Of course! Of course, let them come! My throat has been dry for far too long!” With this, a group of brewers timidly approached, as the Monarch was presented with a hefty stein filled to the brim with rich amber liquid. Ludwig took a sip and exhaled with supreme enjoyment. “Sumptuous! The best beer, in all of our Bavaria – UNCONTESTED. How did you say… Kitzmann? This is something truly new, and special – I don’t remember such a brewery in Erlangen…”
At this concluding remark, one of the guests chimed in, saying, “You are right, Your Majesty!” Removing his hat, he bowed low before the King. “Let me introduce myself! Johann Lorenz Kitzmann, at Your service. I am the new owner of the Breweries and I hasten to ensure you that my beer will be even better than that of the old owners, the Vierzigmann Family!” Bowing low once more, he continued: “Our historic Old Town, along with the famous Burgberg caves, are always open for your Majesty – we want your Oktoberfest to be as famous in Germany as our Bergkirchweih!” The group of townsfolk graciously took their leave and merged back into the furor of the day’s festivities.
When the group departed, Ludwig took another sip from the mug. “Beer and military parades are what our Bavarians love most,” he turned then to Theresa – “Dear, do you think it’s time to glorify Bavarian beer and secure a place for it in history… to erect some kind of monument, or, even better… perhaps a memorial Thaler! Glorifying the brewers in general and Erlangen in particular… hmm.. in my opinion, a great idea!” Upon saying this, Ludwig looked longingly at his wife and queen, waiting for what she had to say.
“Of course, Your Majesty,” sneered Theresa in mock skepticism, “let us glorify beer for centuries – and with it, all the drunkenness, fights, and buffoonery that come alongside. You do it well… first you celebrate a Thaler with a barrel of beer – and they’ll immediately start calling it the ‘Beer Taler’ – well, you know our cheery folk better than anyone. No, Your Majesty… history is reserved for the glorification of art and poetry, of education, and not for the stupid compulsion to fill your throat and bray drunkenly at parties. Not to mention that, in the selfsame Erlangen, they don’t JUST have breweries; for example, there is a University – couldn’t you better devote your new coin to the University of Friedrich?” With this, she resumed her former air of royal grace in solemn femininity.
“BAH! This is a Protestant University! I have enough problem with our Holy Roman Catholic Church - why I need another one?” Ludwig snapped back, looking fixedly at his wife. “Not just a Protestant University, but the first-of-its-kind University where they study ancient religious texts in a new and unorthodox way! We must be proud that we have it, of course! I – Your Majesty, if you haven’t forgotten that yet – am also a Protestant, and.. and proud of it,” She added irritably. Upon saying this, Theresa turned away and pursed her lips in annoyed embarrassment.
At a glance, the King continued: “Of course, Dear, I remember more than that – I feel thrilled to have a wife that is also a Protestant and our Bavaria is a country where all faiths live in peace!” He then gently took Theresa by the hand. “We will release a commemorative thaler in honor of the University of Erlangen with… a monument to Friedrich of Brandenburg-Bayreuth. I promise! The only thing is that He will be depicted holding… holding a STEIN of delicious Kitzmann-brau!” He roared with laughter at his own joke, nearly falling backwards over his own chair. Theresa rolled her eyes.
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The University of Erlangen was founded by Margrave Frederick of Brandenburg-Bayreuth in 1742, first in the city of Bayreuth, and then later transferred to city of Erlangen. As the first Protestant university in Germany, it was a center for the study of Protestant theology, as well as of mathematics and medicine. The University was named after Frederick (the founder) and Margrave Christian Frederich Charles Alexander of Brandenburg-Ansbach, who was its main trustee. To this day, the doors of the University of Friedrich-Alexander are open to students from all over the world – open just like the famous Burgberg Caves during Bergkirchweih in the city of Erlangen.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Talers 1843.
Davenport 590, KM 817 (434), Thun 82, AKS 105, J.73, Schw. 29.
Commemorative - for the Centennial of the founding of the University of Erlangen by Margrave Friedrich of Brandenburg-Bayreuth.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: HUNDERTJAHRIGE GRUNDUNG DER HOCHSCHULE ZU ERLANGEN DURCH D. MARKGR. FRIEDR. V. BRANDENB. BAYR., 1843, Statue of Friedrich.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
NGC MS 63.
