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Competitive Registry Orphans

Category:  Other
Owner:  coin928
Last Modified:  5/4/2021
Set Description
My NGC certified coins for which no competitive registry set exists, or in a few case where the coin is not recognized as a member of an existing set..

Set Goals
For NGC to make this an empty set!

Slot Name
Origin/Country
Item Description
Full Grade
Owner Comments
Pics
View Coin   COLOMBIA EARLY REPUBLICS 2.5C 1881(W) COPPER-NICKEL "2 1/2C" KM-179 NGC MS 65 Colombia - 1881-W 2 1/2 Centavos - KM #179 - Mintage: 24,000,000

Minted by the Waterbury Mint in Waterbury Connecticut.

Date acquired: 10/28/2012

Rev. 1/8/2016
View Coin   COLOMBIA MODERN REPUBLIC 1C 1938 KM-275 NGC MS 64 Colombia - 1 Centavo - KM #275 - Mintage: 7,920,000

Minted by the United States mint in Philadelphia for circulation in Colombia.

Date acquired: 9/14/2012 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 1/8/2016
View Coin   COLOMBIA MODERN REPUBLIC 50C 1901 BOGOTA LAZARETO - BRASS KM-L5 NGC AU 58 KM #L5 - 1901 Lazareto Leper Colony - 50 Centavaos - Mintage: 25,000

Date acquired: 9/22/2013 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 9/23/2013
View Coin   COLOMBIA MODERN REPUBLIC 50C 1934(S) KM-274 NGC MS 63 Colombia - 1934(S) KM-274 - Mintage: 10,000,000

This coin was struck at both the Philadelphia and San Francisco mints. The designer of this Bolivar bust was Roulin.

Date acquired: 9/14/2014 (already graded by NGC)

Rev 9/14/2014
View Coin   ECUADOR 2D 1895 TF PHILADELPHIA KM-51.4 NGC AU 58 Ecuador - 1895 T.F. Philadelphia - Dos Decimos (KM #51.4, EC #181) - Mintage: 5,000,000

Ecuador began adopting a decimal coinage system in 1874 with the minting of one and two centavo coins at the Mint in Birmingham, England. The transition was completed on March 22, 1884 with the creation of the silver sucre coin which was equivalent to 100 centavos. The sucre remained the official unit of currency in Ecuador for 116 years until the President of Ecuador announced on January 9, 2000 that the US dollar would be adopted as Ecuador's official currency.

This was the first coin struck by the Philadelphia mint for Ecuador, and it is the only U.S. minted Ecuadorian coin I am aware of where a proof version was also minted. I have been unable to find any record of how many proofs were minted though.

Obverse
The distinctive portrait on the obverse of this coin is that of Antonio José de Sucre. Sucre was born in 1795 in Venezuela, and from the age of 15, spent the next 20 years fighting for independence from Spanish rule. During this time he became a collaborator of Simón Bolívar, a Venezuelan general, and the first constitutional president of Bolivia, all before the age of 35. Sucre led the patriots to a decisive victory at the battle of Pichincha on May 24, 1822, effectively freeing Ecuador from Spanish rule. His life was cut short on June 4, 1830 when he was assassinated while on his way to Quito. Sucre was laid to rest in his own Mausoleum Chapel in the Cathedral of Quito. He is considered the liberator of Ecuador, and appears on many Ecuadorian coins.

Reverse
The reverse of this coin has a number of interesting features:
  • Following the tradition set by the Quito mint, the name of the city where this coin was minted appears at the bottom under the coat of arms. In this case, PHILADELPHIA giving this coin the distinction of being the first circulating coin minted by the Philadelphia mint to bear a mark specifically indicating Philadelphia as the mint of origin.
  • The denomination is DOS DECIMOS DE SUCRE. (20 centavos)
  • The weight and fineness of the silver content is explicitly stated as 5G. and 0.900 (fine) with the balance in copper.
  • Continuing the tradition of the Quito mint, every coin produced bore the initials of the assayer who was responsible for the quality of the coinage. In most Latin American mints however, these initials represent two different officials, generally the chief assayer and his deputy. It would appear that the U.S. mint was unaware of this tradition and the significance of the letters T.F. which appear to the lower right of the coat of arms on the sample coin they were give from the mint in Lima, Peru. These Lima mint assayers initials T.F. were simply copied onto the reverse die created by the Philadelphia mint and appear on all of the Dos Decimos coins minted by Philadelphia.
  • Ecuador dictated the various elements of their coat of arms, but the actual rendering of these elements can vary greatly from mint to mint. In this case the central elements of the ship, water and mountain look more like an ocean going vessel sailing away from a mountainous coastline rather than the river steamship Guayas, sailing the Guayas river with the snow capped Chimborazo volcano in the distant background. There is also no Caduceus appearing as a mast on the ship, an aspect which seems to have eluded all but one mint. The following is a depiction of the 1841 steamship Guayas for comparison:
Guayas


This coin
This coin is a well struck, although lightly worn example of this issue. The obverse die appears to have been passing midlife due to the light bleeding of the peripheral lettering into the denticles, but the reverse die appears to have been relatively fresh. This is one of the first coins to be identified as having been struck by the Philadelphia mint.

Date acquired:11/5/2006 (raw coin)
Date graded: 3/3/2016 (self submitted to NGC)

References:
Seppa, Dale and Anderson, Michael, the COINS of ECUADOR (second edition), Almanzar's Coins of the World, San Antonio, 1973.

Rev. 11/23/2018
View Coin   ECUADOR 2D 1895 TF PHILADELPHIA KM-51.4 NGC MS 63 Ecuador - 1895 T.F. Philadelphia - Dos Decimos (KM #51.4, EC #181) - Mintage: 5,000,000

Ecuador began adopting a decimal coinage system in 1874 with the minting of one and two centavo coins at the Mint in Birmingham, England. The transition was completed on March 22, 1884 with the creation of the silver sucre coin which was equivalent to 100 centavos. The sucre remained the official unit of currency in Ecuador for 116 years until the President of Ecuador announced on January 9, 2000 that the US dollar would be adopted as Ecuador's official currency.

This was the first coin struck by the Philadelphia mint for Ecuador, and it is the only U.S. minted Ecuadorian coin I am aware of where a proof version was also minted. I have been unable to find any record of how many proofs were minted though.

Obverse
The distinctive portrait on the obverse of this coin is that of Antonio José de Sucre. Sucre was born in 1795 in Venezuela, and from the age of 15, spent the next 20 years fighting for independence from Spanish rule. During this time he became a collaborator of Simón Bolívar, a Venezuelan general, and the first constitutional president of Bolivia, all before the age of 35. Sucre led the patriots to a decisive victory at the battle of Pichincha on May 24, 1822, effectively freeing Ecuador from Spanish rule. His life was cut short on June 4, 1830 when he was assassinated while on his way to Quito. Sucre was laid to rest in his own Mausoleum Chapel in the Cathedral of Quito. He is considered the liberator of Ecuador, and appears on many Ecuadorian coins.

