Obverse:

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Reverse:

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Coin Details

Origin/Country: United States
Design Description: SO-CALLED DOLLARS - HIBLER & KAPPEN
Item Description: SILVER SC$1 1920 HK-449 WILSON DOLLAR MANILA MINT OPENING
Full Grade: NGC MS 63
Owner: JAA

Owner Comments:

1920 (M) HK-449 SO-CALLED DOLLAR
WILSON DOLLAR
SILVER MEDAL COMMEMORATING THE OPENING OF THE MANILA MINT
NGC MS63

SPECIFICATIONS
Mint: Manila
Mint Mark: None
Composition: .800 silver, .200 copper
Weight: 440 grains
Diameter:38.2 mm
Edge: Plain

Dies for the " Wilson Dollar" were cut by by George Morgan, who was the Mint's Chief Engraver in 1920, and who was also responsible for the U.S. Morgan Silver Dollar.

OBVERSE
The obverse presents a well executed portrait of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. Inscriptions are; "PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES".

REVERSE
The reverse shows a representation of "Juno Moneta" (the goddess of money and minting) kneeling and watching over a nude youth who is pouring planchets (coin blanks) into a coining press. Inscriptions are: "TO COMMEMORATE THE OPENING OF THE MINT", MANILA P.I.", and "1920". A small letter M (for Morgan) is inscribed to the right of Juno Moneta's left foot. The design used is a modification of a much earlier Morgan design that was used on several of the U.S. Assay Commissions Annual Medals in the 1880s and 1890s.




Left: reverse of the 1890 U.S. Assay Commission Medal. Right: reverse of the 1920 Manila Mint Opening Commemorative Medal.

Mintage 2,200 Silver (HK-449), 3,700 Bronze (HK-450), and between 5 and 15 Gold (HK-1031). The surviving number of Wilson Dollars particularly in mint state is much less as many specimens were lost during WWII. When Japan invaded the Philippines in 1942 the U.S. government dumped 16 million Pesos in silver coins into Manila Bay to prevent it's seizure by the Japanese. Many Silver and Bronze Wilson Dollars were included in this dumping. Although many of these coins and medals were salvaged after the war the majority are heavily corroded from their long immersion in salt water.

All Wilson Dollars are scarce particularly in true Mint State. According to NGC and PCGS online population reports (3/10/2014) NGC and PCGS combined have only certified 120 Silver and 22 Bronze Wilson Dollars in MS60 and above.

NGC PHOTO PROOF STATEMENT REGARDING THIS SPECIMEN
"The opening of the Manila Mint in The Philippines prompted the production there of handsome medals in bronze, silver and gold. The dies were sculpted by U.S. Mint Chief Engraver George T. Morgan. Of the 2,200 silver impressions struck, an unknown quantity was dumpted into the sea to prevent their capture by the advancing Japanese Army in 1942. pristine examples such as this choice silver piece are thus quite rare. Well struck overall and highly lustrous, this lovely medal displays subtle blushes of gold, blue and red at its peripheries. NGC has certified 48 examples as MS63 and just 31 finer (11-21)."

Auction Appearances Of This Specimen:
Stephen Album Rare Coins (www.stevealbum.com) Auction 31, Lot 1010, Item No:237255
Cookie Jar Collectibles, September 2019, Philippine Mail Bid Sale XXII+, Lot # 974.

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