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Coins I have had graded.

Owner:  coin928
Last Modified:  10/21/2022
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Slot: Very Happy
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: 1/2C 1903 USA-PHIL ALLEN-1.01
Grade: NGC MS 65 RD
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #1.01 (KM #162) - Mintage: 12,084,000

Certified examples of the 1903 Half Centavo are quite plentiful and full red specimens (even at this grade) are easily obtainable at a reasonable price.

This coin is relatively well struck with beautiful, even red coloring and great eye appeal. I obtained it for a very modest price on eBay and it is one of the first coins I submitted directly to NGC for grading. I was hoping for MS66RD, but the outcome was more than acceptable. As of this revision, it is one of 82 graded by NGC as MS65RD with only 8 finer at MS66RD.

Date acquired: 10/29/2007 (raw)
Date graded: 12/01/2007 (self submitted to NGC)

Rev. 4/8/2019
Slot: Happy
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: 1C 1933 M USA-PHIL ALLEN-2.30
Grade: NGC MS 64 RD
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #2.30 (KM #163) - Mintage: 8,392,692

The one centavo was the only denomination struck at the Manila mint in 1933, which may account for the large number of well struck full red and red brown examples that are still available today.

This particular coin exhibits an above average strike and high point detail for this date. The color is a magnificent vibrant red and I was pleased to add it to my collection as a raw coin. It is one of the first coins I submitted to NGC with the certificate I received upon joining. The scratches on the obverse on the figures knee and torso are probably what prevented it from obtaining a higher grade.

Varieties
------------
ALLEN-2.30a - Repunched Date (RPD). This variety is recognized by both NGC and PCGS.

Date acquired: 3/12/2007 (raw coin)
Date graded: 12/01/2007 (self submitted to NGC )

Rev 12/12/2018
Slot: Extremely Happy
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: 10C 1945 D DDR USA-PHIL ALLEN-9.05b
Grade: NGC MS 63
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #9.05b (KM #181) - Doubled Die Type #1. Total Mintage: 137,208,000 (variety mintage unknown)

General
------------------------------------------------
The 1945D 10 Centavo piece has the highest mintage of any US/Philippine era coin, and is one of only two issues exceeding a mintage of 100,000,000 (the other being the 1944S One Centavo which was minted in both 1944 and 1945, but only dated 1944). The high mintage of coins in 1944 and 1945 was necessary since virtually all previously issued coinage had disappeared during the Japanese occupation. Because of the high demand, dies were used well beyond their normal life and pieces struck from highly eroded dies are very common.

High mintage figures often imply common coins, but also provide the opportunity for some highly collectable varieties! With 137,208,000 minted by the US Mint in Denver, it's not surprising that there are a number of die varieties. Lyman Allen lists three in addition to the normal date:

Varieties
------------------------------------------------
9.05 - Normal date

9.05a - Repunched mint mark D/D (This Coin) Even within this variety, at least 4 sub-types exist with various orientations of the initial and secondary mint mark punches. Over the years, I have acquired examples of North-South (near), South-North (far), South-North (near), and Northwest-Southeast orientations.

9.05b - Doubled Die Obverse type 1. This variety is easily identified by the dramatic doubling of "UNITED", "STATES", all four digits of the date, and the bottom tip of the shield.

9.05c - Doubled Die Obverse type 2. This doubled die variety is not nearly as dramatic as 9.05b, but can still be identified with minimal magnification. There is a very slight doubling of "45" in the date, doubling of all of the letters in "UNITED", doubling of the letters "STAT" in STATES, and slight doubling of the letters "MER" in AMERICA.

In addition to the three varieties that have been cataloged, there is at least one other significant obverse doubled die variety in which all of the "P"s in the scroll text of "COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES" are very noticeably doubled.

This Coin
------------------------------------------------
This particular 9.05b exhibits a very full strike (including the word "of" just above the date) even though it was obviously struck from a heavily used pair of dies. The erosion lines emanating from the tips of the letters to the rim of the coin are easily visible without magnification. This coin was the first uncirculated example of this dramatic double die graded by NGC.