Reverse
The reverse of this coin has a number of interesting features:
  • Following the tradition set by the Quito mint, the name of the city where this coin was minted appears at the bottom under the coat of arms. In this case, PHILADELPHIA giving this coin the distinction of being the first circulating coin minted by the Philadelphia mint to bear a mark specifically indicating Philadelphia as the mint of origin.
  • The denomination is DOS DECIMOS DE SUCRE. (20 centavos)
  • The weight and fineness of the silver content is explicitly stated as 5G. and 0.900 (fine) with the balance in copper.
  • Continuing the tradition of the Quito mint, every coin produced bore the initials of the assayer who was responsible for the quality of the coinage. In most Latin American mints however, these initials represent two different officials, generally the chief assayer and his deputy. It would appear that the U.S. mint was unaware of this tradition and the significance of the letters T.F. which appear to the lower right of the coat of arms on the sample coin they were give from the mint in Lima, Peru. These Lima mint assayers initials T.F. were simply copied onto the reverse die created by the Philadelphia mint and appear on all of the Dos Decimos coins minted by Philadelphia.
  • Ecuador dictated the various elements of their coat of arms, but the actual rendering of these elements can vary greatly from mint to mint. In this case the central elements of the ship, water and mountain look more like an ocean going vessel sailing away from a mountainous coastline rather than the river steamship Guayas, sailing the Guayas river with the snow capped Chimborazo volcano in the distant background. There is also no Caduceus appearing as a mast on the ship, an aspect which seems to have eluded all but one mint. The following is a depiction of the 1841 steamship Guayas for comparison:
Guayas


This coin
This coin is a reasonably well struck, uncirculated example of this issue. The obverse and reverse dies appear to have been relatively fresh. This is one of the first coins to be identified as having been struck by the Philadelphia mint.

Date acquired: 11/26/2019 (Already graded by NGC)

References:
Seppa, Dale and Anderson, Michael, the COINS of ECUADOR (second edition), Almanzar's Coins of the World, San Antonio, 1973.

Rev. 11/28/2019
View Coin   ECUADOR 2D 1895 TF PHILADELPHIA KM-51.4 NGC MS 63 Ecuador - 1895 T.F. Philadelphia - Dos Decimos (KM #51.4, EC #181) - Mintage: 5,000,000

Ecuador began adopting a decimal coinage system in 1874 with the minting of one and two centavo coins at the Mint in Birmingham, England. The transition was completed on March 22, 1884 with the creation of the silver sucre coin which was equivalent to 100 centavos. The sucre remained the official unit of currency in Ecuador for 116 years until the President of Ecuador announced on January 9, 2000 that the US dollar would be adopted as Ecuador's official currency.

This was the first coin struck by the Philadelphia mint for Ecuador, and it is the only U.S. minted Ecuadorian coin I am aware of where a proof version was also minted. I have been unable to find any record of how many proofs were minted though.

Obverse
The distinctive portrait on the obverse of this coin is that of Antonio José de Sucre. Sucre was born in 1795 in Venezuela, and from the age of 15, spent the next 20 years fighting for independence from Spanish rule. During this time he became a collaborator of Simón Bolívar, a Venezuelan general, and the first constitutional president of Bolivia, all before the age of 35. Sucre led the patriots to a decisive victory at the battle of Pichincha on May 24, 1822, effectively freeing Ecuador from Spanish rule. His life was cut short on June 4, 1830 when he was assassinated while on his way to Quito. Sucre was laid to rest in his own Mausoleum Chapel in the Cathedral of Quito. He is considered the liberator of Ecuador, and appears on many Ecuadorian coins.

Reverse
The reverse of this coin has a number of interesting features:
  • Following the tradition set by the Quito mint, the name of the city where this coin was minted appears at the bottom under the coat of arms. In this case, PHILADELPHIA giving this coin the distinction of being the first circulating coin minted by the Philadelphia mint to bear a mark specifically indicating Philadelphia as the mint of origin.
  • The denomination is DOS DECIMOS DE SUCRE. (20 centavos)
  • The weight and fineness of the silver content is explicitly stated as 5G. and 0.900 (fine) with the balance in copper.
  • Continuing the tradition of the Quito mint, every coin produced bore the initials of the assayer who was responsible for the quality of the coinage. In most Latin American mints however, these initials represent two different officials, generally the chief assayer and his deputy. It would appear that the U.S. mint was unaware of this tradition and the significance of the letters T.F. which appear to the lower right of the coat of arms on the sample coin they were give from the mint in Lima, Peru. These Lima mint assayers initials T.F. were simply copied onto the reverse die created by the Philadelphia mint and appear on all of the Dos Decimos coins minted by Philadelphia.
  • Ecuador dictated the various elements of their coat of arms, but the actual rendering of these elements can vary greatly from mint to mint. In this case the central elements of the ship, water and mountain look more like an ocean going vessel sailing away from a mountainous coastline rather than the river steamship Guayas, sailing the Guayas river with the snow capped Chimborazo volcano in the distant background. There is also no Caduceus appearing as a mast on the ship, an aspect which seems to have eluded all but one mint. The following is a depiction of the 1841 steamship Guayas for comparison:
Guayas


This coin
This coin is a really beautiful, well struck, uncirculated example of this issue. The obverse and reverse dies appear to have been nearly new. It really seems like it should have attained a higher grade.

Date acquired: 11/22/2019 (Raw coin)
Date graded: 8/4/2020 (self submitted to NGC)

References:
Seppa, Dale and Anderson, Michael, the COINS of ECUADOR (second edition), Almanzar's Coins of the World, San Antonio, 1973.

Rev. 9/6/2020
View Coin   ECUADOR 2D 1895 TF PHILADELPHIA KM-51.4 NGC MS 63 Ecuador - 1895 T.F. Philadelphia - Dos Decimos (KM #51.4, EC #181) - Mintage: 5,000,000

Ecuador began adopting a decimal coinage system in 1874 with the minting of one and two centavo coins at the Mint in Birmingham, England. The transition was completed on March 22, 1884 with the creation of the silver sucre coin which was equivalent to 100 centavos. The sucre remained the official unit of currency in Ecuador for 116 years until the President of Ecuador announced on January 9, 2000 that the US dollar would be adopted as Ecuador's official currency.

This was the first coin struck by the Philadelphia mint for Ecuador, and it is the only U.S. minted Ecuadorian coin I am aware of where a proof version was also minted. I have been unable to find any record of how many proofs were minted though.

Obverse
The distinctive portrait on the obverse of this coin is that of Antonio José de Sucre. Sucre was born in 1795 in Venezuela, and from the age of 15, spent the next 20 years fighting for independence from Spanish rule. During this time he became a collaborator of Simón Bolívar, a Venezuelan general, and the first constitutional president of Bolivia, all before the age of 35. Sucre led the patriots to a decisive victory at the battle of Pichincha on May 24, 1822, effectively freeing Ecuador from Spanish rule. His life was cut short on June 4, 1830 when he was assassinated while on his way to Quito. Sucre was laid to rest in his own Mausoleum Chapel in the Cathedral of Quito. He is considered the liberator of Ecuador, and appears on many Ecuadorian coins.

Reverse
The reverse of this coin has a number of interesting features:
  • Following the tradition set by the Quito mint, the name of the city where this coin was minted appears at the bottom under the coat of arms. In this case, PHILADELPHIA giving this coin the distinction of being the first circulating coin minted by the Philadelphia mint to bear a mark specifically indicating Philadelphia as the mint of origin.
  • The denomination is DOS DECIMOS DE SUCRE. (20 centavos)
  • The weight and fineness of the silver content is explicitly stated as 5G. and 0.900 (fine) with the balance in copper.
  • Continuing the tradition of the Quito mint, every coin produced bore the initials of the assayer who was responsible for the quality of the coinage. In most Latin American mints however, these initials represent two different officials, generally the chief assayer and his deputy. It would appear that the U.S. mint was unaware of this tradition and the significance of the letters T.F. which appear to the lower right of the coat of arms on the sample coin they were give from the mint in Lima, Peru. These Lima mint assayers initials T.F. were simply copied onto the reverse die created by the Philadelphia mint and appear on all of the Dos Decimos coins minted by Philadelphia.
  • Ecuador dictated the various elements of their coat of arms, but the actual rendering of these elements can vary greatly from mint to mint. In this case the central elements of the ship, water and mountain look more like an ocean going vessel sailing away from a mountainous coastline rather than the river steamship Guayas, sailing the Guayas river with the snow capped Chimborazo volcano in the distant background. There is also no Caduceus appearing as a mast on the ship, an aspect which seems to have eluded all but one mint. The following is a depiction of the 1841 steamship Guayas for comparison:
Guayas


This coin
This coin is a really beautiful, well struck, uncirculated example of this issue. The obverse and reverse dies appear to have been nearly new. Even with the two black spots on the obverse, it really seems like it should have attained a higher grade.

