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USA/Philippines Type Set (Expanded Edition)

Category:  Series Sets
Owner:  JAA
Last Modified:  1/13/2018
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Slot:
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY COMMONWEALTH COMMEMORATIVE
Item Description: SILVER PESO 1936 M USA-PHIL ROOSEVELT-QUEZON KM-177
Grade: NGC MS 66
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
.800 Silver, 20.0 Grams, ASW .5144 oz, 35 mm.

In 1936 the Manila Mint produced a set of three coins to commemorate the founding of the Commonwealth Of The Philippines on November 15,1935. The set consisted of a Fifty Centavos, and two One Peso Coins. The coins were designed by Ambrosio Morales, a Professor of Fine Arts at the University of the Philippines. The two commemorative Pesos were struck in .800 fineness silver. The Fifty Centavos was struck in .750 fineness silver. The three coin set had a face value of 2.5 Pesos, equal to $1.25 in U.S. Dollars, and sold for $3.13.

The obverse design of the Roosevelt-Quezon Peso features portraits of the first Philippine President Manuel L. Quezon and U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt. This was the second appearance of a living U.S. President on a coin issued by the United States. The other was on the U.S. Sesquicentennial commemorative Half Dollar issued in 1926 on which living President Calvin Coolidge was portrayed.

The reverse design of the Roosevelt-Quezon Peso depicts the official seal of "The Commonwealth of the Philippines".
Design elements of the Commonwealth Reverse incorporate the rich history of the Philippines. The eagle perched atop the shield, of course, represents the United States. The shield used was an adaptation of a design used for the official seal of The Government of the Philippine Islands which appeared on Philippine paper money starting in 1905 (Allen 2008). The three stars at the top of the shield represent the three main geographical regions of the Philippines: Luzon, Mindanao, and the Visayas. The lettering on the Scroll beneath the shield reads Commonwealth of the Philippines. The oval in the center of the shield depicts a modification of the Coat of Arms of the City of Manila which dates to 1596.

On the 20th of March, 1596 King Philip The II bestowed upon the ensigne y siempre leal City of Manila a Coat of Arms such as is possessed by other cities of the Indies. It shall consist of a shield which shall have in its upper part a golden castle on a red field closed by blue doors and windows and which shall be surmounted by a crown and on the lower half on a blue field, a half lion and half dolphin of silver armed and langued gules (red nails and tongue). The said lion shall hold in his paws a sword with guards and hilt. (Royal Edict of March 20, 1596 as quoted in Perez 1946 and 1975)

If you look at the attached picture, you can clearly see the castle surmounted by a crown and the half lion-half dolphin holding a sword with guards and hilt in his paws.

The mintage of the 1936M Roosevelt-Quezon Peso was 10,000 coins, however, the actual number of existing coins is far less as many of these coins were crated and thrown into Manila Bay, near Corregidor, in 1942 to avoid seizure by the invading forces of Japan.

The NGC population of the Roosevelt-Quezon Peso in MS66 is 26 coins with only 8 specimens graded higher. The Combined NGC/PCGS population is 64/10 (12/01/2013). This NGC MS66 specimen is a fully struck, untoned, fully brilliant SUPERB GEM.

References:
U.S./Philippine Coins, 6th Edition, 2008, by Lyman L. Allen
The Copper Coinage of the Philippines by Dr. Gilbert S. Perez, first published in the Coin Collectors Journal, Sept-October 1946 and reprinted in Philippine Numismatic Monographs Number 19 in 1975.
Slot: Fifty Centavos 1936 Murphy-Quezon
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY COMMONWEALTH COMMEMORATIVE
Item Description: SILVER 50C 1936 M USA-PHIL MURPHY-QUEZON KM-176
Grade: NGC MS 65
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 20,000 *
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 10.0000g (154.32 grains)
ASW: 0.2411oz
Diameter: 27.5 mm
Mint Mark: M

In 1936 the Manila Mint produced a set of three coins to commemorate the founding of the Commonwealth Of The Philippines on November 15,1935. The set consisted of a Fifty Centavos, and two One Peso Coins. The coins were designed by Ambrosio Morales, a Professor of Fine Arts at the University of the Philippines. The two commemorative Pesos were struck in .800 fineness silver. The Fifty Centavos was struck in .750 fineness silver. The three coin set had a face value of 2.5 Pesos, equal to $1.25 in U.S. Dollars, and sold for $3.13.