Smoky-rainbow toning with glassy fields, more prominent at the edges. Uncirculated details of the design. Attractive-looking coin.
View Coin Davenport 591 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. King Ludwig I (1825- 1848) Silver 2T 1844 BAVARIA - GENERAL'S HALL 591 PCGS MS 63 "And now we shall drink for our Republic! Hooray! Let's go, Hans!" - the two good friends again raised their weighty beer mugs and took a huge swig. "Such fine beer! It is a pity that Oktoberfest came to an end, though, Karl," and the one who was named Karl nodded in solemn agreement and again raised his mug of beer to his lips. Hans looked around - the beer hall was packed to its fullest capacity; the sound of voices and accordion, along with the thick cigarette smoke hung in the air, as beautiful girls quickly scurried around, dragging great glass piles of empty and filled beer steins. "Something has become hot here - maybe we can go for a walk," suggested one of the friends, "I know another tavern not far from here, on the Ludwigstrasse!" The friends finished their beers together, banged their mugs on the wooden table and began to make towards the exit with much difficulty. Out on the street, too, it was crowded but the fresh air and the cool October sun sobered the drunks and they began moving each other towards the Ludwigstrasse. After a while, the friends found themselves in front of a strange building resembling a palace with columns but lacking walls. "That's it for you!" Hans hiccupped - "There are no walls, there is not even a place to go to the toilet, except to hide behind this fellow..." - and thus Hans waved his hand towards the side of the great bronze statue nestled under the roof of this strange building. "You what!" - said Karl, pulling at his friend - "It is impossible, you old pig! This is Feldherrnhalle! And this is not any fellow, but our famous commander von Wrede!" - "Well, my apologies, brother, I live in Berlin and I do not know much about your Bavarian commanders!" said Hans, looking around. "And the second one is also a Bavarian commander?" "This is also the famous Johann Tilly - he led us to victory in the Thirty Years War for the Mother Church! And you know," said Karl, leaning in towards his friend, "I will tell you secretly - this Tilly is not even a Bavarian at all, but a Belgian or Dutchman - I don't remember exactly..." Hans laughed, saying, "Come on! Maybe you will say that the second one is not a commander either!" Then Karl responded, "You can laugh, but this is true; the whole of Bavaria knows about it. The second is also not a commander - von Wrede was just an ordinary official, and only under Napoleon, he ascended to commander and appointed himself Colonel! I was always afraid of bullets and shrapnel!" The friends again laughed. "Wait, wait," said Hans, stopping a friend, "and the man in the center with the woman and the banner is also a general? No, wait, I'll guess right now - this is a real Bavarian commander, with a banner in one hand and a woman in the other, they say - I say take the banner, and leave the woman for me!" and again Hans laughed with the fullness of his voice. "I would strike you to laugh at us Bavarians" growled Karl, "enough flapping your tongue, it's high time we drank something again!" And the friends, swaying and holding each other in support, set off along the Ludwigstrasse in search of another tavern. It was the fine autumn day of October 7th, 1923. The Beer Hall Putsch, which put a fame on Felherrnhalle and elevated the Nazi Party, was only thirty three days away - but this is another story, having nothing to do with King Ludwig the First of Bavaria.
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Feldherrnhalle or the "Hall of the Bavarian Commanders" was built by King Ludwig as the beginning of the "new city” of Munich or Ludwigstrasse street, well designed by architect Friedrich von Gartner in 1841-1844. The building was made in the style of the Loggia Lanzie in Florence and was intended to personify the invincible spirit of the Bavarian army and to remind all Bavarians of glorious past victories and fierce battles. The grand busts of fine Tilly and prince von Wrede were cast from cannon bronze by the famous master Ludwig Schwanthaler. Later in 1882 a sculptor - Ferdinand von Miller - added a composition in honor of the victory over France. The sculptural compositions of Felderrnhalle have always served as grounds for controversy; the birth origin of Count Tilly and the military achievements of von Wrede incited a great deal of ridicule from Bavarians as a monument to the Bavarian army. Upon the memorial 2 Talers coin, the Felderrnhalle is depicted in its original form - without a central monument and lions, which were added later in 1906.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1844, FELGHERRNHALLE.
Davenport 591, KM 818, Thun 83, AKS 106, J.74, Schw. 30.
