Bill Jones' Type Set Excluding Modern Issues
1c FLOWING HAIR, WREATH 1793

Obverse:

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Reverse:

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Coin Details

Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: CENTS - FLOWING HAIR, WREATH REVERSE
Item Description: 1C 1793 WREATH VINE&BARS
Full Grade: NGC AU 55 BN
Owner: BillJones

Set Details

Custom Sets: This coin is not in any custom sets.
Competitive Sets: Bill Jones' Type Set   Score: 5665
Bill Jones' Large Cent Type Set   Score: 5665
Bill Jones' Type Set Excluding Modern Issues   Score: 5665
Research: NGC Coin Explorer NGC Coin Price Guide
NGC US Coin Census for Flowing Hair Cents (1793)

Owner Comments:

The 1793 Wreath cent replaced the Chain cent, which caused considerable controversy. The offending chain design, which had left Ms. “liberty in chains” was replaced by a wreath on the reverse. On the obverse Ms. Liberty still had a wild, wind-blown appearance, but the relief was higher which improved the coin’s durability while in circulation. Despite the design change, the wild looking Ms. Liberty still offended some critics which resulted in another design change before the end of the year.

Most of the Wreath cents had the vines and bars edge device that had appeared on the Chain cents. At the end of the series the edge was changed to read, “ONE HUNDRED FOR A DOLLAR.” This lettering was placed on the edge by a casting machine. Two minor varieties of these lettered edge Wreath cents are known. The first pieces, which are known to large cent die variety collectors as Sheldon 11-b, have two leaves at the end of the inscription. This coin, which is a Sheldon 11-c, has one leaf.

This large cent was made from impure copper as evidenced by the two tones of metal on the obverse. In these early days copper was recovered from many sources, and many times it was less than pure. This coin reflects that early mint problem.

When this coin is placed beside the 1793 half cent, which was minted at about the same time, the die work is virtually identical. It is obvious that the dies for these two coins were fashioned by the same hand, perhaps Henry Voigt or even Joseph Wright.

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