The obverse design of the Murphy-Quezon Fifty Centavos features portraits of the first Philippine President Manuel L. Quezon and U.S. Governor General Frank Murphy. The reverse design depicts the official seal of "The Commonwealth of the Philippines".

* The actual number of existing Murphy-Quezon Fifty Centavos is far less than the mintage figures would suggest as many of these coins were crated and thrown into Manila Bay, near Corregidor, in 1942 to avoid seizure by the invading forces of Japan.

The NGC population for this coin in MS 65 is thirty-nine specimens with only five coins graded higher. The combined NGC/PCGS certified population for the 1936 Murphy-Quezon Fifty Centavos in MS65 is sixty-seven coins with only seven coins graded higher (12/01/2013). This NGC MS-65 specimen is a fully struck, silver toned GEM.
Slot: Half Centavo 1903-1908
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: BRONZE 1/2C 1908 USA-PHIL KM-162
Grade: PCGS PF 67 RB
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mint: Philadelphia
Mint Mark: None
Mintage: 500
Designer: Melicio Figueroa
Engraver: Charles Barber
Composition: Bronze
Weight: 2.6000g
Diameter: 17.5mm
Edge: Plain

This beautiful rainbow toned SUPERB GEM is from the "Just Having Fun Collection". The 1908 Half Centavo is a PROOF ONLY ISSUE with a mintage of only 500. The Combined NGC/PCGS population for this rare date in PF67 is only three specimens with none graded finer.

The Half Centavo was designed by Melicio Figueroa. The obverse design shows a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

Business strikes of the Half Centavo coin were struck at the Philadelphia Mint in 1903 (12,084,000) and 1904 (5,654,000). The Half Centavo coin was poorly accepted by the public and no further business strikes of this denomination were made after 1904. For lack of use over 7,500,000 Half Centavos were withdrawn from circulation. Most of these were sent back to the United States where they were melted and then re-coined into One Centavo pieces in 1908. That leaves a little less than 60% of the origional total mintage still available to collectors today.

A limited number of Proof Half Centavos were produced at the Philadelphia mint from 1903 through 1906 and again in 1908. The mintage figures for proof Half Centavos is as follows:1903 (2,558), 1904 (1,355), 1905 (471), 1906 (500), and 1908 (500). The 1905, 1906, and 1908 Half Centavos were PROOF ONLY ISSUES.

NGC Population: 0/0 (8/14/2020)
PCGS Population: 3/0 (8/14/2020)
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 3/0 (8/14/2020)

Slot: Centavo 1903-1936 Territorial Reverse
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: BRONZE 1C 1905 USA-PHIL KM-163
Grade: NGC PF 67 RB
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Specifications: Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc and tin), 80 Grains (4.7000g), 24mm.
Mintage: 471
NGC Population in PF67: 1 PF67RB (None graded higher)
PCGS Population in PR67: 1 PR67RD (None graded higher)

The One Centavo was designed by Melicio Figueroa. The obverse design shows a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield. Business strikes using Figueroa's obverse and reverse designs were made at the Philadelphia Mint from 1903 through 1905, the San Francisco Mint from 1908 through 1920 and the Manila Mint from 1920 through 1936. The Manila mint was the only United States branch mint ever established outside the continental United States. A limited number of proof One Centavos were produced at the Philadelphia mint from 1903 through 1906 and again in 1908.

The 1905 Proof One Centavo had a mintage of only 471, which is the lowest mintage in the Proof One Centavo series. This beautiful SUPERB GEM PROOF is literally in a class by itself as it is the only 1905 Proof One Centavo that NGC has graded in this lofty grade and no specimens have been graded higher. This specimen is fully reflective and 75% red with attractive green, pink, and sky blue toning.
Slot: Centavo 1937-1941 Commonwealth Reverse
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY COMMONWEALTH REVERSE
Item Description: BRONZE 1C 1937 M USA-PHIL KM-179
Grade: NGC MS 65 RD
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Specifications: (1937 through 1941) Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc and tin), 80 Grains, 24 mm; (1944) Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc), 80 Grains, 24 mm.