To Commemorate the completion of the Temple of Heroes in Munich.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: FELDHERRNHALLE, Building with two statues, 1844 below.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
PCGS MS 63.
Cameo strike, mirror fields. Sparkling gem. Some hairlinea and minimal scratches in the fields.
View Coin Davenport 592 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver 2T 1845 BAVARIA -BARON KREITTMAYR 592 PCGS MS 61 As usual during his Fridays, Ludwig enjoyed walking along the vibrant corridors of the palace garden and discussing the role of the individual in the history of the State. This time, his companion was his old friend and mentor Ignaz von Streber, the curator of the Numismatic Museum and the Muenzkabinet Director in charge of the Mint. The conversation, of course, focused on Napoleon Bonaparte. “You see, Ignaz, the State is nothing without a strong Ruler, and a Ruler without the State is also nothing - any dictator will need the people, who will carry him in their arms. Take Napoleon for example: only after his arrival onto the scene did France win any number of grand victories, and the map of Europe was redone, as entire governments lost their borders! All because of the actions of one person! Take Julius Caesar, too, and Alexander the Great! Caesar of course took pride in Roman democracy, yet he managed to snatch half of the world of his own accord.” - Ludwig stopped and took a sip of wine from the offered glass. “All these outcries about democracy and the senatorial power of the people are for nothing if a dictator rises to power,” he continued. “Or an Emperor - a man who can look to the future and can present it to ordinary people. And then they will all follow him like sheep to the slaughter - shall we recall Napoleon again? Actually, why even go so far? Take my famous ancestor, Elector Maximilian III Joseph, whom everyone called ‘Maximilian the Beautiful.’ He alone managed to save our country from complete collapse during the Seven-Year War, keeping the borders and essentially creating the Bavarian State as we know it, our beautiful Bavaria, the cultural center of fine art and higher education, with its singular laws and fundamental sciences.” Von Streber chimed in, coughing in embarrassment, “Forgive me, Your Majesty, you are absolutely correct. The ruler must make decisions. And Maximilian III Joseph was an absolutely outstanding personality within the history of our country, but…” he paused, “…do not forget that he was also surrounded by people of extraordinary intelligence and talent - for example the Chancellor Kreitmayr, for one - after all, it was he who wrote the Codex of the Bavarian Laws of Maximilian, the Codex Maximilianeus Bavaricus Civilic… It was necessary to be a very educated and outstanding person in order to be able to bring together hundreds of Bavarian laws and regulations in those long distant and troubled times, and Kreitmayr certainly handled the task brilliantly! By the way, Your Majesty, I would recommend that you add the Baron to your list of prominent people in Bavaria. Surely his bust is worthy of your “Hall of Fame.” Ludwig smiled, saying, “Of course, my dear Ignaz.” He looked thoughtfully at his mentor. “How could I forget? Alois Wigulaus Freyhern von Kreitmayr! My father AND grandfather had his books on their tables! The Code of Laws, Criminal Law… of course this person deserves a separate page in the history of our Bavaria. His monument is already adorned in the Maximiliansplatz - the father of the Bavarian Jurisprudence, the right hand of Maximilian Joseph, Honorary member of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences, etc…” The King thought to himself that surely the Baron was worthy of his prestigious Hall of Fame. “Furthermore!” continued Von Streber, “We prepared a sketch of the new Taler of ‘Baron Kreitmayr’ .. it will depict a monument to the Baron, and the name of this phenomenally influential individual will remain etched in the history of Bavaria forever!” The King nodded in joyous agreement as they now continued walking along the sunlit tennis courts, talking eagerly and enthusiastically about just how difficult it is to be a good king.

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The name of Baron Alois Wigulaus von Kreitmayr remained in the history of Germany as the name of the person who created a single code of laws and essentially became the father of Bavarian jurisprudence. His books Criminal Law (Codex Juris Bavarici Criminalis, 1751), Code of Civil Procedure (Codex Juris Bavarici Judicarii, 1753), and Private Law (Codex Maximilianeus Bavaricus Civilis, 1756) formed the basis of Bavarian civil and criminal law for many decades. Unfortunately, the Baron’s excessive addiction to the implementation of the death penalty as a means of capital punishment, as well as his support of using torture as a means of interrogation eventually led to his work being regarded by many as crude and artless. This led to him gradually losing popularity among the leading minds of Germany. The monument to Kreitmayr was destroyed during World War II and personified the lessons learned by Nazism, as it was decided not to restore it - now, in his place, upon the Maximiliansplatz, stands a sad figure of Schiller. But we still remember Baron von Kreitmayer - thanks for the Ludwig’s Passion and the Commemorative Two Talers coin.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1845, BARON VON KREITTMAYR.
