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The United States Manila Mint, Complete

Owner:  JAA
Last Modified:  12/1/2021
  
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Left: reverse of the 1890 U.S. Assay Commission Medal. Right: reverse of the 1920 Manila Mint Opening Commemorative Medal.

Mintage 2,200 Silver (HK-449), 3,700 Bronze (HK-450), and between 5 and 15 Gold (HK-1031). The surviving number of Wilson Dollars particularly in mint state is much less as many specimens were lost during WWII. When Japan invaded the Philippines in 1942 the U.S. government dumped 16 million Pesos in silver coins into Manila Bay to prevent it's seizure by the Japanese. Many Silver and Bronze Wilson Dollars were included in this dumping. Although many of these coins and medals were salvaged after the war the majority are heavily corroded from their long immersion in salt water.

All Wilson Dollars are scarce particularily in true Mint State. According to NGC and PCGS online population reports (3/10/2014) NGC and PCGS combined have only certified 120 Silver and 22 Bronze Wilson Dollars in MS60 and above.

NGC Population: 32/57
PCGS Population:4/17


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Slot: Photos of the Manila Mint, Circa 1920
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: Photos of the Manila Mint circa 1920 5C 1935 M USA-PHIL
Grade: NGC MS 63
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
The United States Manila Mint circa 1920
Slot: 1920 - Manila Mint Opening Medal - Bronze (Mintage: 3,700)
Origin/Country: United States PHILIPPINES
Design Description: SO-CALLED DOLLARS - HIBLER & KAPPEN
Item Description: BRONZE SC$1 1920 HK-450 WILSON DOLLAR MANILA MINT OPENING EX. DR. GREGORY PINEDA
Grade: NGC UNC DETAILS
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
So-Called Dollar, 1920 (M) HK-450 Wilson Dollar. Bronze 38.2mm, medal commemorating the "Opening of the Manila Mint".

The Bronze medal commemorating the "Opening of the Manila Mint" was struck at the U.S. Manila Mint in mid-July 1920. Speaker Osmena of the Filipino House of Representatives struck off the first medal during the July 15, 1920 opening day ceremony and 2000 specimens were struck on the first day. Up to 3700 Bronze Medals were produced and sold for fifty cents at the time of issue.

Many of the Bronze medals went unsold for years and were still in the Philippine Treasury at the outbreak of WWII. When Japan invaded the Philippines the Commonwealth government moved the contents of the Philippine Treasury from Manila to the island fortress of Corregidor. Prior to the fall of Corregidor 16 million Pesos in silver coins and many Silver and Bronze Wilson Dollars were dumped into Manila Bay to prevent there seizure by the Japanese. Although many of these coins and medals were salvaged after the war the majority are heavily corroded from their long immersion in salt water.

Bronze Wilson Dollars in a high state of preservation are much scarcer than the Silver medals. NGC and PCGS combined have only certified 22 Bronze Wilson dollars in MS60 and above. Unfortunately population reports for details graded coins are not available.

This attractive specimen from the Dr. Gregory Pineda Philippine Collection is 90% red with a touch of iridescent blue toning.

Slot: 1920 - Manila Mint Opening Medal - Silver (Mintage: 2,200)
Origin/Country: United States PHILIPPINES
Design Description: SO-CALLED DOLLARS - HIBLER & KAPPEN
Item Description: SILVER SC$1 1920 HK-449 WILSON DOLLAR MANILA MINT OPENING MANILA MINT OPENING
Grade: NGC MS 62
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
So-Called Dollar, 1920 (M) HK-449 Wilson Dollar. Silver 38.2mm, 440 grains, medal commemorating the opening of the Manila Mint.

Dies for the " Wilson Dollar" were cut by by George Morgan, who was the Mint's Chief Engraver in 1920, and who was also responsible for the U.S. Morgan Silver Dollar.

The obverse presents a well executed portrait of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson.