Date acquired: 2/2/2020 (Raw coin)
Date graded: 8/4/2020 (self submitted to NGC)

References:
Seppa, Dale and Anderson, Michael, the COINS of ECUADOR (second edition), Almanzar's Coins of the World, San Antonio, 1973.

Rev. 9/6/2020
View Coin   ECUADOR 2D 1895 TF PHILADELPHIA KM-51.4 NGC MS 64 Ecuador - 1895 T.F. Philadelphia - Dos Decimos (KM #51.4, EC #181) - Mintage: 5,000,000

Ecuador began adopting a decimal coinage system in 1874 with the minting of one and two centavo coins at the Mint in Birmingham, England. The transition was completed on March 22, 1884 with the creation of the silver sucre coin which was equivalent to 100 centavos. The sucre remained the official unit of currency in Ecuador for 116 years until the President of Ecuador announced on January 9, 2000 that the US dollar would be adopted as Ecuador's official currency.

This was the first coin struck by the Philadelphia mint for Ecuador, and it is the only U.S. minted Ecuadorian coin I am aware of where a proof version was also minted. I have been unable to find any record of how many proofs were minted though.

Obverse
The distinctive portrait on the obverse of this coin is that of Antonio José de Sucre. Sucre was born in 1795 in Venezuela, and from the age of 15, spent the next 20 years fighting for independence from Spanish rule. During this time he became a collaborator of Simón Bolívar, a Venezuelan general, and the first constitutional president of Bolivia, all before the age of 35. Sucre led the patriots to a decisive victory at the battle of Pichincha on May 24, 1822, effectively freeing Ecuador from Spanish rule. His life was cut short on June 4, 1830 when he was assassinated while on his way to Quito. Sucre was laid to rest in his own Mausoleum Chapel in the Cathedral of Quito. He is considered the liberator of Ecuador, and appears on many Ecuadorian coins.

Reverse
The reverse of this coin has a number of interesting features:
  • Following the tradition set by the Quito mint, the name of the city where this coin was minted appears at the bottom under the coat of arms. In this case, PHILADELPHIA giving this coin the distinction of being the first circulating coin minted by the Philadelphia mint to bear a mark specifically indicating Philadelphia as the mint of origin.
  • The denomination is DOS DECIMOS DE SUCRE. (20 centavos)
  • The weight and fineness of the silver content is explicitly stated as 5G. and 0.900 (fine) with the balance in copper.
  • Continuing the tradition of the Quito mint, every coin produced bore the initials of the assayer who was responsible for the quality of the coinage. In most Latin American mints however, these initials represent two different officials, generally the chief assayer and his deputy. It would appear that the U.S. mint was unaware of this tradition and the significance of the letters T.F. which appear to the lower right of the coat of arms on the sample coin they were give from the mint in Lima, Peru. These Lima mint assayers initials T.F. were simply copied onto the reverse die created by the Philadelphia mint and appear on all of the Dos Decimos coins minted by Philadelphia.
  • Ecuador dictated the various elements of their coat of arms, but the actual rendering of these elements can vary greatly from mint to mint. In this case the central elements of the ship, water and mountain look more like an ocean going vessel sailing away from a mountainous coastline rather than the river steamship Guayas, sailing the Guayas river with the snow capped Chimborazo volcano in the distant background. There is also no Caduceus appearing as a mast on the ship, an aspect which seems to have eluded all but one mint. The following is a depiction of the 1841 steamship Guayas for comparison:
Guayas


This coin
This coin is a reasonably well struck, uncirculated example of this issue. The obverse and reverse dies appear to have been relatively fresh. This is one of the first coins to be identified as having been struck by the Philadelphia mint.

Date acquired: 2/2/2020 (Raw coin)
Date graded: 8/4/2020 (self submitted to NGC)

References:
Seppa, Dale and Anderson, Michael, the COINS of ECUADOR (second edition), Almanzar's Coins of the World, San Antonio, 1973.

Rev. 8/6/2020
View Coin   EL SALVADOR 5C 1914 Elsalvador KM-124 NGC AU 55 El Salvador - 1914 5 Centavos (KM #124) - Mintage: 2,000,020 (including 20 proofs)

Minted by the Philadelphia mint for circulation in El Salvador.

Date acquired: 4/12/2013 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 4/13/2013
View Coin   EL SALVADOR 10C 1925 Elsalvador KM-130 NGC AU 58 El Salvador - 1925 10 Centavos - KM #130 - Mintage: 2,000,000
Composition: Copper-Nickel
Weight: 7.0000g
Diameter: 26mm
Struck with Medallic Rotation
REPÚBLICA DE EL SALVADOR (San Francisco - 1921, 1925, 1940, 1951, 1967, 1972, Birmingham - 1968, 1969 )

This coin bears the image of Francisco Morazán, who was Head of State in El Salvador for less than a year from July 13, 1839 to March 18, 1840. This in and of itself would not seem significant, however Francisco Morazán was also the Head of State of Honduras (1827-1830), President of the Central American Federation from 1830-1839, and Head of State of Costa Rica (1842-1842). Morazán became a martyr and a symbol of the Republic of Central America when he was executed on September 15, 1842, for attempting to restore the union. El Salvador was one of the first countries to pay tribute to Morazán, and his image appears on much of their coinage.

These 10 Centavo pieces were struck by the San Francisco mint for El Salvador in 1925. This issue was heavily circulated and even with the relatively high mintage, it is unusual to find a specimen that is this well preserved. So unusual in fact, that the Krause catalog didn't even list prices for grades above XF until recently.

At the time this coin was acquired, it was the finest know NGC graded specimen. As of this revision, only 2 have been graded higher by NGC at MS63. The fields of this coin are clean and reflective, and only the highest point detail of the devices exhibits a very light rub and a couple of scratches. A very nice coin for this difficult date.

Date acquired: 2/1/2010 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 10//5/2019
View Coin   EL SALVADOR 10C 1951 Elsalvador KM-130 NGC MS 67 El Salvador 1951 10 Centavos (KM #130) - Mintage: 1,000,000
Composition: Copper-Nickel
Weight: 7.0000g
Diameter: 26mm
Struck with Medallic Rotation
REPÚBLICA DE EL SALVADOR (San Francisco - 1921, 1925, 1940, 1951, 1967, 1972, Birmingham - 1968, 1969 )

This coin bears the image of Francisco Morazán, who was Head of State in El Salvador for less than a year from July 13, 1839 to March 18, 1840. This in and of itself would not seem significant, however Francisco Morazán was also the Head of State of Honduras (1827-1830), President of the Central American Federation from 1830-1839, and Head of State of Costa Rica (1842-1842). Morazán became a martyr and a symbol of the Republic of Central America when he was executed on September 15, 1842, for attempting to restore the union. El Salvador was one of the first countries to pay tribute to Morazán, and his image appears on much of their coinage.

This coin was minted by the San Francisco Mint for circulation in El Salvador. As of this revision, it is one of three graded at at this level with none finer by either NGC or PCGS.