Davenport 592, KM 820, Thun 84, AKS 107, J.75, Schw. 31.
To Commemorate the statue erected to Chancellor Baron von Kreittmayr in Munich.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: STANDBILD DES CANZLER'S FREYHERNN V. KREITTMAYR ERRICHTET IN MUNCHEN 1845, Statue of the Baron.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
PCGS MS 61.
True uncirculated coin with cameo-like strike and mirrored fields. Excessive field hairlines determined the grade.
View Coin Davenport 593 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver 2T 1845 BAVARIA - TWO GRANDSONS 593 NGC MS 62 Teresa, bending over the bush, inhaled the fragrance and admired the luxurious roses in royal garden valley. In her hands she had garden shears and she carefully cut the lush buds for a bouquet that she was planning. During this task, the king (who had just decided to take a walk in the garden) found her. At first he watched his wife, hiding in the greenery of the bushes, but then, seeing that she did not notice him, he decided to sneak closer. “But I still have a beautiful wife,” thought Ludwig, admiring the graceful and elegant bend of her back and hips, “and I, schweine husband that I am, do not pay enough attention to her! I don’t remember the last time I visited her royal bedroom .. I need to fix it and as soon as possible.” Ludwig then beamed with his fullest kingly intensity, intending to embrace his wife in his arms. Gradually, the excitement within in him grew and he, having crept up behind, grabbed his wife by the waist, circled her. “Your Majesty! Leave it! Watch out!” - flushed but pleased Teresa did not resist her husband's arms, although she was surprised at such attention – “Caution, do not hurt your back!” “What a naughty you are!” “Favorite!” - Ludwig kissed his wife tightly – “I'm a pig! I ignored the best beauty of My Kingdom! My Queen! We must fix it right now! Immediately return to the palace!”
and with this the King tried to drag Theresa along with him. “Wait, Your Majesty! - Teresa laughed. “ “Not so fast! You have not yet apologized for your behavior at the ball last week! Where are your promised gifts! Where are the treasures you were about to throw at my feet?” - and Teresa, picking up the hem of her skirt, tried to dodge her flushed husband. "Good good!” - Ludwig did not back down “ “ask what you want! Gold, diamonds, palaces! Or even better? - Ludwig beamed “ “I will issue a commemorative coin, a commemorative Taler in your honor, with your beautiful profile!”
“Thank you, Your Majesty! What an honor! Commemorative coin!” - Teresa pursed her lips resentfully - “This is certainly better than all palaces and diamonds! Although ... why not! Of course, I don’t need your coin, but you could perpetuate the memory of your grandchildren – or have you, Your Majesty, forgotten that this year you have two beautiful babies! Both, by the way, bearing your name?!” – “Alright, alright!” - Ludwig was getting hotter by the second - I agree! Let there be a commemorative coin dedicated to my beloved grandchildren! I even agree that you, Your Majesty, yourself come up with a design for this coin! Now let's go soon - I'm already exhausted from this kind of love!” - and the King carried his wife along to the royal chambers.
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The year 1845 was marked by the birth of two heirs to the Bavarian Throne of the Wittelsbach. On January 7, 1845, a son - Ludwig Leopold von Wittelsbach (aforementioned) - was born to Prince Regent Luitpold and his wife, Archduke Augusta of Austria (Augusta von Habsburg-Lotaring, Princess of Toscana), in honor of his grandfather, Ludwig I, and on August 25, 1845, the Crown Prince Maximilian and Crown Princess Maria Frederich had a son, Otto Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig, who at the insistence of his grandfather was also named Ludwig (Ludwig II) (oddly enough, King Ludwig I was also born on August 25).
