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The United States Manila Mint: A Type Set of the Coins & Medals of America's Forgotten Mint

Owner:  JAA
Last Modified:  1/13/2018
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Left: reverse of the 1890 U.S. Assay Commission Medal. Right: reverse of the 1920 Manila Mint Opening Commemorative Medal.

Mintage 2,200 Silver (HK-449), 3,700 Bronze (HK-450), and between 5 and 15 Gold (HK-1031). The surviving number of Wilson Dollars particularly in mint state is much less as many specimens were lost during WWII. When Japan invaded the Philippines in 1942 the U.S. government dumped 16 million Pesos in silver coins into Manila Bay to prevent it's seizure by the Japanese. Many Silver and Bronze Wilson Dollars were included in this dumping. Although many of these coins and medals were salvaged after the war the majority are heavily corroded from their long immersion in salt water.

All Wilson Dollars are scarce particularily in true Mint State. According to NGC and PCGS online population reports (3/10/2014) NGC and PCGS combined have only certified 120 Silver and 22 Bronze Wilson Dollars in MS60 and above.

NGC Population: 32/57
PCGS Population:4/17


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Slot: Photos of the Manila Mint, Circa 1920
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: Photos of the Manila Mint circa 1920 5C 1935 M USA-PHIL
Grade: NGC MS 63
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
The United States Manila Mint circa 1920
Slot: So-Called Wilson Dollar. Silver Medal Commemorating the Operning of the Manila Mint.
Origin/Country: United States PHILIPPINES
Design Description: SO-CALLED DOLLARS - HIBLER & KAPPEN
Item Description: SILVER SC$1 1920 HK-449 WILSON DOLLAR MANILA MINT OPENING MANILA MINT OPENING
Grade: NGC MS 62
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
So-Called Dollar, 1920 (M) HK-449 Wilson Dollar. Silver 38.2mm, 440 grains, medal commemorating the opening of the Manila Mint.

Dies for the " Wilson Dollar" were cut by by George Morgan, who was the Mint's Chief Engraver in 1920, and who was also responsible for the U.S. Morgan Silver Dollar.

The obverse presents a well executed portrait of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson.

The reverse shows a representation of "Juno Moneta" (the goddess of money and minting) kneeling and watching over a nude youth who is pouring planchets (coin blanks) into a coining press. The design used is a modification of a much earlier Morgan design that was used on several of the U.S. Assay Commissions Annual Medals in the 1880s and 1890s.

Slot: Bill Weber Collection pedigreed Wilson Dollar.
Origin/Country: United States PHILIPPINES
Design Description: SO-CALLED DOLLARS - HIBLER & KAPPEN
Item Description: SILVER SC$1 1920 HK-449 WILSON DOLLAR MANILA MINT OPENING BILL WEBER COLLECTION
Grade: NGC MS 62
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
So-Called Dollar, 1920 (M) HK-449 Wilson Dollar. Silver 38.2mm, 440 grains, medal commemorating the opening of the Manila Mint.

The dies for the " Wilson Dollar" were cut by George Morgan, who was the Mint's Chief Engraver in 1920, and who was also responsible for the U.S. Morgan Silver Dollar.

The obverse presents a well executed portrait of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson.

The reverse shows a representation of "Juno Moneta" (the goddess of money and minting) kneeling and watching over a nude youth who is pouring planchets (coin blanks) into a coining press. The design used is a modification of a much earlier Morgan design that was used on several of the U.S. Assay Commissions Annual Medals in the 1880s and 1890s.

Mintage 2,200 Silver (HK-449), 3,700 Bronze (HK-450), and 5 Gold (HK-1031). The surviving number of Wilson Dollars particularly in mint state is much less as many specimens were lost during WWII. When Japan invaded the Philippines in 1942 the U.S. government dumped 16 million Pesos in silver coins into Manila Bay to prevent it's seizure by the Japanese. Many Silver and Bronze Wilson Dollars were included in this dumping. Although many of these coins and medals were salvaged after the war the majority are heavily corroded from their long immersion in salt water. All Wilson Dollars are scarce particularily in true Mint State. All Wilson Dollars are scarce particularily in true Mint State. According to NGC and PCGS online population reports (3/10/2014) NGC and PCGS combined have only certified 120 Silver and 22 Bronze Wilson Dollars in MS60 and above.

