BRUCE THOMAS COLLECTION OF SO-CALLED DOLLARS AND OTHER MEDALS
HK-005 MS 62 BN THICK

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Coin Details

Origin/Country: United States NEW YORK, NY 1853
Design Description: SO-CALLED DOLLARS - HIBLER & KAPPEN
Item Description: COPPER SC$1 1853 NY HK-5 CRYSTAL PALACE HK-5 Bruce Thomas Collection
Full Grade: NGC MS 62 BN
Owner: Bruce Thomas Collection

Set Details

Custom Sets: BRUCE THOMAS COLLECTION OF SO-CALLED DOLLARS AND OTHER MEDALS
Competitive Sets: This coin is not competing in any sets.
Research: NGC Coin Explorer NGC Coin Price Guide

Owner Comments:

(1) MS 63 RB AND (1) MS 64 RB LISTED FINER IN THE NGC CENSUS OF A TOTAL OF ONLY (8) AS OF 12/2021.

THIS EXAMPLE WAS PREVIOUSLY IN THE DONALD ENSLEY COLLECTION FROM MICHIGAN.

A NGC GRADED MS 61 BN EXAMPLE SOLD FOR $1,527.50 BY HERITAGE AUCTIONS IN 2014. A NGC MS 63 ROTATED DIES ERROR EXAMPLE SOLD FOR $4,560.00 BY HERITAGE AUCTIONS IN 2018.

CRYSTAL PALACE 1853 NEW YORK CITY, NY

TYPE I--1853 DOLLAR. Engraved by Charles Stubenrauch, formerly a mint engraver in Darmstadt, Germany.

Purpose: To exhibit "industry of all nations for...comparison, competition, instruction and encouragement."

Organization: First "International" exposition held in United States. Following 1851 London Crystal Palace Exhibition, New York group, including Horace Greeley, chartered "The Association for the Exhibition of the Industry of all Nations"; built Crystal Palace at cost of over $600,000. No direct grants from city or state but former did lease ground free for five years from 1852 on condition that (1) building be "chiefly of iron and glass," (2) admission fee not exceed 50 cents. Federal government provided "neither financial support nor official sanction" but charged no duty on goods imported for exhibition purposes, which practice still prevails today.

Site, Dates: South side 42nd Street between 5th and 6th Avenues to west of present New York Library, known as Reservoir Square; now Bryant Park. First exhibition opened July 14, 1853; ran intermittently until Oct. 5, 1858 when building was destroyed by fire.

America's first foray into the promotion of the fruits of the industrial age followed the successful 1851 Great Exhibition in England. It showcased the industrial achievements of the world and demonstrated the nationalistic pride of a relatively young nation and all that America stood for. The English influence lead to the construction of an American version of the English Crystal Palace in iron and glass as the Grand Hall for the Exhibition.

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