Date acquired: 3/26/2013 (already graded by NGC)

Rev. 1/17/2016
View Coin   EL SALVADOR 10C 1952 Elsalvador KM-130a NGC MS 65 El Salvador 1952 10 Centavos (KM #130a) - Total Mintage: 2,000,000
336,000 struck in 1952
1,664,000 struck in 1953

Composition: Copper-Nickel-Zinc
Weight: 7.0000g
Diameter: 26mm
Struck with Medallic Rotation
REPUBLICA DE EL SALVADOR (1952 - San Francisco,1985 - Mexico City)

This coin bears the image of Francisco Morazán, who was Head of State in El Salvador for less than a year from July 13, 1839 to March 18, 1840. This in and of itself would not seem significant, however Francisco Morazán was also the Head of State of Honduras (1827-1830), President of the Central American Federation from 1830-1839, and Head of State of Costa Rica (1842-1842). Morazán became a martyr and a symbol of the Republic of Central America when he was executed on September 15, 1842, for attempting to restore the union. El Salvador was one of the first countries to pay tribute to Morazán, and his image appears on much of their coinage.

This coin was minted by the San Francisco Mint for circulation in El Salvador. As of this revision, it is one of nine graded at at this level by NGC with only one finer.

When I first received this coin, it took me a little time to figure out what made KM-130a different from KM-130 which preceded it. After a bit of study, I realized that the only element that distinguishes a KM-130 a from a KM-130 is that the "Ú" in REPÚBLICA was changed to a "U." 1952 was the only year that the US Mint struck KM130a. 15,000,000 more KM-130a design Ten Centavos were however struck by the Mexico City mint in 1985. KM-130 style Ten Centavo coins were again struck in 1967 and 1972 by the US Mint and in 1968 and 1969 by the Birmingham mint.

Date acquired: 1/10/2016 (already graded by NGC)

Rev. 1/17/2016
View Coin   EL SALVADOR 25C 1944 Elsalvador KM-136 NGC MS 66 El Salvador 1944 25 Centavos (KM #136) - Mintage: 1,000,000

This coin bears the image of Francisco Morazán, who was Head of State in El Salvador for less than a year from July 13, 1839 to March 18, 1840. This in and of itself would not seem significant, however Francisco Morazán was also the Head of State of Honduras (1827-1830), President of the Central American Federation from 1830-1839, and Head of State of Costa Rica (1842-1842). Morazán became a martyr and a symbol of the Republic of Central America when he was executed on September 15, 1842, for attempting to restore the union. El Salvador was one of the first countries to pay tribute to Morazán, and his image appears on much of their coinage.

This coin was minted by the San Francisco Mint for circulation in El Salvador. As of this revision, it is one of only three graded at at this level with none finer by either NGC or PCGS.

Date acquired: 3/26/2013 (already graded by NGC)

Rev. 11/28/2015
View Coin   GUATEMALA - REPUBLIC 1C 1943 KM-251 NGC MS 65 Guatemala 1943 Centavos (KM #251) Brass - Mintage: 450,000

This coin was minted by the Philadelphia Mint during World War II using brass recovered from spent artillery shell casings.

As of this revision, it is one of 7 graded at at this level with only 2 graded finer by NGC.

Date acquired:5/21/2013 (already graded by NGC)

Rev. 11/28/2015
View Coin   GUATEMALA - REPUBLIC 2C 1944 KM-252 NGC MS 65 Guatemala - 1944 (S) - 2 Centavos Brass (KM #252) - Mintage: 1,100,000

This coins was struck at the San Francisco mint during World War II from brass recovered from spent artillery shell casings, and is extremely rare in this this grade.

Currently one of the five finest known graded by NGC.

Date acquired: 12/2/2015

Rev. 11/29/2015
View Coin   HONDURAS 1C 1935 KM-77.1 NGC MS 64 RB Honduras - 1935 Centavo - KM-77.1 - Mintage:2,000,000

Struck by the Philadelphia mint for circulation in Honduras.

Date acquired: 1/19/2020 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 1/19/2020
View Coin   HONDURAS 1C 1957 KM-77.2 NGC MS 65 RD Honduras - 1957 Centavo (KM #77.2) - Mintage: 28,000,000

Beautiful red example of the relatively common date.

Over date 1957/56 also exist.

Date acquired: 4/17/2014 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 4/17/2014
View Coin   HONDURAS 2C 1939 KM-78 NGC MS 66 RD Honduras - 1939 2 Centavos - KM-78 - Mintage: 2,000,000

Minted by the Philadelphia mint for circulation in Honduras.

Date acquired: 1/19/2020 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 1/19/2020
View Coin   HONDURAS 2C 1956 KM-78 NGC MS 67 RB Honduras - 1956 2 Centavos - KM-78 - Mintage: 20,000,000

Minted by the Philadelphia mint for circulation in Honduras. The is a very common coin in a very uncommon condition. As of this revision, this is the single finest known RB specimen graded by either NGC or PCGS. There are however 2 finer graded by NGC at MS67RD.

Date acquired: 3/3/2014 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 3/3/2014
View Coin   HONDURAS 5C 1932 KM-72.1 NGC MS 64 Honduras - 1932 5 Centavos - KM #72.1 - Mintage: 1,000,000

Minted by the Philadelphia Mint for circulation in Honduras.

Date acquired: 11/22/2014 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 11/22/2014
View Coin   HONDURAS 10C 1932 KM-76.1 NGC MS 65 Honduras - 1932 10 Centavos (KM #76.1) - Mintage: 1,500,000

Minted by the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia for circulation in Honduras.

Date acquired: 10/14/2014 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 10/15/2014
View Coin   HONDURAS 10C 1951 KM-76.1 NGC MS 64 Honduras - 1951 10 Centavos (KM #76.1) - Mintage: 1,000,000

Minted by the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia for circulation in Honduras.

Date acquired: 11/27/2014 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 11/27/2014
View Coin   HONDURAS 50C 1951 KM-74 NGC MS 62 Honduras - 1951 50 Centavos - KM #74 - Mintage: 500,000

Minted by the Philadelphia Mint for circulation in Honduras.

Date acquired: 3/8/2015 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev 9/14/2015
View Coin   HONDURAS 50C 1951 KM-74 NGC MS 67 Honduras - 1951 50 Centavos - KM #74 - Mintage: 500,000

Minted by the Philadelphia Mint for circulation in Honduras.

As of this revision, this is the finest know example of this date and denomination.

Date acquired: 9/13/2015 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev 9/22/2015
View Coin   LIBERIA 1/2C 1941 KM-10a NGC MS 65 Liberia - 1941 1/2 cent - KM #10a - Mintage: 250,000

Minted by the Philadelphia mint for circulation in Liberia. These coins had been struck by the mint in Birmingham, England but during the war, the original Birmingham dies were sent to the Philadelphia mint for striking.

This design was struck in Half Cent, One Cent, and Two Cent denominations. The Half and Two Cent denominations must not have been received well because high grade samples of each are relatively easy to find. The one Cent coin however must have been quite popular because these are quite difficult to obtain.

Date acquired: 5/1/2011 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 11/29/2015
View Coin   LIBERIA 2C 1941 KM-12a NGC MS 65 Liberia - 1941 2 cent - KM #12a - Mintage: 810,000

Minted by the Philadelphia mint for circulation in Liberia. These coins had been struck by the mint in Birmingham, England but during the war, the original Birmingham dies were sent to the Philadelphia mint for striking.

This design was struck in Half Cent, One Cent, and Two Cent denominations. The Half and Two Cent denominations must not have been received well because high grade samples of each are relatively easy to find. The one Cent coin however must have been quite popular because these are quite difficult to obtain.