Date acquired: 9/24/2006 (raw coin)
Date graded: 12/01/2007 (self submitted to NGC)

Rev. 11/29/2015
Slot: Satisfied
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: PESO 1904 USA-PHIL ALLEN-16.03
Grade: NGC MS 62
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #16.03 (KM #168) - Mintage: 10,000

The mintage may seem low, but these coins are relatively common in mint state. 10,000 uncirculated sets were ordered by the well known numismatist Farran Zerbe to be sold at the Philippine Exhibit at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis in1904. Supply far exceeded demand for these sets, and only 3,254 were sold at the exposition. The remaining 6,746 sets were shipped to the Philippines where another 500 were sold by the Treasury. The 6,246 unsold sets were ultimately released into general circulation.

This piece is very well struck and has reasonably good eye appeal, but a few too many contact marks must have kept if from garnering a higher grade.

Date acquired: 12/31/2004 (raw coin)
Date graded: 12/01/2007 (self submitted to NGC)

Rev. 11/26/2015
Slot: Satisfied
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: PESO 1904 USA-PHIL Doubled "4" ALLEN-16.03a
Grade: NGC PF 58
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #16.03a - 1904/4 (KM #168) - Total mintage: 1355 (Variety mintage unknown)

Proof mintage for this year was limited to 1,355 sets. The seven coin Philippine proof sets were produced at the Philadelphia mint from 1903 through 1908 (excluding 1907), and were sold to the general public for $2.00 per set. At the time these sets were produced, there was no protective packaging. Each coin was individually wrapped in tissue paper and placed in a plain paper coin envelope. As a result, many proof coins exhibit micro thin hairline scratches as well as heavy toning. When combined with very low mintages, and low initial sales to the public, it's easy to see why fully gem proof coins are very rare.

Proof sets in 1904 were struck on order. In addition to the 1,355 regular proof sets, another 10,000 uncirculated sets were ordered by the well known numismatist Farran Zerbe to be sold at the Philippine Exhibit at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis in1904. Supply far exceeded demand for these uncirculated sets, and only 3,254 were sold at the exposition. The remaining 6,746 sets were shipped to the Philippines where another 500 were sold by the Treasury. The 6,246 unsold sets were ultimately released into general circulation.

Although it was not originally attributed as such on the holder, it can easily be seen that this is the repunched date variety. The substantial doubling of the "4" can easily be seen in the close-up scan. The 16.03a is the only proof coin variety listed by Lyman Allen in his book ";U.S./ Philippine Coins - 6th Edition 2008 - 2009."

This coin was actually purchased raw as a 1904 "Prooflike" Peso, so I was greatly pleased to discover that it was not only a proof, but the variety as well! The entire surface of the coin is mirror-like with no toning or spots whatsoever. Despite the handling marks which kept it from grading above PF58, it has great eye appeal and a "WOW" factor that is difficult to capture in a photograph and impossible with a scanner. The reflections in the reverse (from left to right) are the light bulb, the lamp shade, and the camera lens.

Date acquired: 6/6/2005 (raw coin)
Date graded: 12/15/2007 (self submitted to NGC)
Date attributed: 9/28/2016 (resubmitted to NGC for attribution)

References:
- Allen, L. "U.S./Philippine Coins" 6th Edition 2008-2009 published by Lyman Allen Rare Coins Virginia City, NV 2007
- Shafer, N. "United States Territorial Coinage for the Philippine Islands." Racine, Wisconsin: Whitman Publishing Company, 1961.

Rev. 10/11/2017
Slot: Disappointed
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: 50C 1936 M USA-PHIL MURPHY-QUEZON ALLEN-18.00
Grade: NGC MS 63
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #18.00 (KM #176) - Mintage: 20,000

THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES was founded on November 15th, 1935. To commemorate this historic event, a set of three coins containing one 50 Centavo piece and 2 different One Peso pieces was minted at the Manila Mint. The issue price for this set was $3.13USD! Despite the historical significance, low mintage of 10,000 sets and the low issue price, many sets remained unsold and languished in the Philippine Treasury. When the Japanese invaded in 1941, the vast majority of these unsold sets were dumped into the Pacific Ocean to keep them from falling into enemy hands. This is the reason that so many of these coins exhibit damage due to prolonged exposure to salt water and are thus described as “sea salvaged.”

The mintage for the 50 Centavo coin was 20,000, so 10,000 must have either been sold separately or issued to the public at face value.

These three coins were the first to bear the new Commonwealth reverse designed by Ambrosio Morales which was applied to all production coins beginning in 1937. The obverse of this coin depicts the busts of the first Philippine President, Manual L. Quezon on the right, facing U.S. Governor General, Frank Murphy on the left. As a commemorative issues, these coins are typically very well struck.

This particular coin is very well struck and lustrous example of this rare Manila Mint issue.