Fate had prepared a sad conclusion for the young offspring of the Wittelsbach family. The first grandson went down in history as Ludwig III - the last King of Bavaria and the first Monarch in Germany, who was forced to abdicate following a revolutionary uprising - ironically, it was this very grandson who was the reigning monarch that accepted military service in the Bavarian army for foreigners .. thereby recruiting a young 25-year-old Austrian during the First World War. The name of this Austrian will soon be well known throughout the world. His name was Adolf Schicklgruber, later Adolf Hitler.
The second grandson also went down in history - as the infamous ‘Swan King’ or ‘the Fairy Tale King’. Ludwig II became famous for spending inordinate amounts of money on the building of beautiful castles, while also living in a schizophrenic world of fairytale illussions; in short, he could not properly rule the state in those difficult times for Bavaria. Consequently, his body was soon found in a nearby lake.. and Prince Regent Luitpold assumed royal duties.
But this is a completely different story.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1845, TWO GRANDSONS.
Davenport 593, KM 821, Thun 85, AKS 108, J.76, Schw. 32.
To Commemorate the birth of two Grandsons.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: LUDWIG ERBPRINZ V. B. GEB. 25 AUGUST, LUDWIG KOEN. PRINZ. V. B. GEB. 7 JANUAR, Female with two armed shields standing in front of tree. 1845 below.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
NGC MS 62.
Attractive patina, uncirculated fields, amazing design details - cabinet quality coin.
View Coin Davenport 594 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver 2GUL 1846 BAVARIA 594 NGC MS 65 As per his usual on Fridays, the King loved to meet with his old friend and mentor - who at the same time was also the Director of the royal Münzkabinet (Muenzkabinet) Ignaz von Streber (Franz Ignaz von Streber). They liked to spend a great deal of time discussing new projects related to the production of coins and medals, coinage technologies, along with floating new ideas for historical thalers meant to glorify the greatness not only of Bavaria but of the King himself. However, today they focused on the monetary system in general, and about the Gulden in particular. "Our Bavarian Guilders, they will be our national pride!" - The king exclaimed, before letting out a sigh of weariness - "this coin will be much better and more convenient than all these Prussian thalers! And tell me, dear Franz, if my memory serves me right, it was with the Gulden PARTICULARLY that the entire monetary system of the German lands began... so that we have every right to continue the traditions of our ancestors - I just dream of returning our dear Gulden to circulation!" -

"In general, you are correct" - the old numismatist looked thoughtfully at the ceiling, scratching at his wig - "it actually began with the Imperial Minting Ordinance (Reichsmuenzordnungen) of the Holy Roman Empire. As I recall, the first was Esslinger Imperial Coin Order (Reichsmuenzordnung), in November 10, 1524... It was then that the Guilders were declared an imperial coin for all German lands. And these were both gold and silver Guilders, solid and pure Reichsguldiners, equal in value to silver to a gold coin... If my memory serves me, each coin should have had 27.41 grams of pure silver. The problem was... ah, yes, the problem was that at that moment the popular coinage in circulation was the Guldengroshenes... silver and unbalanced , minted through the Barons of Schlick in Joachimsthal [thus the term Joachimstalers] ... and which contained 27.2 (!) grams of silver." After saying this, von Streber smiled as he noticed the King's attention suddenly snap back to what exactly it was that he was talking about in the first place. Resuming, "This would obviously necessitate a recall, but those are expensive... It would have been much easier to change the Coin Order again - which was done PRECISELY by Emperor Ferdinand I on July 28, 1551. The Augsburg Coin Order (Augsburger Reichsmuenzordnung) came first, and then the second statute followed on August 19, 1559, as the First could not eliminate the confusion in pure weight... statistically speaking. The First Augsburg Order had already introduced the Austrian Kreutzer as its standard imperial coin - thank God it did not spread throughout Germany, as its circulation was kept mainly south of the Main [River]. Then, the Second Imperial Augsburg Monetary Order had set the golden Gulden (Goldgulden) as equal to 75 Kreutzers, and the silver-accounting Gulden (der Reichsguldiner) was equal to 60 Kreutzers.... "