The One Centavos of 1937 through 1944 continue the same obverse design common to all Phillipine base medal coins from 1903 through 1936. In 1937 the reverse design of all US/Philippine coins were changed to reflect the new status for the Philippines as a Commonwealth of the United States. A smaller eagle was used, now perched atop a smaller shield with a banner below it inscribed "Commonwealth of the Philippines." The shield used was an adaptation of a design used for the official seal of "The Government of the Philippine Islands" which appeared on Philippine paper money starting in 1905.

The One Centavos of 1937 through 1941 were minted at the Manila Mint. During the 1942 through 1944 Japanese occupation of the Philippines nearly all coins disappeared from circulation, and most daily commerce was conducted with low denomination paper currency printed by Guerrilla military units, local municipalities, or Military and Civilian Currency Boards authorized by General MacArthur or the Commonwealth government-in-exile under President Quezon.

When American forces liberated the Philippines in 1944 - 1945 they brought with them Fifty Eight Million 1944 One Centavo coins minted at the San Francisco Mint.

The 1937 One Centavo had a mintage of 15,790,000. The NGC population for the 1937 M One Centavo in MS65 Red is 8 coins with only 3 specimens graded higher. The combined NGC/PCGS certified population of the 1937 M One Centavo in MS65 Red is 14 coins with 9 specimens graded higher (12/01/2013). This specimen is a brilliant, well struck GEM.
Slot: Centavo 1944 Wartime Alloy
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: BRASS (COPPER-ZINC) 1C 1944 S USA-PHIL Allen 3.06b KM-179
Grade: PCGS MS 67 RD
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
The 1944 One Centavo uses the same obverse and reverse designs as the pre-war One Centavo but has a different wartime composition.

The pre-war One Centavo was a bronze alloy of 95% copper, and 5% zinc and tin. Both copper and tin are important strategic materials during wartime. In order to conserve tin the wartime composition of the One Centavo was changed to a brass alloy of 95% copper and 5% zinc. This is the same alloy the mint used for the production of U.S. wartime pennies dated 1944-1946. The mint produced this alloy by combining ingots of pure copper with salvaged 70% copper shell casings.

During the 1942 through 1944 Japanese occupation of the Philippines, nearly all coins disappeared from circulation. In the occupied areas the Japanese collected all of the coins, melted them down and shipped them back to Japan. The few pre-war coins that escaped the melting pots were hoarded and hid away until after the war. Most daily commerce was conducted with low denomination paper currency (Emergency or Guerilla Currency) printed by Guerrilla military units, local municipalities, or Military and Civilian Currency Boards authorized by General MacArthur or the Commonwealth government-in-exile under President Quezon.

During the Japanese occupation there was a very active resistance movement in the Philippines, and allied inteligence was very much aware, of the economic situation in the islands, and the need to bring new coins and currency with them when they liberated the Philippines.

In preparation for General MacArthurs return to the Philippines, the Treasury Department ordered the San Francisco Mints to strike millions of One Centavo coins. When American forces liberated the Philippines in 1944 - 1945 they brought with them Fifty Eight Million 1944-S One Centavo coins.

The PCGS population for the 1944-S One Centavo in MS67 Red is six coins with none graded higher. The combined PCGS/NGC certified population for this coin in MS67 Red is only 12 coins with none graded higher.

This FULL RED SUPERB GEM is a die variety with the base of the last 4 missing at the left side (Allen number 3.06b). The 2012 edition of the Allen guide book lists the highest certified grade for this die variety at MS66 making this coin unique in MS67 RED.
Slot: Five Centavos 1903-1928 Territorial Reverse
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY TERRITORIAL REVERSE
Item Description: COPPER-NICKEL 5C 1908 USA-PHIL KM-164
Grade: NGC PF 66
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Copper-Nickel, 77.16 Grains, 20.5 mm. The 1903 through 1928 Five Centavos have the same obverse and reverse design as the Half Centavo and One Centavo coins. Business strikes were made at the Philadelphia Mint in 1903 and 1904, the San Francisco Mint from 1916 through 1919, and the Manila Mint from 1920 through 1928. A limited number of proof Five Centavos coins were made at the Philadelphia Mint from 1903 through 1908.