The reverse shows a representation of "Juno Moneta" (the goddess of money and minting) kneeling and watching over a nude youth who is pouring planchets (coin blanks) into a coining press. The design used is a modification of a much earlier Morgan design that was used on several of the U.S. Assay Commissions Annual Medals in the 1880s and 1890s.

Slot: 1920 - 1 Centavo (Mintage: 3,552,259)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: BRONZE 1C 1920 USA-PHIL KM-163
Grade: PCGS MS 64 RD
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 3,552,000
PCGS Population: 3/1 (PCGS Condition Census)
NGC Population 0/0.
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 3/1
Slot: 1920 - 5 Centavos (Mintage: 1,421,078)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: COPPER-NICKEL 5C 1920 USA-PHIL KM-164
Grade: PCGS MS 63
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 1,421,000
Composition: Copper-Nickel (75% Copper, 25% Nickel)
Weight: 5.2500 grams (77.16 Grains)
Diameter: 21.3 mm
Mint Mark: None

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of Five Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time Five Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines.

The Five Centavos struck at the Manila Mint in 1920 and 1921 used the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1903 - 1919 Five Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M) and 1921(M) Five Centavos is that they have no Mint Mark.

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

PCGS Population 10/5
NGC Population 2/1
Combined NGC/PCGS Population 12/6 (12/01/2013)
Slot: 1920 - 10 Centavos (Mintage: 520,000)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: SILVER 10C 1920 USA-PHIL KM-169
Grade: PCGS MS 64
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mint: Manila
Mint Mark: None
Mintage: 520,000
Designer: Melicio Figueroa
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 2.0000g
ASW: 0.0482oz
Melt Value: $0.82 (1/17/2018)
Diameter: 16.5mm
Edge: Reeded

An exceptionally uniform looking example that exhibits full cartwheel luster that is as beautiful as the look

NGC Population: 6/0 (1/17/2018)
PCGS Population: 22/6 (1/17/2018)
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 28/6 (1/17/2018)
Slot: 1920 - 20 Centavos (Mintage: 1,045,415)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: SILVER 20C 1920 USA-PHIL KM-170
Grade: NGC MS 64
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 1,046,000
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 4.0000g (61.72 grains)
ASW: 0.0964oz
Diameter: 21 mm
Edge: Reeded
Mint Mark: None

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of Twenty Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time Twenty Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines. The Twenty Centavos struck at the Manila Mint in 1920 and 1921 used the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1907 - 1919 Twenty Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M) and 1921(M) Twenty Centavos is that they have no Mint Mark.

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino woman standing to the right in a flowing dress while striking an anvil with a hammer held in her right hand, the left hand is raised and holding an olive branch. In the background is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

NGC Population 2/1
PCGS Population: 4/2
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 6/3

This condition census GEMBU specimen has nice strike and full luster, as it came from the mint!
Slot: 1920 - 50 Centavos (Mintage: 420,000)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: SILVER 50C 1920 USA-PHIL KM-171
Grade: NGC MS 64
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 420,000
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 10.0000g (154.32 grains)
ASW: 0.2411oz
Diameter: 27.5 mm
Edge: Reeded
Mint Mark: None

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of Fifty Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time Fifty Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines. The Fifty Centavos struck at the Manila Mint in 1920 and 1921 used the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1907 - 1919 Fifty Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M) and 1921(M) Fifty Centavos was that they had no Mint Mark.

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino woman standing to the right in a flowing dress while striking an anvil with a hammer held in her right hand, the left hand is raised and holding an olive branch. In the background is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

The NGC population for the 1920 Fifty Centavos in MS64 is 3 coins with none graded higher. The combined NGC/PCGS population is 13/1 (12/01/2013).

This attractive NGC Top Pop example of the 1920 Fifty Centavos is from the "Just Having Fun Collection".
Slot: 1920 - Culion Leper Colony - 10 Centavos (Mintage: 20,000)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: ALUMINUM 10C 1920 USA-PHIL CULION LEPER COLONY KM-9
Grade: NGC XF Details
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
In 1906 the Bureau of Health for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines established a colony for leper patients on the small island of Culion in the China Sea. For health reasons, the decision was made that the leper colony should have a separate coinage of its own which would not circulate in the rest of the Philippines.