This specimen has a particularly distinguished pedegree in that it is from the "Bill Weber Collection". Bill Weber was one of the foremost collectors of So-Called Dollars and one of the co-authors of the definitive So-Called Dollar reference "So-Called Dollars:An Illistrated Standard Catalog". After Mr. Weber 's death his So-Called Dollar collection was auctioned by Holabird-Kagin Americana (HKA Auction #2 - December 2, 2008). This specimen was lot # 10414 1201. It is described in the auction catalog as "A rare spectacular uncirculated example with very original toned surfaces. Mint green hues along the edges with an even mixture of grays and tans centrally. Certainly one of the finest toned examples to exist. Reverse is unusually well struck. According to Weber 's personal notes, "Nice early strike."

NGC Population: 32/57
PCGS Population:4/17
Slot: So-Called Wilson Dollar. Bronze Medal Commemorating the Operning of the Manila Mint. Dr. Greg Pineda Collection Pedigree
Origin/Country: United States PHILIPPINES
Design Description: SO-CALLED DOLLARS - HIBLER & KAPPEN
Item Description: BRONZE SC$1 1920 HK-450 WILSON DOLLAR MANILA MINT OPENING EX. DR. GREGORY PINEDA
Grade: NGC UNC DETAILS
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
So-Called Dollar, 1920 (M) HK-450 Wilson Dollar. Bronze 38.2mm, medal commemorating the "Opening of the Manila Mint".

The Bronze medal commemorating the "Opening of the Manila Mint" was struck at the U.S. Manila Mint in mid-July 1920. Speaker Osmena of the Filipino House of Representatives struck off the first medal during the July 15, 1920 opening day ceremony and 2000 specimens were struck on the first day. Up to 3700 Bronze Medals were produced and sold for fifty cents at the time of issue.

Many of the Bronze medals went unsold for years and were still in the Philippine Treasury at the outbreak of WWII. When Japan invaded the Philippines the Commonwealth government moved the contents of the Philippine Treasury from Manila to the island fortress of Corregidor. Prior to the fall of Corregidor 16 million Pesos in silver coins and many Silver and Bronze Wilson Dollars were dumped into Manila Bay to prevent there seizure by the Japanese. Although many of these coins and medals were salvaged after the war the majority are heavily corroded from their long immersion in salt water.

Bronze Wilson Dollars in a high state of preservation are much scarcer than the Silver medals. NGC and PCGS combined have only certified 22 Bronze Wilson dollars in MS60 and above. Unfortunately population reports for details graded coins are not available.

This attractive specimen from the Dr. Gregory Pineda Philippine Collection is 90% red with a touch of iridescent blue toning.

Slot: One Centavo Territorial Reverse (No Mint Mark), 1920 - 1922
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: BRONZE 1C 1921 USA-PHIL KM-163
Grade: NGC MS 65 RB
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 7,283,000
Composition: Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc and tin)
Weight: 4.7000g (80 Grains)
Diameter: 24mm
Mint Mark: None

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of One Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time One Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines. The One Centavo coins struck at the Manila Mint from 1920 through 1922 used the same obverse and reverse design as the 1903 - 1919 One Centavo and was struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M), 1921(M), and 1922(M) One Centavo is that they have no Mint Mark.

The One Centavo was designed by Melicio Figueroa. The obverse design shows a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

This beautiful GEM is 70% red, some blue toning and great eye appeal. The 1921 (M) One Centavo is a tough date to find in GEMUNC.