The 1908 Proof Five Centavos is a PROOF ONLY ISSUE with a mintage of 500 coins. The NGC population for this coin in PF66 is seven coins with only one specimen graded higher. The combined (NGC, PCGS, ANACS) certified population for the 1908 Five Centavos in PF66 is Twenty-nine coins with only two specimens graded higher. This PF66 Five Centavos is a beautifully toned SUPERB GEM.
Slot: Five Centavos 1930-1935 Reduced Size and Weight
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY REDUCED SIZE & WEIGHT
Item Description: COPPER-NICKEL 5C 1932 M USA-PHIL KM-175
Grade: PCGS MS 65
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 3,956,000
Composition: Copper-Nickel
Weight: 4.7500g (75.16 grains)
Diameter: 19mm
Mint Mark: M

The obverse and reverse designs of the 1930 through 1935 (reduced size and weight) Five Centavos is the same as the 1903 through 1928 Five Centavos.

In 1906 a rise in the price of silver forced the reduction of the fineness and weight for all Philippine silver issues. The reduced size Twenty Centavos coins of 1907 - 1929 had a diameter of 21mm and were easily confused with the 21.3 mm Five Centavos of 1903 through 1928. This confusion resulted in a mismatching of dies for these two denominations in 1918 and again in 1928. A solution was found by reducing the diameter of the Five Centavos coin to 19 mm beginning in 1930. The reduced size and weight Five Centavos were made at the Manila Mint from 1930 through 1932, and again in 1934 and 1935.

In war time nickel and copper are strategic materials critical to a nations war effort. During the WWII Japanese occupation of the Philippines (1942 -1945) many pre-war Five Centavos were collected melted down and sent back to Japan.

The combined NGC/PCGS certified population for the 1932-M Five Centavos in MS65 is 16 specimens with none graded higher (12/01/2013).
Slot: Five Centavos 1937-1941 Commonwealth Reverse
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY COMMONWEALTH REVERSE
Item Description: COPPER-NICKEL 5C 1937 M USA-PHIL KM-180
Grade: PCGS MS 65
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
The Five Centavos of 1937 through 1945 continued the same obverse design used on the 1903 through 1935 Five Centavos. The reverse used the Commonwealth Arms design which was common to the 1936 commemoratives and all Philippine coins from 1937 through 1945.

Five Centavos were made at the Manila Mint in 1937, 1938 and 1941; at the Philadelphia Mint in 1944; and the San Francisco Mint in 1944 and 1945. Pre-war coins struck at the Manila Mint have the same size (19 mm) and Copper-Nickel composition as the 1930 through 1935 Five Centavos but a slightly increased weight (75.16 Grains, 4.8000 Grams). During World War ll copper and nickel were strategic metals needed for the war effort. This resulted in the adoption of a copper-nickel-zink alloy for the 1944 and 1945 Five Centavos. The new alloy was 65% copper, 23% zink, and 12% nickel. The 1944 and 1945 Five Centavos had a weight of 4.92 Grams.

The 1937 M Five Centavos had a mintage of 2,494,000. The NGC population for this coin in MS65 is five coins with only three specimens graded higher. The combined NGC/PCGS certified population for the 1937 M Five Centavos in MS65 is 13 coins with 7 specimens graded higher.

This specimen has some very unusual strike characteristics:

The obverse has a lose of detail on the right side of the volcano, and the left side of the pedestal which is typical 1937-1941 Five Centavos. There is also three prominent Laminations (Mint Errors) on the rim running from 12 oclock to 5 oclock. The laminations are highly raised with boldly struck dentils. When viewed in person the laminations are also far more prominent and interesting than in the pictures.

The reverse has sharply struck center details but has a great lack of rim sharpness. The Castle with Crown, and Half Lion/Half Dolphin in the central devise is the sharpest I have ever seen on a pre-war Commonwealth Five Centavos and all of the lettering on the scroll is readable. In contrast the inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is extremely weakly struck particularily the top parts of the lettering closest to the rim and the M mint mark is barely visible.