Ludwig listened intently to the old man's monotonous speech, but suddenly found himself beginning to fall asleep yet again, just as once upon a time, as a University student, he found himself surrendering to dreams under the murmurs of his old professors ... he then shook his head, trying to understand what von Streber was talking about but the thread of the conversation slipped away from him, again, his mind like a loose end, helpless to the Zarathustran wind of the old master's knowledge. "... And in the end it turned out that one Guilder was equal to 8 Zehners, which was equal to 12 Fuenfers, which amounted to 30 Halbbatzens (Albusses), which in their turn ended up somehow corresponding to 60 Kreuzers, which ultimately amounted to 240 Austrian pfennings (Pfennig) .... Your Majesty, what's wrong? ... Do you feel unwell?" von Streber started anxiously, upon seeing the thousand yard stare etched into his King's face - "Maybe if I get you some water?" The King zoned back in. "Water, what? Ah, yes ... er .. No, thanks ... But do go on, so you said, what was it, thirty Albussers ... ?" -
Ludwig had already made a hidden decision to change the subject of the conversation, but did not know how exactly to go about making it a reality. "Thus, from 1754 on, the Gulden has been, as it were, a SINGULAR counting unit, which also is 5/12 of the Convention Thaler on the Graumann Currency Reform," continued the Muenzkabinet Guardian, "but it didn't CIRCULATE like a normal coin would ..." He then could go no further, as the King lifted a finger in hasty interruption. "Excuse me, dearest Franz!" Taking the opportunity for a quick soul-burning stare into the eyes, the King then released a smile, saying, " - I completely forgot - I have an important meeting with the Minister of Trade now! We will finish tomorrow !! - Ludwig beat a retreat as he rushed off to the royal washroom. "Where are you going, Your Majesty?? I must tell you more about the Monetary Order of Zinna (Zinnaer Muenzvertrag) and Leipzig ... "- The old Munzdirector then looked after the fleeing monarch and smiled, waving his hand.
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Thus, the Gulden acquired a new quality after the Monetary Reform of 1750, carried out by Johann Philippe Graumann, Director of the Coin Administration under Frederick II in Brandenburg-Prussia. The old Reichstaler, in view of their high standard and the high cost of minting, was exchanged for the Guilders (2/3 Thaler) making it the main coin in circulation. But due to the continuing leakage of high-grade Guldens and their replacement with a lower-grade coin, in the end, a new thaler was introduced for a 14-taler coin order with a net weight of 16.7 grams, which formed the basis for the Prussian monetary system, and after that came the Dresden Convention in 1838 - uniting all of Germany. King Ludwig, in turn, fulfilled his promise and issued a coin in the form of one Gulden following Bavaria's entry into the Coin Union of German South Lands [1837]. The Bavarian Guilder was equal to 4/7 of the Prussian Thaler, or 60 Kreutzers. The same ratio remained after the reform of 1857, when the rule of the Union Thaler (Vereinsthaler) was universally and finally established.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria. King Ludwig I Series (1825-1848).
2 Gulden, 1846.
LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN, Head of the king to the right.
ZWEY GULDEN, arms of Bavaria supported by lions, crown on the top.1846 below.
Edge: Blocks.
21.2100 g., 0.9000 Silver, 0.6137 oz ASW.
Dav. 594, Thun 89, AKS 77, J. 63, Schw. 21.
NGC MS 65.
Spectacular dark-rose toning with full cartwheel underlying luster creates very unusual and sophisticated look for this uncirculated collectible coin. Practically flawless gem with minimal contact marks. Grade MS 65 is well-deserved.
View Coin Davenport 595 GERMANY - STATES - 2 Germany, Bavaria. Ludwig I (1825- 1848). Silver 2T 1846 BAVARIA - CANAL COMPLETED 595 PCGS MS 62 Baron Henry von Pechmann found himself in a state of anxious anticipation. He sat in the waiting room of the Royal Palace, waiting patiently for an audience with the King. In his hands he excitedly clutched a roll of blueprints with detailed mathematical annotations. Everything looked wonderful on paper for the great project, the brainchild of his whole life’s work since 1818… and at long last it was ready for implementation, completed and finalized in the smallest details! All that remained was only to convince the King so as to receive funding to begin the work’s initial stages - the construction of a Grand Canal that will eventually connect the unruly waters of the Danube and the Main rivers. In his dreams, he already saw how thousands of workers with picks and shovels bite as one large human mass into the German soil, turning it ton over ton… and how the outlines of the future channel cut through the map of Germany - from Bamberg to Burgthann, from Burgthann to Kelheim! Finally, the dream of all overlords come true, from the great Charlemagne to Napoleon, physically joining the North (Russian) Sea with the Black and eventually Mediterranean Sea.
