What comes next? You've been freed. Do you know how hard it is to lead?
1823 Argentina Buenos Aires Decimo

Obverse:

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Reverse:

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Coin Details

Origin/Country: ARGENTINA
Item Description: DECIMO 1823 BUENOS AIRES
Full Grade: NGC MS 63 BN
Owner: coinsandmedals

Set Details

Custom Sets: What comes next? You've been freed. Do you know how hard it is to lead?
Competitive Sets: This coin is not competing in any sets.
Research: NGC Coin Price Guide
NGC World Coin Census

Owner Comments:

A second order would see another four million d├ęcimo pieces delivered to Buenos Aires by 1825 (Doty, 1998). The eight million coins would prove more than sufficient, and eventually, many of these pieces would be overstruck and reissued. These overstruck pieces can be readily found, but most of them are in well-circulated condition. Likewise, the currency issue pieces that were not overstruck are seldom seen in higher grades, with most falling in the MS-60 to MS-63 range. True gem examples with remaining color are seldom seen.



Obverse: The obverse design is remarkably similar to the current Argentine national coat-of-arms. It depicts an elliptical shape, the interior of which contains two outstretched hands shaking while holding a pike with a Phrygian cap resting at the tip. The upper half of the elliptical shape is distinguished by horizontal lines that fall behind the pike and cap, which presumably is meant to symbolize the blue sky. A radiating sun appears immediately above the center of the elliptical shape. A wreath of two branches tied together flanks both sides of the elliptical shape but does not completely engulf it. This entire design is contained within a beaded border and a thin raised rim.

Reverse: The reverse depicts a similar wreath as the one on the reverse, but this time it completely engulfs the entire design. Contained within the wreath is the legend BUENOS AYRES UN DECIMO, which conforms to the curved nature of the wreath. The date, 1823 appears in the center of the reverse but is completely enclosed by the legend. This entire design is contained within a beaded border and a thin raised rim.

Edge: Plain edge

Alignment: Coin

Notes: It appears the currency pieces are found with both coin and medal alignment, with the medal alignment examples being slightly scarcer. This example is struck in coin alignment and is typical of the surviving mint state examples that can be found today. Although I hope to eventually upgrade this piece, I understand it may be years before an opportunity presents itself. Beyond a few toning spots this is an attractive example of the type, I just wish it were more equally matched with the proof in this set.

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