Although it does not show up in the photos this coin has exceptional eye appeal. In fact this specimen has the best eye appeal of any business strike Five Centavos that I have ever seen. The fields are Proof Like with iridescent rainbow toning. When you look at this coin face on it appears to be Gold Toned. However when you turn the coin to view it from different angles the colors change like in a hologram reveling beautiful shades of gold, blue, and red.
Slot: Five Centavos 1944-1945 Wartime Alloy
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: COPPER-ZINC-NICKEL 5C 1944 S USA-PHIL KM-180a
Grade: PCGS MS 67
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mint: San Francisco
Mint Mark: S
Obverse Designed: Melicio Figueroa
Mintage: 14,040,000
Composition: Copper (65%) - Zinc (23%) - Nickel (12%)
Weight: 4.9200g
Diameter: 19mm
Edge: Plain

The 1944 and 1945 Five Centavos use the same obverse and reverse designs as the pre-war Five Centavos but have a different Wartime composition.

The pre-war Five Centavos had a composition of Copper (75%) and Nickel (25%). Both Copper and Nickel are important strategic materials during wartime. Copper is needed for the production of shell casings and Nickel is an essential ingredient in the manufacture of armor plating for ships, tanks, etc. In order to conserve Copper and Nickel the wartime alloy of the Five Centavos was changed to Copper (65%), Zinc (23%), and Nickel (12%).

During the 1942 through 1944 Japanese occupation of the Philippines nearly all coins disappeared from circulation. In the occupied areas the Japanese collected all of the coins melted them down and shipped them back to Japan. The few pre-war coins that escaped the melting pots were horded and hid away until after the war. Most daily commerce was conducted with low denomination paper currency (Emergency or Guerilla Currency) printed by Guerrilla military units, local municipalities, or Military and Civilian Currency Boards authorized by General MacArthur or the Commonwealth government-in-exile under President Quezon.

During the Japanese occupation there was a very active resistance movement in the Philippines and allied inteligence was very much aware, of the economic situation in the islands, and the need to bring new coins and currency with them when they liberated the Philippines.

In preparation for General MacArthur's return to the Philippines the Treasury Department ordered the Philadelphia, and San Francisco Mints to strike millions of Five Centavos coins. The Philadelphia Mint struck 21,198,000 Five Centavos dated 1944. There is no Mint Mark on the coins struck at Philadelphia. The San Francisco Mint Struck 14,040,000 Five Centavos dated 1944 and 72,796,000 dated 1945. Coins struck at San Francisco have a S Mint Mark.

When American forces liberated the Philippines in 1944 - 1945 they brought with them the Wartime Alloy Victory Coins produced in the continental United States.

PCGS Population: 7/0
NGC Population: 0/0
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 7/0

The 1944 and 1945 Five Centavos use the same obverse and reverse designs as the pre-war Five Centavos but have a different Wartime composition.

The pre-war Five Centavos had a composition of Copper (75%) and Nickel (25%). Both Copper and Nickel are important strategic materials during wartime. Copper is needed for the production of shell casings and Nickel is an essential ingredient in the manufacture of armor plating for ships, tanks, etc. In order to conserve Copper and Nickel the wartime alloy of the Five Centavos was changed to Copper (65%), Zinc (23%), and Nickel (12%).

During the 1942 through 1944 Japanese occupation of the Philippines nearly all coins disappeared from circulation. In the occupied areas the Japanese collected all of the coins melted them down and shipped them back to Japan. The few pre-war coins that escaped the melting pots were horded and hid away until after the war. Most daily commerce was conducted with low denomination paper currency (Emergency or Guerilla Currency) printed by Guerrilla military units, local municipalities, or Military and Civilian Currency Boards authorized by General MacArthur or the Commonwealth government-in-exile under President Quezon.

During the Japanese occupation there was a very active resistance movement in the Philippines and allied inteligence was very much aware, of the economic situation in the islands, and the need to bring new coins and currency with them when they liberated the Philippines.