Date acquired: 7/4/2011 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 11/28/2015
View Coin   MEXICO - 1905 TO DATE 1C 1914 DURANGO ALUMINUM KM-628 NGC MS 63 Mexico (Durango) - 1914 Centavo - KM #628 - Mintage: Unknown

This One Centavo piece was struck in aluminum by a private company in Denver Colorado for the State of Durango, Mexico during the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1917. A brass Five Centavo piece was also struck by the same company in 1914. There are no definitive records, but it is believed that both coins were struck by the Denver Novelty Works and Manufacturing Company. The mintages for both coins are unknown. This particular coin is a very well struck, lustrous example of this seemingly common issue. While not minted by the US Mint, it was minted in the USA, and qualifies for inclusion in this custom set.

Date acquired: 12/12/2010 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 1/14/2016
View Coin   MEXICO - 1905 TO DATE 5C 1914 DURANGO EAGLE - BRASS KM-634 NGC MS 64 Mexico (Durango) - 1914 5 Centavos - KM #634 - Mintage: Unknown

This Five Centavo piece was struck in brass by a private company in Denver Colorado for the State of Durango, Mexico during the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1917. An aluminum Centavo piece was also struck by the same company in 1914. There are no definitive records, but it is believed that both coins were struck by the Denver Novelty Works and Manufacturing Company. The mintages for both coins are unknown. This particular coin is a very well struck, lustrous example of this probably common issue. While not minted by the US Mint, it was minted in the USA, and qualifies for inclusion in my custom sets.

Date acquired: 10/25/2017 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 10/26/2017
View Coin   MEXICO - 1823-1909 PESO 1898MO AM RESTRIKE KM-409.2 NGC MS 63 Mexico - 1898Mo AM Restrike (1949) - reverse with 134 beads - Peso - (KM# 409.2) Mintage:2,000,000
Composition: .9027 silver, .0973 copper.

This is a very interesting coin for a variety of reasons. It was not struck in 1898, nor was it struck in Mexico City, nor was it struck for Mexico! It was actually struck by the US Mint in San Francisco in 1949 for Chiang Kai-Shek’s Nationalist Chinese government.

To quote Altz & Barton, "This 1949 coinage represents a restrike issue of a Peso originally struck at Mexico City in 1898. The coins bear the date 1898 and are identical with the 1898 issue in design and composition, with only one small difference. On the Pesos actually struck in 1898, there are 139 denticles in the border on the reverse while the 1949 restrikes have only 131 denticles. This is the only U.S.-struck coin of Mexico which can be identified without a doubt as originating in the United States. All others were also stuck at the Mexico City mint from identical dies."

The above quote is accurate with two exception. There are actually 134 denticles on the reverse (which, by the way is mounted as the obverse by NGC). Krause & Mishler designate the obverse as the side with the Eagle on it and the date side as the reverse, which is the same way Altz & Barton describe it. K&M also specify 134 denticles, and they are correct. I counted them. The other, much less tedious way to differentiate between the original and the restrike is by examining the Mexico City mint mark. The original coins have the tops of the mint mark (Mo) lined up, while the o in Mo is higher than the M on the restrike.

According to an article in the September 5, 2016 issue of Coin World, this 1898 silver peso of Mexico was actually struck for Chiang Kai-Shek’s Nationalist Chinese government when they introduced a new silver based currency during the Chinese Civil War following World War II. American support for the Nationalists included several billion dollars’ worth of aid and military hardware, and even 55,000 U.S. troops for a short time. Inflation was rampant in areas still controlled by the Nationalists, and they were ultimately forced out of mainland China by Mao Tse-Tung’s Communists.

Date acquired: 6/4/2014 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 7/6/2019
View Coin   N.E.INDIES CENT 1942P N.e.indies KM-317 NGC MS 65 RD Netherlands East Indies - 1942P 1 Cent - KM #317 - Mintage:100,000,000

This coin was minted by the Philadelphia mint during World War II for the Dutch colony now known as Indonesia, and it even bears the "P" mint mark just below the date on the right side of the obverse. It also has the Palm tree privy mark (to the left of the denomination) which was used by the Dutch mints to distinguish similar looking coinage intended for the colonies from that intended for circulation in the The Netherlands where the acorn privy mark was used.. The Palm tree appears on nearly all colonial coinage even though in this case there would have been no confusion given the reverse of this coin.

An interesting characteristic of the One Cent coins in this series is that they appear to be struck with medalic rotation while all of the other denominations struck for the Netherlands East Indies were struck with the normal "coin" rotation.

This particular coin is a beautiful full red high grade example of this otherwise very common date. It was also selected by NGC to be the Plate coin for the Coin Values web page.

Date acquired: 1/17/2008 (Raw coin)
Date graded: 10/30/2015 (Self Submitted)

Rev. 12/2/2015
View Coin   N.E.INDIES CENT 1942P N.e.indies KM-317 NGC MS 66 RD Netherlands East Indies - 1942P 1 Cent - KM #317 - Mintage:100,000,000

Obverse: 3/4 spray around hole in center with value below.
Obverse Legend: NEDERLANDSCH INDIE (Netherlands Indies) and date
Reverse: Arabic text reiterating the denomination of the coin with flowers below hole.
Reverse Legend: Javanese text reiterating the denomination of the coin.
Edge: Plain

This coin was minted by the Philadelphia mint during World War II for the Dutch colony now known as Indonesia, and it even bears the "P" mint mark just below the date on the right side of the obverse. It also has the Palm tree privy mark (to the left of the denomination) which was used by the Dutch mints to distinguish similar looking coinage intended for the colonies from that intended for circulation in the The Netherlands where the acorn privy mark was used.. The Palm tree appears on nearly all colonial coinage even though in this case there would have been no confusion given the reverse of this coin.

An interesting characteristic of the One Cent coins in this series is that they appear to be struck with medalic rotation while all of the other denominations struck for the Netherlands East Indies were struck with the normal "coin" rotation.

This particular coin is a beautiful high grade red example of this otherwise common date. As of this revision, there are none graded finer by NGC.

Date acquired: 1/17/2008 (raw coin)
Date graded: 9/28/2018 (self submitted to NGC)

Rev. 10/4/2018
View Coin   N.E.INDIES CENT 1945P N.e.indies KM-317 NGC MS 66 Red Brown Netherlands East Indies - 1945P 1 Cent - KM #317 - Mintage: 335,000,000
184,003,000 minted in 1945
150,997,000 minted in 1946, but still dated 1945

This coin was minted by the Philadelphia mint during World War II for the Dutch colony now known as Indonesia, and it even bears the "P" mint mark just below the date on the right side of the obverse. It also has the Palm tree privy mark (to the left of the denomination) which was used by the Dutch mints to distinguish similar looking coinage intended for the colonies from that intended for circulation in the The Netherlands where the acorn privy mark was used. The Palm Tree appears on nearly all colonial coinage even though in this case there would have been no confusion given the reverse of this coin.

An interesting characteristic of the One Cent coins in this series is that they appear to be struck with medalic rotation while all of the other denominations struck for the Netherlands East Indies were struck with the normal "coin" rotation.

This coin is a pleasing high grade red brown specimen.

Varieties: P over S mint mark varieties are known to exist, and the author owns one.