The NGC population for this coin in MS65 RB is only 5 specimens with none graded higher. NGC has graded no red specimens of this date in any grade. Combined NGC/PCGS Population 5/1 (12/01/2013).
Slot: One Centavo Territorial Reverse ("M" Mint Mark), 1925 - 1936
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: BRONZE 1C 1932 M USA-PHIL KM-163
Grade: NGC MS 66 RD
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 4,000,000
Composition: Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc and tin)
Weight: 4.7000g (80 grains)
Diameter: 24 mm
Mint Mark: M

The 1925 through 1936 One Centavo uses the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1903 - 1922 One Centavo and was struck to the same specifications. Starting in 1925 all One Centavos struck at the Manila Mint carried a M Mint Mark on the reverse to the left of the date.

The NGC population the 1932 M One Centavo in MS66 Red is 7 specimens with none graded higher. The combined NGC/PCGS certified population of this coin in MS66 Red is 17 coins with none graded higher (12/01/2013).

This gorgeous, well struck, specimen is a brilliant Full Red with proof like fields.
Slot: One Centavo Commonwealth Reverse, 1937 - 1941
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY COMMONWEALTH REVERSE
Item Description: BRONZE 1C 1937 M USA-PHIL KM-179
Grade: NGC MS 65 RD
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Specifications: (1937 through 1941) Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc and tin), 80 Grains, 24 mm; (1944) Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc), 80 Grains, 24 mm.

The One Centavos of 1937 through 1944 continue the same obverse design common to all Phillipine base medal coins from 1903 through 1936. In 1937 the reverse design of all US/Philippine coins were changed to reflect the new status for the Philippines as a Commonwealth of the United States. A smaller eagle was used, now perched atop a smaller shield with a banner below it inscribed "Commonwealth of the Philippines." The shield used was an adaptation of a design used for the official seal of "The Government of the Philippine Islands" which appeared on Philippine paper money starting in 1905.

The One Centavos of 1937 through 1941 were minted at the Manila Mint. During the 1942 through 1944 Japanese occupation of the Philippines nearly all coins disappeared from circulation, and most daily commerce was conducted with low denomination paper currency printed by Guerrilla military units, local municipalities, or Military and Civilian Currency Boards authorized by General MacArthur or the Commonwealth government-in-exile under President Quezon.

When American forces liberated the Philippines in 1944 - 1945 they brought with them Fifty Eight Million 1944 One Centavo coins minted at the San Francisco Mint.

The 1937 One Centavo had a mintage of 15,790,000. The NGC population for the 1937 M One Centavo in MS65 Red is 8 coins with only 3 specimens graded higher. The combined NGC/PCGS certified population of the 1937 M One Centavo in MS65 Red is 14 coins with 9 specimens graded higher (12/01/2013). This specimen is a brilliant, well struck GEM.
Slot: Five Centavos Territorial Reverse (No Mint Mark), 1920 - 1921
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: COPPER-NICKEL 5C 1921 USA-PHIL EX. WALDEN PHILIPPINE TERRITORIAL COLLECTION KM-164,
Grade: PCGS MS 64
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 2,132,000
Catalog: KM-164
Composition: Copper-Nickel
Weight: 5.2500g
Diameter: 21.3mm

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of Five Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time Five Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines.

The Five Centavos struck at the Manila Mint in 1920 and 1921 used the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1903 - 1919 Five Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M) and 1921(M) Five Centavos is that they have no Mint Mark.

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

A pleasing coin with an exemplary appearance. This lustrous TOP POP example of the 1921 Five Centavos is pedigreed from the "Walden Philippine Territorial Collection".

NGC Population: 2/0
PCGS Population: 11/0 (PCGS Condition Census)
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 13/0
Slot: Five Centavos Territorial Reverse,("M" Mint Mark), 1925 - 1928
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: COPPER-NICKEL 5C 1925 M USA-PHIL KM-164 EX. DR.ROGER R. MCFADDEN
Grade: NGC MS 64
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 1,000,000
Composition: Copper-Nickel
Weight: 5.2500g
Diameter: 21.3mm
Mint Mark: M

The 1925 M through 1928 M Five Centavos used the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1903 - 1921 Five Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. The distinguishing feature of the 1925 through 1928 Five Centavos is the addition of a "M" Mint Mark on the reverse to the left of the date.