In preparation for General MacArthur's return to the Philippines the Treasury Department ordered the Philadelphia, and San Francisco Mints to strike millions of Five Centavos coins. The Philadelphia Mint struck 21,198,000 Five Centavos dated 1944. There is no Mint Mark on the coins struck at Philadelphia. The San Francisco Mint Struck 14,040,000 Five Centavos dated 1944 and 72,796,000 dated 1945. Coins struck at San Francisco have a S Mint Mark.

When American forces liberated the Philippines in 1944 - 1945 they brought with them the Wartime Alloy Victory Coins produced in the continental United States.
Slot: Ten Centavos 1903-1906 Territorial Reverse
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: SILVER 10C 1906 USA-PHIL EX. DR. GREG PINEDA KM-165
Grade: PCGS PF 66
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
This beautiful specimen from the Dr. Greg Pineda Collection is evenly and beautifully blue toned on the obverse, and has more brilliant but lovely shades of golden toning on the reverse. An exquisite offering of a rare coin.

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino woman standing to the right in a flowing dress while striking an anvil with a hammer held in her right hand, the left hand is raised and holding an olive branch. In the background is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield. At a weight of 2.69 Grams of .900 Silver the Large (17.5 mm) Ten Centavos, minted from 1903 through 1906 had a silver content equal to the U.S. Barber Dime. With an official exchange rate of two Philippine Pesos to one U.S. dollar it was not long before the value of the silver content in the Large Ten Centavos exceeded its face value and many were melted during the great silver melts of the period. Lyman Allen estimates that less than 20% of all 1903-1906 silver coinages exist today in any grade.

Business strikes of the Large Ten Centavos were coined at the Philadelphia Mint in 1903 and 1904 and the San Francisco Mint in 1903 and 1904. Proofs of the Large Ten Centavos were made in very limited quantities at the Philadelphia Mint from 1903 through 1906.

Proof sets were not sold in any sort of protective packaging or cases but were contained in plain paper envelopes and each coin was wrapped individually in thin tissue paper. This method of packaging has contributed to the micro thin hairline scratches seen on most proof coins as well as the heavy toning often seen. GEM proof coins are very scarce.

The 1906 Ten Centavos is a PROOF ONLY ISSUE with a mintage of only 500 coins. The combined NGC/PCGS Population is 17/14 (NGC Population 5/4, PCGS Population 12/10)
Slot: Ten Centavos 1907-1935 Reduced Size and Weight
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY REDUCED SIZE & WEIGHT
Item Description: SILVER 10C 1907 USA-PHIL KM-169
Grade: NGC MS 66
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
.750 Silver, 2.0 Grams, ASW .04820 oz, 16.5 mm.

The obverse and reverse designs of the 1907 through 1921 Ten Centavos is the same as the 1903 through 1906 Ten Centavos. In 1907 a rise in the price of silver forced the reduction of the fineness and weight for all Philippine silver issues. In 1907 the silver Ten Centavos was reduced in fineness from .900 silver, 2.69 Grams to .750 silver, 2.0 Grams, and the diameter was reduced from 17.5 mm to 16.5 mm.

Business strikes of the reduced size and weight Ten Centavos were struck at the Philadelphia Mint in 1907, the San Francisco Mint from 1907 through 1919, and the Manila Mint from 1920 through 1935. Proof reduced size and weight Ten Centavos were struck at the Philadelphia Mint in 1908.

1907 was the FIRST YEAR OF ISSUE for the Reduced Size & Weight Ten Centavos and the only year that business strikes of this type were made at the Philadelphia mint. The mintage of 1907 (P) Ten Centavos was 1,501,000.

The NGC population for this coin in MS66 is three coins with none graded higher. The combined (NGC, PCGS, ANACS) certified population for the 1907 Ten Centavos in MS66 is 14 coins with only three specimens graded higher. This specimen is a brilliant fully struck Superb GEM.
Slot: Ten Centavos 1937-1945 Commonwealth Reverse
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY COMMONWEALTH REVERSE
Item Description: SILVER 10C 1941 M USA-PHIL KM-181
Grade: NGC MS 66
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 2,500,000
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 2.0000g (30.86 grains)
ASW: 0.0482oz
Diameter: 16.7 mm
Edge: Reeded
Mint Mark: M

The Ten Centavos of 1937 through 1941 continued the same obverse design that was used on the 1907 - 1935 Ten Centavos and was struck to the same specifications. The reverse used the Commonwealth Arms design which was common to to the 1936 commemoratives and all Philippine coins from 1937 through 1945.