Date acquired: 7/8/2007 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 1/17/2016
View Coin   N.E.INDIES CENT 1945D N.e.indies KM-317 NGC MS 65 RD Netherlands East Indies - 1945D 1 Cent - KM #317 - Mintage: 133,800,000

Composition: Bronze
Weight:.......... 4.8000g
Diameter:...... 23mm
Edge:............. Plain

The obverse identifies the coins as having been minted for NEDERLANDSCH INDIE in 1945 by the Denver mint, the D mint mark appearing just below the date on the right side. A palm tree privy mark also appears on the coin on the left side between the denomination of "1 Ct" and the "N" of NEDERLANDSCH. The palm tree privy mark was used on all dutch colonial coins minted by the US mints from 1941 through 1945. An acorn privy mark was used on cons minted for the Dutch homeland of the Netherlands during those years. In only one case was the privy mark actually necessary to differentiate where the coin was intended to circulate. There is no need to make that distinction on the coins struck for the Dutch East Indies, but the palm tree privy mark appears on every design struck for Dutch colonies by the US mints. The only other obverse design element is most likely a rice panicle which surrounds the center hole.

The reverse of this coin is predominately in Javanese script, but also Arabic script which phonetically reads from Indonesian 'Syukur pada Allah', above the hole, and 'Rupiah' below the hole. Translated to English, 'give thanks to God' and 'rupiah', the unit of currency still used in Indonesia today. The flowers at the bottom of the reverse may be Jasmine Sambac, but I am not absolutely certain of that.

One other odd thing about these coins is their die orientation. The One Cent coins were minted with medalic rotation while ALL other coins minted for the Netherlands and the Dutch colonies of Curacao, Suriname, and the Netherlands East Indies were minted with Coin rotation.

There are four of these coins graded by NGC as RED, two in MS65RD, and two in MS67RD for this date. Unfortunately, this one was placed in the holder backwards!

Date acquired: 2/1/2012 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 5/10/2016
View Coin   N.E.INDIES CENT 1945D N.e.indies KM-317 NGC MS 66 RD Netherlands East Indies - 1945D 1 Cent - KM #317 - Mintage: 133,800,000

This coin was minted by the Denver mint during World War II for the Dutch colony now known as Indonesia, and it even bears the "D" mint mark just below the date on the right side of the obverse. It also has the Palm tree privy mark (to the left of the denomination) which was used by the Dutch mints to distinguish similar looking coinage intended for the colonies from that intended for circulation in the The Netherlands where the acorn privy mark was used. The Palm Tree appears on nearly all colonial coinage even though in this case there would have been no confusion given the reverse of this coin.

An interesting characteristic of the One Cent coins in this series is that they appear to be struck with medalic rotation while all of the other denominations struck for the Netherlands East Indies were struck with the normal "coin" rotation.

This coin is a very attractive, full red MS66 coin with few equal or finer.

Date acquired: 2/10/2008 (Raw coin)
Date graded: 10/28/2015 (Self submitted to NGC)

Rev. 12/2/2015
View Coin   N.E.INDIES CENT 1945D N.e.indies KM-317 NGC MS 67 RD Netherlands East Indies - 1945D 1 Cent - KM #317 - Mintage: 133,800,000

Obverse: 3/4 spray around hole in center with value below.
Obverse Legend: NEDERLANDSCH INDIE (Netherlands Indies) and date
Reverse: Arabic text reiterating the denomination of the coin with flowers below hole.
Reverse Legend: Javanese text reiterating the denomination of the coin.
Edge: Plain

This coin was minted by the Denver mint during World War II for the Dutch colony now known as Indonesia, and it even bears the "D" mint mark just below the date on the right side of the obverse. It also has the Palm tree privy mark (to the left of the denomination) which was used by the Dutch mints to distinguish similar looking coinage intended for the colonies from that intended for circulation in the The Netherlands where the acorn privy mark was used. The Palm Tree appears on nearly all colonial coinage even though in this case there would have been no confusion given the reverse of this coin.

An interesting characteristic of the One Cent coins in this series is that they appear to be struck with medalic rotation while all of the other denominations struck for the Netherlands East Indies were struck with the normal "coin" rotation.

This coin is a very attractive, full red, nearly flawless example of this relatively common issue. As of this revision, it has few equals and none certified finer.

Date acquired: 11/3/2011 (Raw coin)
Date graded: 9/28/2018 (Self submitted to NGC)

Rev. 12/5/2018
View Coin   N.E.INDIES CENT 1945S N.e.indies KM-317 NGC MS 66 RD Netherlands East Indies - 1945S 1 Cent - KM #317 Mintage 102,568,000
59,852,000 minted in 1945
42,716,000 minted in 1946, but still dated 1945

Obverse: 3/4 spray around hole in center with value below.
Obverse Legend: NEDERLANDSCH INDIE (Netherlands Indies) and date
Reverse: Arabic text reiterating the denomination of the coin with flowers below hole.
Reverse Legend: Javanese text reiterating the denomination of the coin.
Edge: Plain

This coin was minted by the San Francisco mint during World War II for the Dutch colony now known as Indonesia, and it even bears the "S" mint mark just below the date on the right side of the obverse. It also has the Palm tree privy mark (to the left of the denomination) which was used by the Dutch mints to distinguish similar looking coinage intended for the colonies from that intended for circulation in the The Netherlands where the acorn privy mark was used. The Palm Tree appears on nearly all colonial coinage even though in this case there would have been no confusion given the reverse of this coin.

An interesting characteristic of the One Cent coins in this series is that they appear to be struck with medalic rotation while all of the other denominations struck for the Netherlands East Indies were struck with the normal "coin" rotation.

These coins are not rare, but full red specimens are not all that common. NGC has graded only 7 in red, 5 at 66 and 2 at 67.

Date acquired: 3/22/2008 (Raw coin)
Date graded: 9/26/2012 (Self submitted to NGC).

Rev. 9/22/2019
View Coin   N.E.INDIES 1/10G 1942S N.e.indies KM-318 NGC MS 67 Netherlands East Indies - 1942S 1/10 G - KM #318 - Mintage: 75,000,000

Obverse: Crowned Shield from the coat of arms dividing the denomination
Obverse Legend: NEDERL. INDIE. (Netherlands Indies)
Reverse: Arabic text reiterating the denomination of the coin.
Reverse Legend: Javanese text reiterating the denomination of the coin.
Edge: Reeded

This coin was minted by the San Francisco mint during World War II for the Dutch colony now known as Indonesia, and it even bears the "S" mint mark to the right of the date. It also has the Palm tree privy mark which was used by the Dutch mints to distinguish similar looking coinage intended for the colonies from that intended for circulation in the The Netherlands where the acorn privy mark was used.. The Palm tree appears on nearly all colonial coinage even though in this case there would have been no confusion given the reverse of this coin.

The primary element on the obverse is the central shield from the Dutch coat of arms topped by the Dutch royal crown. The background (field) of the shield is azure which is a dark royal blue that is represented by horizontal lines in engraving. Also part of the background is gold billetty which are vertically oriented gold blocks, twice as long as they are wide, arranged in rows but not directly underneath each other. A hatched pattern of dots is used in engraving to represent the gold color of the billets. The lion is rampant (standing on his back legs), crowned with a coronet, and is also gold with a red tongue and red claws. In his sinister (left front) paw he is holding seven silver arrows bound together with a gold ribbon, representing the seven provinces of the Union of Utrecht. In his dexter (right front) paw he is brandishing a silver sword with a golden hilt representing the determination to defend their liberty.

As of this revision, this is 1 of only 2 graded MS67 by NGC with none finer.