This NGC Top Pop specimen has light gray toning with quite clean surfaces. A most elusive date in higher grades. From The Collection of Dr. Roger R. McFadden.

NGC Population: 5/0
PCGS Population: 12/1
NGC/PCGS Combined Population: 17/1
Slot: Five Centavos Reduced Size/Weight, 1930-1935
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: COPPER-NICKEL 5C 1930 M USA-PHIL KM-175 EX. DR.ROGER R. MCFADDEN
Grade: NGC MS 65
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 2,905,000
Catalog: KM-175
Composition: Copper-Nickel
Weight: 4.7500g
Diameter: 19mm

The obverse and reverse designs of the 1930 through 1935 (reduced size and weight) Five Centavos is the same as the 1903 through 1928 Five Centavos.

In 1907 a rise in the price of silver forced the reduction of the fineness and weight for all Philippine silver issues. The reduced size Twenty Centavos coins of 1907 - 1929 had a diameter of 21mm and were easily confused with the 21.3 mm Five Centavos of 1903 through 1928. This confusion resulted in a mismatching of dies for these two denominations in 1918 and again in 1928. A solution was found by reducing the diameter of the Five Centavos coin to 19 mm beginning in 1930. The reduced size and weight Five Centavos were made at the Manila Mint from 1930 through 1932, and again in 1934 and 1935.

In war time nickel and copper are strategic materials critical to a nations war effort. During the WWII Japanese occupation of the Philippines (1942 -1945) many pre-war Five Centavos were collected melted down and sent back to Japan

This specimen is a lightly toned Gem with a distinctive appearance. From The Collection of Dr. Roger R. McFadden.

NGC Population: 3/0
PCGS Population: 7/1
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 10/1
Slot: Five Centavos Commonwealth Reverse, 1937 - 1941
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY COMMONWEALTH REVERSE
Item Description: COPPER-NICKEL 5C 1941 M USA-PHIL KM-180
Grade: NGC MS 64
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
The Five Centavos of 1937 through 1945 continued the same obverse design used on the 1903 through 1935 Five Centavos. The reverse used the Commonwealth Arms design which was common to the 1936 commemoratives and all Philippine coins from 1937 through 1945.

In 1937 the reverse design of all US/Philippine coins were changed to reflect the new status for the Philippines as a Commonwealth of the United States. A smaller eagle was used, now perched atop a smaller shield with a banner below it inscribed "Commonwealth of the Philippines." The shield used was an adaptation of a design used for the official seal of "The Government of the Philippine Islands" which appeared on Philippine paper money starting in 1905.

Five Centavos were made at the Manila Mint in 1937, 1938 and 1941; at the Philadelphia Mint in 1944; and the San Francisco Mint in 1944 and 1945. Pre-war coins struck at the Manila Mint have the same size weight and composition as the 1930 through 1935 Five Centavos (Copper-Nickel, 75.16 Grains, 4.80 Grams,19 mm). During World War ll copper and nickel were strategic metals needed for the war effort. This resulted in the adoption of a copper-nickel-zink alloy for the 1944 and 1945 Five Centavos. The new alloy was 65% copper, 23% zink, and 12% nickel. The 1944 and 1945 Five Centavos had a weight of 4.92 Grams.

The 1941 M Five Centavos had a mintage of 2,750,000. The NGC population for this coin in MS64 is six coins with only one specimen graded higher. The combined NGC/PCGS certified population for the 1941 M Five Centavos in MS64 is 18 coins with only 7 specimens graded higher (12/01/2013).
Slot: Ten Centavos Territorial Reverse (No Mint Mark), 1920 - 1921
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: SILVER 10C 1921 USA-PHIL KM-169
Grade: NGC MS 65
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 3,863,000
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 2.0000g (30.86 grains)
ASW: 0.0482oz
Diameter: 16.7 mm
Edge: Reeded
Mint Mark: None

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of Ten Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time Ten Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines. The Ten Centavos struck at the Manila Mint in 1920 and 1921 used the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1907 - 1919 Ten Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M) and 1921(M) Ten Centavos is that they have no Mint Mark.