In 1937 the reverse design of all US/Philippine coins were changed to reflect the new status for the Philippines as a Commonwealth of the United States. A smaller eagle was used, now perched atop a smaller shield with a banner below it inscribed "Commonwealth of the Philippines." The shield used was an adaptation of a design used for the official seal of "The Government of the Philippine Islands" which appeared on Philippine paper money starting in 1905.

The 1941 M Ten Centavos has a great deal of historical signifiance in that this coin was born on the eve of World War ll and was certainly among the last coins produced at the Manila Mint before the Japanese invaded the Philippines.

The NGC population for the 1941 M Ten Centavos in MS66 is twelve coins with only four specimens graded higher. The combined NGC/PCGS cerftified population is 23/5 (12/01/2013).

This specimen is a fully struck, brilliant, untoned SUBERB GEM.
Slot: Twenty Centavos 1903-1906 Territorial Reverse
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: SILVER 20C 1906 USA-PHIL KM-166
Grade: NGC PF 66
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 500
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.9000
Weight: 5.3849g
ASW: 0.1558oz
Edge: Reeded

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino woman standing to the right in a flowing dress while striking an anvil with a hammer held in her right hand, the left hand is raised and holding an olive branch. In the background is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

The Large (23 mm) Twenty Centavos minted from 1903 through 1906 had a weight of 5.385 Grams of .900 Silver. With an official exchange rate of two Philippine Pesos to one U.S. dollar it was not long before the value of the silver content in the Large Twenty Centavos exceeded its face value and many were melted during the great silver melts of the period. In 1906 the silver coins held in reserve by the Treasury to back the Philippine paper money then in circulation were exported to the U.S. for re-coinage into the reduced size and weight pieces which followed in 1907. Lyman Allen estimates that less than 20% of all 1903-1906 silver coinages exist today in any grade.

Business strikes were coined at the Philadelphia Mint in 1903 and 1904 and the San Francisco Mint from 1903 through 1905. Proofs of the Large Twenty Centavos were made in very limited quantities at the Philadelphia Mint from 1903 through 1906. Proof sets were not sold in any sort of protective packaging or cases but were contained in plain paper envelopes and each coin was wrapped individually in thin tissue paper. This method of packaging has contributed to the micro thin hairline scratches seen on most proof coins as well as the heavy toning often seen. GEM proof specimens are very scarce.

The 1906 Twenty Centavos is a PROOF ONLY ISSUE with a mintage of only 500 specimens. This Superb Gem has mirror fields with gray and iridescent blue toning.

NGC Population: 5/8
PCGS Population: 7/12
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 12/20
Slot: Twenty Centavos 1907-1929 Reduced Size and Weight
Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY REDUCED SIZE & WEIGHT
Item Description: SILVER 20C 1908 USA-PHIL KM-170
Grade: NGC PF 65
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
.750 Silver, 4.0 Grams, 20 mm.

The obverse and reverse designs of the 1907 through 1929 Twenty Centavos are the same as the 1903 through 1906 Twenty Centavos.

In 1907 a rise in the price of silver forced the reduction of the fineness and weight for all Philippine silver issues. The silver Twenty Centavos was reduced in fineness from .900 silver, 5.385 Grams to .750 silver, 4.0 Grams, and the diameter was reduced from 23 mm to 20 mm. Business strikes of the reduced size and weight Twenty Centavos were struck at the Philadelphia Mint in 1907, the San Francisco Mint from 1907 through 1919, and the Manila Mint from 1920 through 1929. Proof reduced size and weight Twenty Centavos were struck at the Philadelphia Mint in 1908.

The 1908 Twenty Centavos is a PROOF ONLY ISSUE with a mintage of 500 coins. The NGC population of the 1908 Twenty Centavos in PF65 is eight coins with nine specimens graded higher. The combined (NGC, PCGS, ANACS) certified population for this coin is 22/18.
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