Date acquired: 2/1/2006 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 12/5/2018
View Coin   N.E.INDIES 1/10G 1945P N.e.indies P POINTS TO CENTER OF 5 KM-318 NGC MS 66 Netherlands East Indies - 1945P 1/10 G (Normal Mint Mark) - KM #318 - Mintage: 100,720,000

Obverse: Crowned Shield from the coat of arms dividing the denomination
Obverse Legend: NEDERL. INDIE. (Netherlands Indies)
Reverse: Arabic text reiterating the denomination of the coin.
Reverse Legend: Javanese text reiterating the denomination of the coin.
Edge: Reeded

This coin was minted by the Philadelphia mint during World War II for the Dutch colony now known as Indonesia, and it even bears the "P" mint mark to the right of the date. It also has the Palm tree privy mark which was used by the Dutch mints to distinguish similar looking coinage intended for the colonies from that intended for circulation in the The Netherlands where the acorn privy mark was used. The Palm Tree appears on nearly all colonial coinage even though in this case there would have been no confusion given the reverse of this coin.

The primary element on the obverse is the central shield from the Dutch coat of arms topped by the Dutch royal crown. The background (field) of the shield is azure which is a dark royal blue that is represented by horizontal lines in engraving. Also part of the background is gold billetty which are vertically oriented gold blocks, twice as long as they are wide, arranged in rows but not directly underneath each other. A hatched pattern of dots is used in engraving to represent the gold color of the billets. The lion is rampant (standing on his back legs), crowned with a coronet, and is also gold with a red tongue and red claws. In his sinister (left front) paw he is holding seven silver arrows bound together with a gold ribbon, representing the seven provinces of the Union of Utrecht. In his dexter (right front) paw he is brandishing a silver sword with a golden hilt representing the determination to defend their liberty.

There are two varieties for this date minted in Philadelphia based on the orientation of the "P" with respect to the "5" in the date. This coin exhibits the normal orientation in which the base of the "P" points to the middle of the "5" in the date, not the top. This variety attribution appears on the label "P points to center of 5" and is identified in K&M as "Normal P.".

Date acquired: 57/2008 (Raw coin)
Date graded: 10/28/2015 (Self submitted to NGC)
Date Corrected: 8/2/2017 (Attribution corrected to "P points to center of 5")

Rev. 12/5/2018
View Coin   N.E.INDIES 1/4G 1941P N.e.indies KM-319 NGC MS 65 Netherlands East Indies - 1941P 1/4 G - KM #319 - Mintage: 34,947,000

This coin was minted by the Philadelphia mint during World War II for the Dutch colony now known as Indonesia, and it even bears the "P" mint mark to the right of the date. It also has the Palm tree privy mark which was used by the Dutch mints to distinguish similar looking coinage intended for the colonies from that intended for circulation in the The Netherlands. The privy mark on those coins is an acorn. The Palm tree was used on nearly all colonial coinage even though in this case there would have been no confusion given the reverse of this coin.

It should be noted that the claim made on the U.S. Mint web site that 1942 was the first year that the Philadelphia mint identified itself on a coin using the "P" mint mark is clearly NOT true. The Philadelphia mint produced no less than four different coins in 1941 bearing a "P" mint mark. The others are the Netherlands East Indies 1/10G., and the 10 and 25 Cent coins minted for Curaçao and Suriname. To be completely accurate, the Philadelphia mint first identified itself on a coin intended for circulation 47 years earlier. "Philadelphia" is fully spelled out on the reverse of the Dos Decimos de Sucre minted for Ecuador in 1895!

This particular coin is softly struck in the date area of the obverse, but otherwise.well deserving of the grade.

Date acquired: 11/25/2015 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 12/1/2015
View Coin   Nepal RUPEE VS2030(1973) NEPAL KM-828.1 NGC PF 67 CA Nepal - VS2030(1973) - Rupee - KM #828.1 - Mintage: 8,891 Proof only

These coins were only issued as part of a seven coin proof set produced and packaged by the US Mint. (KM #PS6). The packaging for these proof sets looks very similar to the US proof set issued in the same year. Unfortunately the insert that held the coins inside the sealed plastic holder reacted with most of the coins in the set. This coin is no exception, and it shows some spotting and edge discoloration. While this coin is not particularly valuable, it is an interesting and unusual piece with the distinction of having been minted by the San Francisco mint.

Date acquired: 12/12/2010 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 1/14/2016
View Coin   NETHERLANDS 1817 TO DATE 25C 1943P(ACORN) Netherland SILVER KM-164 NGC MS 65 Netherlands - 1943P (Acorn) 25 Cents - KM #164 - Mintage: Unknown

These coins are not listed in the U.S. mint report for 1943. The first reported listing is in 1944 with a total mintage of 40,000,000. Coins dated 1944P with the acorn privy mark also exist, so it must be assumed that the total mintage reported in 1944 is for the fiscal year running from July 1, 1943 through June 30, 1944. The exact mintage for each year is unknown. An identical coin bearing a palm tree privy mark in place of the acorn was minted for use in Curacao and Suriname.

This particular coin is a spectacular example of this relatively common coin. As of this revision, it is the finest and only mint state specimen to have been graded by NGC.

Date acquired: 4/4/2010 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 11/28/2015
View Coin   NETHERLANDS 1817 TO DATE 25C 1944P Netherland KM-164 NGC MS 65 Netherlands - 1944P (Acorn) 25 Cents - KM #164 - Mintage: less than 40,000,000

These coins are listed in the U.S. mint report for 1944 with a mintage of 40,000,000, however this number also includes mintage of the coins dated 1943. The fiscal reporting year runs from July 1, 1943 through June 30, 1944, so the exact mintage for each year is unknown. An identical coin bearing a palm tree privy mark in place of the acorn was minted for use in Curacao and Suriname.

This particular coin is a very well preserved example of this relatively common coin. As of this revision, this is one of the two finest mint state specimens to have been graded by NGC (2/0).

Date acquired: 11/27/2014 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 11/27/2014
View Coin   NICARAGUA 25C 1943 KM-23 NGC MS 63 Nicaragua - 1943(P) 25 Centavos - (KM # 23) - Mintage: 1,000,000

This coin was minted by the Philadelphia Mint during World War II using brass recovered from spent artillery shell casings.

The obverse is composed of the bust of Francisco Hernandez de Cordoba, facing right, surrounded by the text "REPÚBLICA DE NICARAGUA" (Republic of Nicaragua) with the date below.

The reverse shows a smiling sun rising behind a range of five mountains representing the five original nations of the Federal Republic of Central America. The text above states "ENDIOS CONFIAMOS" (In God We Trust) and the denomination below is 25 CENTAVOS DE CORDÓBA.

Date acquired: 4/4/2021 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 4/5/2021
View Coin   PERU - DECIMAL 1C 1864 BRONZE OFF METAL STRIKE KM-187.1a (KM-TS2) NGC MS 63 RB Peru - 1864 One Cent (Bronze) - KM-187.1a (aka KM-TS2) - Mintage: Unknown in Bronze
Minted by the private mint of Holmes, Booth & Hayden, Waterbury, Connecticut.

A monetary law enacted in Peru on September 28, 1857 provided for a one-centimo coin to replace the quarter real in everyday commercial transactions. At this same time, the United States was making a transition from large cents to the smaller flying eagle cent. The law was never placed into effect though, primarily because it stated that the one-centimo coin be made of refined copper, unalloyed with other metals, and of such a weight that its intrinsic value would correspond to its nominal value. It was soon realized that the coins would disappear quickly as the value of copper increased.

The United States was experimenting with various alloys at the same time for replacing the copper large cents currently in circulation. Although an alloy of 95% copper, with the remainder a suitable mixture of tin and zinc, was originally suggested, an alloy of 88% copper and 12% nickel was ultimately adopted for the Flying Eagle cent of 1857.
.
A new Peruvian monetary law was passed on January 31, 1863 that revised the composition and design of the new copper coinage as follows:

There shall be two copper coins, the first of 2 centavos value, and the second of 1 centavo, both corresponding to the value of the metal and the cost of manufacture. The copper coin shall have in the center of the obverse a sun, around it the inscription REPUBLICA PERUANA (Peruvian Republic), and the date at the top part; on the reverse the word DOS (two) or UN (one) CENTAVO, surrounded by a wreath formed by two cornucopias. The amount of copper that may be issued shall not exceed the value of 300, 000 soles. No one is obliged to receive copper coins but for a value less than 5 centavos.