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino woman standing to the right in a flowing dress while striking an anvil with a hammer held in her right hand, the left hand is raised and holding an olive branch. In the background is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

NGC Population: 5/0
PCGS Population: 9/2
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 14/2 (12/01/2013)

This GEMBU specimen has full luster and is a NGC Top Pop coin.
Slot: Ten Centavos Territorial Reverse ("M" Mint Mark), 1929 & 1935
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: SILVER 10C 1935 M USA-PHIL KM-169
Grade: NGC MS 65
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 1,280,000
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 2.0000g (30.86 grains)
ASW: 0.0482oz
Diameter: 16.7 mm
Edge: Reeded
Mint Mark: M

The 1929 M and 1935 M Ten Centavos have the same obverse and reverse design as the 1907 through 1921 Ten Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. The distinguishing feature of the 1925 M and 1935 M Ten Centavos is the addition of a "M" Mint Mark on the reverse to the left of the date.

This GEM BU specimen is from the famous "Just Having Fun" collection. It is well struck with lightly toned lustrous surfaces. NGC has certified eight coins at this level with five finer. PCGS has certified seven coins at this level with two finer. Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 15/7 (12/13/2013).
Slot: Ten Centavos Commonwealth Reverse, 1937 - 1941
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY COMMONWEALTH REVERSE
Item Description: SILVER 10C 1941 M USA-PHIL KM-181
Grade: NGC MS 66
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 2,500,000
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 2.0000g (30.86 grains)
ASW: 0.0482oz
Diameter: 16.7 mm
Edge: Reeded
Mint Mark: M

The Ten Centavos of 1937 through 1941 continued the same obverse design that was used on the 1907 - 1935 Ten Centavos and was struck to the same specifications. The reverse used the Commonwealth Arms design which was common to to the 1936 commemoratives and all Philippine coins from 1937 through 1945.

In 1937 the reverse design of all US/Philippine coins were changed to reflect the new status for the Philippines as a Commonwealth of the United States. A smaller eagle was used, now perched atop a smaller shield with a banner below it inscribed "Commonwealth of the Philippines." The shield used was an adaptation of a design used for the official seal of "The Government of the Philippine Islands" which appeared on Philippine paper money starting in 1905.

The 1941 M Ten Centavos has a great deal of historical signifiance in that this coin was born on the eve of World War ll and was certainly among the last coins produced at the Manila Mint before the Japanese invaded the Philippines.

The NGC population for the 1941 M Ten Centavos in MS66 is twelve coins with only four specimens graded higher. The combined NGC/PCGS cerftified population is 23/5 (12/01/2013).

This specimen is a fully struck, brilliant, untoned SUBERB GEM.
Slot: Twenty Centavos Territorial Reverse (No Mint Mark), 1920 - 1921
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: SILVER 20C 1920 USA-PHIL KM-170
Grade: NGC MS 64
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Mintage: 1,046,000
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 4.0000g (61.72 grains)
ASW: 0.0964oz
Diameter: 21 mm
Edge: Reeded
Mint Mark: None

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of Twenty Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time Twenty Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines. The Twenty Centavos struck at the Manila Mint in 1920 and 1921 used the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1907 - 1919 Twenty Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M) and 1921(M) Twenty Centavos is that they have no Mint Mark.

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino woman standing to the right in a flowing dress while striking an anvil with a hammer held in her right hand, the left hand is raised and holding an olive branch. In the background is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

NGC Population 2/1
PCGS Population: 4/2
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 6/3

This condition census GEMBU specimen has nice strike and full luster, as it came from the mint!
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