The Baron had been developing the canal project from the year 1818 - when, after the victory over Napoleon in the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, the restoration of the destroyed borders and roads began and again the question arose of how best to transport goods across German lands. The construction of the canal would invaluably connect the main trade routes of the country’s north and south realms. However, the architect’s biggest concern was that the canal had to go through the European Watershed. The Baron spent several years only studying the landscape, having traveled on foot and on horseback over the future canal’s large area. Problems were everywhere - from the wetlands of the Ottmaring Valley to the old breweries in the Beilngries Caves. As a result of his painstaking work, the future route of the channel was finally complete. It was not the shortest route, although it was the most convenient from the point of local culture and preservation of historical monuments. Bamberg, Erlangen, Nuremberg, Burgthann, Neumarkt, Berching, Beilngries, Dietfurt, Kelheim .... these cities will soon become bustling shipping ports - all thanks to the Canal. Now all that remains would be to overcome the difference in altitude - because if Kelheim was 338 meters above sea level, then Voralb was already at 417 meters - and Bamberg at 230 meters above sea level! From Burgthann to Kelheim the height difference was 80 meters, and from Bamberg to Burgthann it was necessary to actually raise the water by 187 meters – such a task would have been dismissed as practically impossible in earlier days. But for Baron von Pechmann, ‘impossible’ was only an invitation! Today he will demonstrate to the King his ingenious method - how to raise a great quantity of water to the height required for proper shipping. He made use of a simple combination of locks and pump stations with delivery pipes to solve this overwhelming problem. In the Baron’s drawings, all the lock points were carefully marked in detail with their operational descriptions - a total of 100 (locks) with gates, requiring 55 lock-keepers, additional water pipes from nearby hills supplying the canal with the necessary amount of water. And now, all the titanic work of one individual over so many years was finally complete, waiting for one thing only - the seal of the King, a royal blessing to break ground and begin construction! Of course, the Baron was thrilled - the fate of his many years of work was being decided! Finally, the doors of the royal chambers opened and Ludwig rushed into the hall with open arms to meet the Baron.
“My dear Henry!” he exclaimed, “How good that you have come! I just wanted to tell you that we decided NOT to build the canal - there are too many costs and problems! It’s better we invest all the money in the construction of railways after all - it’s far more fashionable now and it’s become much much more profitable too - what’s wrong with you, my friend?” - stopped Ludwig, seeing von Pechmann's whitened face. In alarm, he called for a servant - “Bring water!!” But the Baron did not hear the King anymore - his legs gave way and the blueprints fell out of his trembling hands. His mind fell wrapped into a dark cloud as he fainted into the arms of the servant, who had come running.
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Ludwig was only joking! After Baron regaining consciousness and discussing all the details the decision was made to begin the construction of the canal along with the railways. Von Pechmann’s grand dream came true, and from 1834 to 1846, almost 6,000 workers with shovels and hoes were digging the way forward for the future channel. The Ludwig Canal was truly the singular feat of engineering for its time - locks and pumps provided the necessary water level, and upon heavily-laden paths alongside the canal, horses dragged massive barges through the openings. By 1850, the canal reached its maximum capacity, but later, starting in 1860, with the development of the railway network, the value of the canal as an artery of trade transport began to decline. Gradually the canal was abandoned and during the Second World War it was sadly destroyed by bombing raids. Now the remains of the Ludwig Canal are a favorite place for cycling for tourists and citizens, recalling the lofty projects of the supremely ambitious King of Bavaria, Ludwig I.
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German Talers since 1800 by John S. Davenport.
Bavaria, King Ludwig Series (1825 - 1848).
2 Taler 1846, LUDWIG CANAL.
Davenport 595, KM 822, Thun 86, AKS 109, J.77, Schw. 33.
To Commemorate the completion of the Ludwig Canal between the Danube and the Main rivers.
Obverse: Head of the Ludwig to the right, LUDWIG I KOENIG VON BAYERN.
Reverse: LUDWIGSCANAL, seated figures (Germania and Poseidon) holding hands, 1846 below.
37.1200 g., 0.9000 Silver, 1.0740 oz. ASW.
PCGS MS 62.
Slightly toned fields with sparkling uncirculated design. Some minimal contact marks and hairlines in the fields.

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