The coins were to be struck in the United States and there are many correspondences between the Peruvian government and officials at the U.S. Mint. The U.S. Mint could not strike the coins for Peru in 1863 since the law permitting striking of foreign coinage would not be passed until 1874. Director of the U. S. Mint, James Pollock, did however offer to have the engraving department of the U.S. Mint provide the dies for striking the coins when he wrote: Mr. A. C. Paquet, of the Engraving Department of the Mint and a competent artist, will undertake the preparation of your Dies, during the hours that he is not engaged in the performance of his Mint duties. That's not what happened though and the coins were actually designed by an unknown Philadelphia artist, with the dies and hubs being prepared by A. C. Paquet.

The alloy to be used was specified to be the same as that for the U.S. cents of the day, but the weight would be determined based on the relative value of the U.S. silver dollar and the Peruvian silver Sol. The U.S. Mint could not strike the coins for Peru, but did suggest that the firm of Morgan and Orr might be able to produce the coins. Horace P. Flatt described these coins in great detail in an article in The Numismatist in 1984, but at that time, it was unknown to him where these coins were actually struck, but it was commonly accepted to have been by a private firm in Philadelphia. In 1988 however, in a letter to the editor published in The Numismatist, he revealed that the coins were in fact struck by the private mint of Holmes, Booth and Hayden in Waterbury, Connecticut. I have nothing to corroborate that, but Horace P. Flatt appears to be a very meticulous researcher, and I have no particular reason to doubt the veracity of his assertion.

The metal was supplied by the Camden Nickel Works of Camden, New Jersey, which was owned by "Nickel King" Joseph Wharton of Philadelphia. Wharton reported that 10,000,000 one-centavo coins and 5,000,000 two-centavo coins were produced accounting for 200,000 of the 300,000 soles worth of the coins Peru had authorized. However, this does not correlate with the mintages reported for these coins. All of my sources indicate that a total of 1,000,000 Centavos were struck for 1863 an 1864 combined. The exact number struck for each date being unknown. The exact same numbers are indicated for the two centavos struck for 1863-64.

All of these coins were likely struck in the second half of 1863 and early in 1864. The choice of copper nickel composition had been a point of concern with U.S. mint officials since it was chosen. Just as the coins began arriving in Peru, recommendations were being made to change the composition to 95% copper for U.S. cents. Wharton lobbied vehemently against the change, but it was ultimately accepted and signed into law by the U.S. Coinage Act of April 22, 1864. It appears that the vast majority of coins had been struck before the U.S. composition change, but bronze examples of both the one and two centavos like this one dated 1864 do exist. The bronze one centavos are very rare compared to the bronze two centavos.

There are two known design varieties for the 1863 one centavo. The first, which is presumed to be quite scarce, exhibits six incuse lines in the cornucopia on the reverse. The more common variety and all of the one centavos struck in 1864 are the five line variety. Interestingly, all of the two centavos coins for both years exhibit six incuse lines in the cornucopia on the reverse.

This Coin
This particular coin is the very rare variety one centavo struck in bronze in 1864. Only two of these have been graded by NGC and both are MS63RB.

Varieties
6 Incuse lines on rev. (88% copper and 12% nickel) - 1863 only, less common variety
5 Incuse lines on rev. (88% copper and 12% nickel) - 1863 and 1864, common variety
5 Incuse lines on rev. (95% copper, 4% tin, and 1% zinc) - 1864 only, very rare (this coin)

Sources
  1. Day, Thomas C. "Joseph Wharton and Nickel Coinage," The Numismatist, Vol. 100, No. 10,1987, pp. 2109-2114.
  2. Flatt, Horace P., "Peruvian Centavos," The Numismatist, Vol 97, No. 2 1984, pp. 254-261.
  3. Flatt, Horace P., "The First Foreign Coins Struck at the Philadelphia Mint," The Numismatist, Vol 99, No. 1 1986, pp. 38-43.
  4. Flatt, Horace P., "Authority Commends and Corrects Lima Mint Article," Letter to the Editor, The Numismatist, Vol 101, No. 10 1988, pp.1697-1699.
  5. Murray, Glenn S., "Exploring the Historic Lima Mint," The Numismatist, Vol 101, No. 7 1988, pp. 1200-1212.
Date acquired: 6/16/2020 (already graded by NGC)

Rev. 8/6/2020
View Coin   PERU - DECIMAL 2C 1919 KM-A212 NGC UNC Details Peru - 1919 2 Centavos - KM #A212 - Mintage: 3,000,000

Minted by the US Mint in Philadelphia for circulation in Peru.

This is a great looking coin, but NGC decided that was because the color has been altered. So it goes...

Date acquired: 12/23/2014 (raw coin)
Date graded: 7/27/2020 (self submitted to NGC)

Rev. 9/6/2020
View Coin   United States SC$1 1940 CA HK-483 PETROLEUM DOLLAR GOLDEN GATE EXPOSITION GOLDEN GATE EXPOSITION NGC MS 66 HK-483 - 1940 Golden Gate International Exposition, The Story of Petroleum "So-Called Dollar"

Also known as the 1940 Petroleum Dollar. There are two types of text found on the reverse of this medal (although the words are identical), and based on some pictures I've seen, I believe this one is a Type II. I have seen other NGC graded medals where the type has been designated on the label, but not this one. I'd love to hear from anyone who knows absolutely how to tell which type this medal is. Another version of this medal was struck in 1939 and is identified as HK-484. The obverse on HK-484 is slightly different, but the reverse contains exactly the same text. I find it interesting that the higher HK number was assigned to the earlier medal. This always trips me up when describing these medals.

See http://www.so-calleddollars.com/Events/Golden_Gate_Exposition.html for a more complete description.

As of this revision, PCGS has graded none of these medals, and NGC has graded ten at MS66 with three finer at MS67.

Date acquired: 7/23/2013 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 1/16/2016
View Coin   United States SC$1 1939 CA HK-484 PETROLEUM DOLLAR GOLDEN GATE EXPOSITION GOLDEN GATE EXPOSITION NGC MS 64 HK-484 - 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition - Petroleum Exhibit "So-Called Dollar"

Also known as the 1939 Petroleum Dollar. Another version of this medal was struck in 1940 and is identified as HK-483. The obverse on HK-483 is more modern looking, but the reverse contains exactly the same text. I find it interesting that the higher HK number was assigned to the earlier medal. This always trips me up when describing these medals.

See http://www.so-calleddollars.com/Events/Golden_Gate_Exposition.html for a description.

Date acquired: 7/23/2013 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 1/16/2016
View Coin   United States SC$1 1939 CA HK-484 PETROLEUM DOLLAR GOLDEN GATE EXPOSITION NGC MS 66 HK-484 - 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition - Petroleum Exhibit "So-Called Dollar" (Specifically labeled as "Type 2"

Also known as the 1939 Petroleum Dollar. Another version of this medal was struck in 1940 and is identified as HK-483. The obverse on HK-483 is more modern looking, but the reverse contains exactly the same text. I find it interesting that the higher HK number was assigned to the earlier medal. This always trips me up when describing these medals.

See http://www.so-calleddollars.com/Events/Golden_Gate_Exposition.html for a description.

Date acquired: 3/27/2015 (Already graded by NGC)

Rev. 3/27/2015

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