One of the fascinating features of the monetary system in the leper colony was the strict regulations which separated the circulation of government coinage and the special "Leper Coins". In the colony proper "Leper Money" was the only legal medium of exchange. Government coinage was not allowed within the colony and non-lepers that did business in the colony had to exchange their "Government Money" for "Leper Money" before they entered the colony. When they exited the colony they exchanged their "Leper Money" for "Government Money". In this way "Leper Money" only circulated within the colony. The police strictly enforced these regulations and violators were subject to a fine of not more than Fifteen Pesos, imprisonment of up to one month or both.

The First Issue of Culion Leper coins was struck by the firm of Frank and Company, Manila in 1913. In 1920 the newly opened U.S. Manila Mint took over production of Culion Leper Colony coinage. The 1920 Culion Leper Colony issue consisted of Ten Centavos, Twenty Centavos, and One Peso coins, all of which were struck in aluminum.

The obverse design of the 1920 Cullion Leper Colony "10 Centavos" consists of a caduceus, the words "BUREAU OF HEALTH" and the date "1920". The reverse has the denomination "10 CENTAVOS" and the words "CULION LEPER COLONY - PHILIPPINE ISLANDS". The 1920 "10 Centavos" carried no mint mark.

The aluminum Culion Leper Colony coins proved totally unsatisfactory due to rapid deterioration from the climatic conditions in the Philippines and the chemical disinfect (mercuric bichloride) used to disinfect leper colony money. Starting in 1922 all Leper Colony coinage would be struck in copper-nickel.

SPECIFICATIONS:
Mint: U.S. Manila Mint
Mint Mark: None
Mintage: 20,000
Catalog: KM-9
Composition: Aluminum
Diameter: 29.8mm
Slot: 1920 - Culion Leper Colony - 20 Centavos (Mintage: 10,000)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: ALUMINUM 20C 1920 USA-PHIL CULION LEPER COLONY KM-12
Grade: NGC XF 40
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
1920 was the first year that Culion Leper Colony coins were struck at the newly opened U.S. Manila Mint. The 1920 Culion Leper Colony issue consisted of Ten Centavos, Twenty Centavos, and One Peso coins, all of which were struck in aluminum.

The obverse design of the 1920 Cullion Leper Colony "20 Centavos" consists of a caduceus, the words "BUREAU OF HEALTH" and the date "1920". The reverse has the denomination "20 CENTAVOS" and the words "CULION LEPER COLONY - PHILIPPINE ISLANDS". The 1920 "20 Centavos" carried no mint mark.

The aluminum Culion Leper Colony coins proved totally unsatisfactory due to rapid deterioration from the climatic conditions in the Philippines and the chemical disinfect (mercuric bichloride) used to disinfect leper colony money. Starting in 1922 all Leper Colony coinage would be struck in copper-nickel.

Since the Philippine Bureau of Health routinely disinfected all circulating Culion Leper Colony coins in harsh chemicals almost all surviving specimens show moderate to excessive surface hairlines. As a result finding specimens of any date that do not "details grade" can be quite challenging. This is particularly true for the 1913 and 1920 aluminum issues which were more susceptible to damage from the harsh cleaning. To date this specimen is only the second 1920 CLC Twenty Centavos to receive a numerical grade from NGC. At XF40 this specimen is a NGC Top Pop coin and the single finest NGC graded example of this date.

SPECIFICATIONS:
Mint: U.S. Manila Mint
Mint Mark: None
Mintage: 10,000
Composition: Aluminum
Diameter: 32.3 mm

NGC Population: 1/0 (A NGC Top Pop Coin)
Slot: 1920 - Culion Leper Colony - 1 Peso (Mintage: 4,000)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: ALUMINUM PESO 1920 USA-PHIL CULION LEPER COLONY KM-15
Grade: NGC AU 50
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
1920 was the first year that Culion Leper Colony coins were struck at the newly opened U.S. Manila Mint. The 1920 Culion Leper Colony issue consisted of Ten Centavos, Twenty Centavos, and One Peso coins, all of which were struck in aluminum.