Date acquired: 11/29/2008 (raw coin)
Date graded: 6/23/2009 (self submitted to NGC)

Rev. 8/25/2015
Slot: Very Happy
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: SO-CALLED DOLLARS - HIBLER & KAPPEN
Item Description: SC$1 1920 HK-449 WILSON DOLLAR MANILA MINT OPENING ALLEN-M1
Grade: NGC MS 62
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Philippines - 1920 HK-449 Silver SC$1 Wilson Dollar / Manila Mint Opening - Allen #M1 - Mintage: 2,200

This piece is a bit of a stretch for my Minted in the USA set but is perfect to start off the Mint of the Philippine Islands set. It’s not a coin, nor was it struck at a mint in the USA. It was however struck in a new mint constructed in an insular territory of the United States of America. This so-called “Wilson Dollar” was very likely struck on July 15, 1920, to commemorate the opening day of the Philippine Mint in Manila which would be used almost exclusively to produce US/Philippine coinage.

The obverse is dominated by the portrait of President Woodrow Wilson who is identified only as the “PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.” It was designed by George T. Morgan and is a slightly abbreviated version of the design found on the second Wilson inauguration medal in the United States Mint Presidential series.

The female figure on the reverse is often assumed to be Liberty, since this is a U.S. Mint medal. Occasionally, she is identified as Justice, probably because of the scales she is holding in her right hand. Neither of these are correct however. The reverse (also designed by Morgan) actually depicts "Juno Moneta" protecting and instructing a novice in the art and science of coin production. Juno Moneta is the Roman Goddess of Good Counsel, whose name means "Adviser" or "Warner", a very appropriate choice for a medal commemorating the opening of a mint.

According the The British Museum, "The origins of the modern English words 'money' and 'mint' lie in ancient Rome. In the period of the Roman Republic, from about 300 BC onwards, coins were made near the temple of the goddess Juno Moneta. It was located on the Capitol (the modern Campidoglio), the citadel of Rome. The goddess's name, Moneta ('Warner' or 'Reminder') eventually came to refer to the place where the coins were made, the 'mint', and to its product, 'money', both of which derive ultimately from the Latin word moneta."

The design of the medal was first credited to Clifford Hewitt by noted numismatist and polymath Gilbert S. Perez who was present at the Philippine Mint on July 15, 1920 for the opening ceremonies. In 1921, he published his first person accounting of the events in Numismatic Notes And Monographs No. 8, The Mint of the Philippine Islands in which he stated Speaker Osmeña of the House of Representatives [...] struck off the first medal (designed by Mr. Clifford Hewitt) which was issued in commemoration of the opening. The medal was certainly struck under the direction of Mr. Hewitt, who was responsible for the assembly and installation of the minting equipment, but the design and engraving credit clearly belongs to George T. Morgan. Morgan's initial even appears on the base of Wilson's bust on the obverse and and to the right of Juno's left foot on the reverse. We will never know exactly why Gilbert Perez credited the design to Clifford Hewett, but since he did, that credit has been propagated by many other authoritative sources. Mr. Perez also described the reverse design as the figure of Liberty protecting and instructing beginners in the art of coining, holding in her right hand a pair of scales to demonstrate the absolute necessity for care and exactness in operation which all mint work demands. He got that wrong too, so his errant credit of the design to Mr. Hewitt may not be that surprising. Fact checking in the 1920s was not as rigorous as it is today.

3,700 of these medals were stuck in bronze, 2,200 in silver, and a small quantity in gold. The number stuck in gold is most commonly quoted as 5, although six are known to have been certified by the grading services and many very knowledgeable dealers maintain that even more uncertified examples exist. The 1934 treasurers report states that at the end of 1934, 1,053 of the silver and 2,117 of bronze medals remained unsold. Mint records from 1935-1938 do not provide the same level of detail as in 1934, but it is possible to speculate on how many of each remained unsold in 1938. Demand for these mint opening medals rose shaprly when the Commonwealth of the Philippines was born in 1935 and the three commemorative coins were issued in 1936. At the end of 1938, less than 700 silver medals and less than 1800 bronze medals remained in the treasure. This represents about 30% of the silver 48% of the bronze medals so it is very likely that 1,500 to 1,600 silver medals and 1,800 to 2,000 bronze medals may have escaped being dumped into the Pacific Ocean in 1941 to keep them from falling into enemy hands when Japan invaded the Islands. These pieces were salvaged after the war but were corroded by the exposure to sea water, and are often sold as “sea salvaged.” Many of those that escaped the ravages of the salt water have been cleaned, so pristine, unadulterated examples are relatively rare, particularly in Bronze.


