Bill Jones small cents
1C LINCOLN, WHEAT REVERSE (1909 V.D.B.)

Obverse:

Enlarge

Reverse:

Enlarge

Coin Details

Origin/Country: UNITED STATES
Design Description: CENTS - LINCOLN, WHEAT REVERSE
Item Description: 1C 1909 VDB
Full Grade: NGC MS 65 RD
Owner: BillJones

Set Details

Custom Sets: This coin is not in any custom sets.
Competitive Sets: Bill Jones' Type Set Excluding Modern Issues   Score: 288
Bill Jones' Type Set   Score: 288
Bill Jones small cents   Score: 288
Biill Jones Basic Type set with out gold   Score: 288
Bill Jones' Basic Type set   Score: 288
Bill Jones' 20th century Mint Stat and Proof Type Set   Score: 288
Research: NGC Coin Explorer NGC Coin Price Guide

Owner Comments:

The Lincoln cent was introduced to the public on August 2, 1909. According an article by R. S. Yeoman, who was the original author of the Red Book, the demand for the coin was unprecedented. People lined up at the Philadelphia mint to get the first coins issued, and the limit was two per customer. At the sub-treasury, which acted as the U.S. Government’s bank at the time, the limit was one hundred per customer. Newsboys and others enjoyed a brief but brisk business in selling the new coins for from two to five cents each.

Soon after the coin appeared, however, some people noticed that artist Victor David Brenner had placed his initials at the bottom of the reverse. Some people objected to that which led to the removal of the initials, which created another type for the coin.

Victor David Brenner designed the Lincoln cent. Previously he had designed a marketed a Lincoln medal (shown right) and a Lincoln plaque (shown with the next Lincoln cent. During a modeling secession with President Theodore Roosevelt Brenner mentioned his Lincoln projects to chief executive and showed a medal and perhaps the plaque. Roosevelt picked up on the idea, and the project to make the Lincoln cent a reality was born.

A large number of the 1909-VDB Philadelphia cents were saved because they were the first of their kind. As a result this coin is common in Mint State condition, and even fairly common in Red Uncirculated Mint State. Demand for type coins has driven up the prices in recent years. A fairly significant number of the VDB cents from the San Francisco mint were saved as well, but with a lower mintage of 484,000, that issue has gained a reputation among collectors and non collectors that has made that coin a numismatic legend.

To follow or send a message to this user,
please log in