The obverse design of the 1920 Cullion Leper Colony "1 Peso" consists of a caduceus, the words "BUREAU OF HEALTH" and the date "1920". The reverse has the denomination "1 PESO" and the words "CULION LEPER COLONY PHILIPPINE ISLANDS". The 1920 "1 Peso" carried no mint mark.

The aluminum Culion Leper Colony coins proved totally unsatisfactory due to rapid deterioration from the climatic conditions in the Philippines and the chemical disinfect (mercuric bichloride) used to disinfect leper colony money. Starting in 1922 all Leper Colony coinage would be struck in copper-nickel.

SPECIFICATIONS:
Mint: U.S. Manila Mint
Mint Mark: None
Mintage: 4,000
Catalog: KM-15
Composition: Aluminum
Diameter: 35.4 mm
Slot: 1921 - 1 Centavo (Mintage: 7,282.673)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: BRONZE 1C 1921 USA-PHIL KM-163
Grade: NGC MS 65 RB
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 7,283,000
Composition: Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc and tin)
Weight: 4.7000g (80 Grains)
Diameter: 24mm
Mint Mark: None

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of One Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time One Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines. The One Centavo coins struck at the Manila Mint from 1920 through 1922 used the same obverse and reverse design as the 1903 - 1919 One Centavo and was struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M), 1921(M), and 1922(M) One Centavo is that they have no Mint Mark.

The One Centavo was designed by Melicio Figueroa. The obverse design shows a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

This beautiful GEM is 70% red, some blue toning and great eye appeal. The 1921 (M) One Centavo is a tough date to find in GEMUNC.

The NGC population for this coin in MS65 RB is only 5 specimens with none graded higher. NGC has graded no red specimens of this date in any grade. Combined NGC/PCGS Population 5/1 (12/01/2013).
Slot: 1921 - 5 Centavos (Mintage: 2,131,529)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: COPPER-NICKEL 5C 1921 USA-PHIL EX. WALDEN PHILIPPINE TERRITORIAL COLLECTION KM-164,
Grade: PCGS MS 64
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 2,132,000
Catalog: KM-164
Composition: Copper-Nickel
Weight: 5.2500g
Diameter: 21.3mm

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of Five Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time Five Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines.

The Five Centavos struck at the Manila Mint in 1920 and 1921 used the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1903 - 1919 Five Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M) and 1921(M) Five Centavos is that they have no Mint Mark.

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

A pleasing coin with an exemplary appearance. This lustrous TOP POP example of the 1921 Five Centavos is pedigreed from the "Walden Philippine Territorial Collection".

NGC Population: 2/0
PCGS Population: 11/0 (PCGS Condition Census)
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 13/0
Slot: 1921 - 10 Centavos (Mintage: 3,863,038)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: SILVER 10C 1921 USA-PHIL KM-169
Grade: NGC MS 65
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 3,863,000
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 2.0000g (30.86 grains)
ASW: 0.0482oz
Diameter: 16.7 mm
Edge: Reeded
Mint Mark: None

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of Ten Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time Ten Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines. The Ten Centavos struck at the Manila Mint in 1920 and 1921 used the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1907 - 1919 Ten Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M) and 1921(M) Ten Centavos is that they have no Mint Mark.

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino woman standing to the right in a flowing dress while striking an anvil with a hammer held in her right hand, the left hand is raised and holding an olive branch. In the background is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

NGC Population: 5/0
PCGS Population: 9/2
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 14/2 (12/01/2013)

This GEMBU specimen has full luster and is a NGC Top Pop coin.
Slot: 1921 - 20 Centavos (Mintage: 1,842,631)
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: SILVER 20C 1921 USA-PHIL KM-170
Grade: PCGS MS 64
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 1,843,000
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 4.0000g
ASW: 0.0964oz
Edge: Reeded

PCGS Population 4/1, NGC Population 6/4, Combined NGC/PCGS Population 10/5
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