This Medal
This particular medal is one of the 2,200 minted in silver and originally sold for $1.00 in 1920. I purchased this specimen raw and submitted it to NGC myself for certification and grading. I was very pleased with the result.

Date acquired: 4/12/2005 (raw medal)
Date graded: 6/23/2009 (self submitted to NGC)

References
  • Coins, Medals and Tokens of the Philippines 1728-1974 by Aldo P. Basso, second edition Bookman Printing House, Quezon City, 1975
  • Numismatic Notes And Monographs No. 8, The Mint of the Philippine Islands by Gilbert S. Perez, The American Numismatic Association, New York, NY, 1921
  • United States Territorial Coinage for the Philippine Islands by Neil Shafer, Whitman Publishing Company Racine, Wisconsin, 1961
Rev. 11/6/2017
Slot: Disappointed
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: 1C 1925 M USA-PHIL ALLEN-2.22
Grade: NGC MS 63 RD
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #2.22 (KM #163) - Mintage: 9,332,000

The 1925 Centavo is the first to be produced by the Manila mint with a mint mark. A sturdy looking block "M" was added at the suggestion of the well known numismatist, Dr. Gilbert S. Perez. These coins tend to be well struck and full red examples are available.

This coin is one of many well struck, full red coins struck from an easily identifiable die pair. The obverse exhibits a number of small surface blobs particularly above the letters "IP" and below the "N" in "FILIPINAS" which indicate that it was minted with a die pitted by rust. This is quite possibly because the die had been left over from 1922 and had been sitting idle for 3 years. This particular coin is a beautiful red example which would seem to deserve a higher grade if not for the scratch across the chest of the male figure on the obverse.

Varieties: None cataloged for this year.

Date acquired: 5/31/2009 (raw coin)
Date graded: 6/23/2009 (self submitted to NGC)

References:
- "The Numismatist," August 1939, pp.635. "Comment on the Philippine Coinage" by Dr. Gilbert S. Perez.

Rev. 12/10/2015
Slot: Disappointed
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: PESO 1909 S USA-PHIL ALLEN-17.04
Grade: NGC MS 61
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #17.04 (KM #172) - Mintage: 7,578,000

Date acquired: 2/18/2005 (Raw coin)
Date graded: 5/24/2012 (self submitted to NGC)

Rev.: 11/27/2015
Slot: Satisfied
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: 50C 1906 USA-PHIL ALLEN-13.06
Grade: NGC PF 63
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #13.06 (KM #167) - Mintage: 500.

Proof mintage for this year was limited to 500 sets. Other than the 1906S Peso, no coins were produced for general circulation in 1906.

Unlike the three previous years, the 1906 proof sets were not made to order. Philippine Governor-General Henry C. Idle authorized 500 sets to be struck to satisfy the small collector demand for these sets. These sets were offered for sale by the Bureau of Insular Affairs and the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia well into the early 1930s'.

The seven coin Philippine proof sets were produced at the Philadelphia mint from 1903 through 1908 (excluding 1907), and were sold to the general public for $2.00 per set. At the time these sets were produced, there was no protective packaging. Each coin was individually wrapped in tissue paper and placed in a plain paper coin envelope. As a result, many proof coins exhibit micro thin hairline scratches as well as heavy toning. When combined with very low mintages, and low initial sales to the public, it's easy to see why fully gem proof coins are very rare.

This particular coin is a an exceptionally well preserved example of this rare date.

Date acquired: 10/27/2006 (raw coin)
Date graded: 5/24/2010 (self submitted to NGC)

References:
- Shafer, N. "United States Territorial Coinage for the Philippine Islands." Racine, Wisconsin: Whitman Publishing Company, 1961.

Rev. 2/9/2019
Slot: Very Disappointed
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: PESO 1908 S USA-PHIL ALLEN-17.03
Grade: NGC AU 53
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #17.03 (KM #172) - Mintage: 20,954,944

Really beautiful low grade AU Silver Peso.

