BRUCE THOMAS COLLECTION OF SO-CALLED DOLLARS AND OTHER MEDALS
HK-072 MS 63 GILT COPPER

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Coin Details

Origin/Country: UNITED STATES PHILADELPHIA, PA 1876
Design Description: SO-CALLED DOLLARS - HIBLER & KAPPEN
Item Description: GILT COPPER SC$1 (1876) PA HK-72 AMERICAN COLONIES US CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION HK-72 Bruce Thomas Collection
Full Grade: NGC MS 63
Owner: Bruce Thomas Collection

Set Details

Custom Sets: BRUCE THOMAS COLLECTION OF SO-CALLED DOLLARS AND OTHER MEDALS
Competitive Sets: This coin is not competing in any sets.
Research: NGC Coin Explorer NGC Coin Price Guide

Owner Comments:

U.S. CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION 1876 PHILADELPHIA, PA AMERICAN COLONIES DOLLAR.

FORMERLY FROM THE DONALD ENSLEY COLLECTION IN MICHIGAN.

THIS MEDAL TYPE IS LISTED IN THE REFERENCE BOOK AS BEING MADE IN BRONZE, BRASS, WHITE METAL, AND PROOF SILVER ONLY. AN XRF ANALYSIS TEST THAT I HAD DONE PRIOR TO GRADING SHOWS THAT THIS MEDAL IS 99.2% COPPER AND .8% GOLD, THEREFORE GILT COPPER.

A RAW AU EXAMPLE OF THIS TYPE WAS SOLD BY STACKS BOWERS IN 2014 FOR $352.50. IT APPEARS TO ALSO BE GILT, NOT BRONZE AS HK-72 IS NORMALLY FOUND. I DO NOT FIND ANY OTHER EXAMPLES OF HK-72 SOLD BY EITHER OF THE MAJOR AUCTION COMPANIES.

LAURYNN DAVIS WITH NGC SAYS THAT THERE ARE NOTES IN HER BOOK THAT SHOW THAT SOME OF THE GRADED BRASS HK-72'S APPEAR TO BE GILT, BUT DID NOT LIST THE BASE METAL TYPE. NGC DID NOT DENOTE THIS AS GILT COPPER DUE TO LAURYNN'S NOTES ABOVE, BUT IT IS CERTAINLY NOT HK-72 BRASS AS DENOTED IN THE HK BOOK.

MY THOUGHTS ARE THAT THIS MEDAL WAS STRUCK ON A 38 MM GILT PLANCHET, MADE EITHER BY MISTAKE, OR ON PURPOSE FOR SOMEONE TO HAVE A ONE OFF EXAMPLE, THIS MEDAL IS THE SAME SIZE AND STRUCK IN GILT AS QUITE A FEW OTHER MEDALS MADE AT THE CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION WERE (HK-22, 44, 46B, 50, 54, 58, 61A, 64, 67, AND 69). MOST OF THESE ARE LISTED AS GILT ONLY IN THE REFERENCE BOOK, ONLY HK-69 IS ACTUALLY CALLED GILT COPPER IN THE REFERENCE BOOK.

TIED WITH (1) OTHER MS 63 AND (1) MS 63 PL, WITH ONLY (1) MS 64 PL FINER OVERALL OF ONLY (9) LISTED IN THE NGC CENSUS AS OF 9/2020. THE FINER GRADED EXAMPLES MIGHT OR MIGHT NOT BE BRASS???

Purpose: To commemorate 100th anniversary of signing of United States Declaration of Independence.

Organization: Our first major multiple-building World's Fair; distinguished by direct Federal sponsorship. After spirited rivalry among larger cities, Congressional Acts 1871, 1872 settled issue; also created Centennial Commission on which all states and territories represented, and Board of Finance to work with Exposition Company; latter chartered locally, $10 stock certificates sold to public. City granted $1,000,000; state and Congress over $4,000,000.

Site: Portion of Fairmount Park, 236 acres, presented "free of all expense" by city. Of 167 buildings erected, only one was permanent. Built of "granite, glass and iron," Memorial Hall became Philadelphia's Museum of Art.

Dates, Attendance: May 10-Nov. 10, 1876; officially "opened" by President Grant. Attendance almost 10,000,000; over 8,000,000 paid.

Participants: All states and territories and 49 foreign countries represented; 26 of former and some of latter erected own buildings. Exhibitors numbered 30,000; many Federal displays included Mint Exhibit.

Comment: Our first "international exhibition of the arts, manufactures and products of the earth" proved to American citizens and foreign visitors alike that U.S. had "grown up...able to takes its place among nations of the world in commerce and industry." With 71 acres under roof, architecture was of "gingerbread" type, its influence still felt in older sections of some cities. Multiple-structure approach, as opposed to single large building, followed new European plan. Exposition emphasized machines and mechanical progress; "served as inspiration for decades" for industrial expansion. Alexander Graham Bell exhibited his telephone for first time. Aesthetically, America was electrified by display of work of world's artists. Previously, material problems concerned our young nation; art playing no significant part in American life. With this awakening, numerous art schools and societies sprang into being; there was rush of American students to Paris. Total impact on our cultural life was remarkable and permanent.

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