Date acquired:5/2/2010 (raw coin)
Date graded: 5/24/2010 (self submitted to NGC)

Rev 1/2/2016
Slot: Extremely Disappointed
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: PESO 1904 S USA-PHIL ALLEN-16.04
Grade: NGC AU Details
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #16.04 (KM #168) - Mintage: 6,600,000

Date acquired: 7/19/2008 (raw coin)
Date graded: 5/24/2010 (self submitted to NGC)

Rev. 1/2/2016
Slot: Mildly Disappointed
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: 10C 1905 USA-PHIL ALLEN-7.05
Grade: NGC PF 58
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #7.05 (KM #165) - Mintage 471

Proof mintage for this year was limited to 471 sets making this the rarest of all of the Proof Centavos. The seven coin Philippine proof sets were produced at the Philadelphia mint from 1903 through 1908 (excluding 1907), and were sold to the general public for $2.00 per set. At the time these sets were produced, there was no protective packaging. Each coin was individually wrapped in tissue paper and placed in a plain paper coin envelope. As a result, many proof coins exhibit micro thin hairline scratches as well as heavy toning. When combined with very low mintages, and low initial sales to the public, it's easy to see why fully gem proof coins are very rare.

It is interesting to note that as in 1903 and 1904, 1905 proof sets were only minted on order. Obviously the novelty had worn off, and collector interest had declined so significantly that only 471 sets were ordered. By the end of 1905, all sets had been acquired by collectors and none remained for future purchase from the mint.

This coin, while far from perfect, is still a very attractive coin. In spite of the spots and light rub, it still exhibits a full proof luster and semi cameo effect. This coin was purchased raw and self submitted to NGC. I was hoping for better, but the PF58 grade is an appropriate one given its condition.

Date acquired: 2/10/2007 (raw coin)
Date graded: 5/24/2010 (self submitted to NGC)

References
- Shafer, N. "United States Territorial Coinage for the Philippine Islands." Racine, Wisconsin: Whitman Publishing Company, 1961.

Rev. 11/27/2015
Slot: Extremely Happy
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: 1C 1918 S USA-PHIL LARGE S ALLEN-2.16a
Grade: NGC AU 58 BN
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #2.16a (KM #163) - Total Mintage: 11,660,000 ("Large S" Variety mintage unknown)

Depending on the source, there may be as many as 68 distinct varieties for all of the various dates in the US Philippines One Centavo series. The 1918 Large "S" variety is however the most well known and well documented. It is also the only variety deemed significant enough to be specifically included in the NGC Registry set definition.

The normal mint mark on these coins is between 1.2 and 1.3 millimeters tall and is centered between the dot and the rim. The "S" on the Large "S" variety is 2.0 millimeters tall and based on the size and shape, appears to have been produced using the punch intended for the Fifty Centavo pieces of the same year. A 1918 S Medium "S" variety with a mint mark measuring 1.5 millimeters in height is also known to exist as well as a Small "S" variety of unknown height.

This particular coin is dark brown with hints of red and orange and is a high grade AU example of this rare variety.

Varieties
------------
ALLEN-2.16a - Large "S"
Medium "S," as yet uncataloged. The "S" mint mark measures 1.5 millimeters in height.
Small "S," as yet uncataloged. The mint mark size is unknown, but noticeably smaller than the normal "S."

Date acquired: 3/05/2005 (raw coin)
Date graded: 12/3/2010 (self submitted to NGC)

Rev. 12/9/2015
Slot: Very Happy
Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: PHILIPPINES UNDER U.S. SOVEREIGNTY
Item Description: 50C 1903 USA-PHIL ALLEN-13.01
Grade: NGC PF 63
Research: View Coin
Owner Comments
Lyman Allen #13.01 (KM #167) - Mintage: 2,558

Mintage for the first year of US/Philippine proof coin production was limited to 2,558 sets. The seven coin Philippine proof sets were produced at the Philadelphia mint from 1903 through 1908 (excluding 1907), and were sold to the general public for $2.00 per set. At the time these sets were produced, there was no protective packaging. Each coin was individually wrapped in tissue paper and placed in a plain paper coin envelope. As a result, many proof coins exhibit micro thin hairline scratches as well as heavy toning. When combined with very low mintages, and low initial sales to the public, it's easy to see why fully gem proof coins are very rare.

This particular coin has spectacular eye appeal. The fields are highly reflective, and the devices are almost cameo like in appearance, particularly on the reverse.

Date acquired: 3/16/2005 (raw coin)
Date graded: 12/6/10 (self submitted to NGC)

References:
- Shafer, N. "United States Territorial Coinage for the Philippine Islands." Racine, Wisconsin: Whitman Publishing Company, 1961.

Rev. 2/23/2015
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