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USA-Philippines Top Pops

Owner:  JAA
Last Modified:  1/13/2018
Set Description
This Custom Registry Set showcases my USA-Philippines Top Pop specimens. All USA-Philippines Top Pop coins are very special and the sixteen coins in this set are superb examples of these great rarities.


Slot Name
Origin/Country
Item Description
Full Grade
Owner Comments
Pics
View Coin 1903 Half Centavo PF67 RD - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 7/0 United States BRONZE 1/2C 1903 USA-PHIL EX. DR. GREG PINEDA KM-162 PCGS PF 67 RD SPECIFICATIONS
Mint: Philadelphia
Mint Mark: None
Mintage: 2,558
Designer: Melicio Figueroa
Engraver Charles Barber
Composition: Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc and tin)
Weight: 2.6000g
Diameter: 17.5mm
Edge: Plain

Pedigree: Ex:The Dr. Greg Pineda Collection

The Half Centavo was designed by Melicio Figueroa. The obverse design shows a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

Business strikes of the Half Centavo coin were struck at the Philadelphia Mint in 1903 (12,084,000) and 1904 (5,654,000). The Half Centavo coin was poorly accepted by the public and no further business strikes of this denomination were made after 1904. For lack of use over 7,500,000 Half Centavos were withdrawn from circulation. Most of these were sent back to the United States where they were melted and then re-coined into One Centavo pieces in 1908. That leaves a little less than 60% of the origional total mintage still available to collectors today.

A limited number of Proof Half Centavos were produced at the Philadelphia mint from 1903 through 1906 and again in 1908. The mintage figures for proof Half Centavos is as follows:1903 (2,558), 1904 (1,355), 1905 (471), 1906 (500), and 1908 (500). The 1905, 1906, and 1908 Half Centavos were PROOF ONLY ISSUES.

This lovely full red SUPERB GEM is pedigreed from the Dr. Greg Pineda Philippine Collection. Although the 1903 Proof Half Centavo had a mintage of 2,558 coins full red GEMs are EXTREMELY RARE. The combined PCGS/NGC population of 1903 Proof Half Centavos in PF67 RD is only 10 specimens with 1 graded higher.

NGC Population: 2/0 (8/14/2020)
PCGS Population: 8/1 (8/14/2020)
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 10/1 (8/14/2020)
View Coin 1904 Half Centavo MS66 RB - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 4/0 United States BRONZE 1/2C 1904 USA-PHIL KM-162 PCGS MS 66 RB Mint: Philadelphia
Mint Mark: None
Mintage: 5,654,000
Designer: Melicio Figueroa
Engraver: Charles Barber
Composition: Bronze
Weight: 2.6000g
Diameter: 17.5mm
Edge: Plain

NGC Population: 0/0 (8/14/2020)
PCGS Population: 4/1 (8/14/2020)
Combined N GC/PCGS Population: 4/1 (8/14/2020)
View Coin 1904 Half Centavo PF66 RB - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 4/0 United States BRONZE 1/2C 1904 USA-PHIL KM-162 PCGS PF 66 RB The 1904 Proof Half Centavo had a mintage of 1,355. Despite its relatively high mintage compared to other years in this series proof 1904 Half Centavos in this grade are much rarer than the mintage figures would suggest. PCGS Coin Facts lists the "Relative Rarity by Type" for 1904 Half Centavos in PR65RB or above as the rarest in the series and assigns it a grade rarity of R-8.5. Of the five years that proof Half Centavos were produced 1904 is the only year that no specimens have been graded PF67 by any of the major grading services. Not only is PF66 the Top Grade for this year but the total number of available specimens in this grade is extremely small. The Combined PCGS/NGC Population for 1904 Half Centavos in PF66 is only 3 PF66BN, 4 PF66RB, and 3 PF66RD.

The obverse of this rareTop Pop specimen is a beautiful uniform Dark Cherry Red. The reverse is 90% Red with Dark Cherry Red periphery toning. A truly beautiful coin!
View Coin 1908 Half Centavo PF67 RB - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 3/0 United States BRONZE 1/2C 1908 USA-PHIL KM-162 PCGS PF 67 RB Mint: Philadelphia
Mint Mark: None
Mintage: 500
Designer: Melicio Figueroa
Engraver: Charles Barber
Composition: Bronze
Weight: 2.6000g
Diameter: 17.5mm
Edge: Plain

This beautiful rainbow toned SUPERB GEM is from the "Just Having Fun Collection". The 1908 Half Centavo is a PROOF ONLY ISSUE with a mintage of only 500. The Combined NGC/PCGS population for this rare date in PF67 is only three specimens with none graded finer.

The Half Centavo was designed by Melicio Figueroa. The obverse design shows a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

Business strikes of the Half Centavo coin were struck at the Philadelphia Mint in 1903 (12,084,000) and 1904 (5,654,000). The Half Centavo coin was poorly accepted by the public and no further business strikes of this denomination were made after 1904. For lack of use over 7,500,000 Half Centavos were withdrawn from circulation. Most of these were sent back to the United States where they were melted and then re-coined into One Centavo pieces in 1908. That leaves a little less than 60% of the origional total mintage still available to collectors today.

A limited number of Proof Half Centavos were produced at the Philadelphia mint from 1903 through 1906 and again in 1908. The mintage figures for proof Half Centavos is as follows:1903 (2,558), 1904 (1,355), 1905 (471), 1906 (500), and 1908 (500). The 1905, 1906, and 1908 Half Centavos were PROOF ONLY ISSUES.

NGC Population: 0/0 (8/14/2020)
PCGS Population: 3/0 (8/14/2020)
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 3/0 (8/14/2020)

View Coin 1904 One Centavo PF67 RB - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 2/0 United States BRONZE 1C 1904 USA-PHIL KM-163 NGC PF 67 RB Specifications: Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc and tin), 80 Grains, 24mm.

The One Centavo was designed by Melicio Figueroa. The obverse design shows a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

Business strikes using Figueroa's obverse and reverse designs were made at the Philadelphia Mint from 1903 through 1905, the San Francisco Mint from 1908 through 1920 and the Manila Mint from 1920 through 1936. The Manila mint was the only United States branch mint ever established outside the continental United States.

A limited number of proof One Centavos were produced at the Philadelphia mint from 1903 through 1906 and again in 1908.

The 1904 Proof One Centavo had a mintage of 1,355.

This beautiful SUPERB GEM PROOF is a TOP POP coin with a combined NCC/PCGS population of only two specimens in this lofty grade and none graded higher.

The photos really do not do justice to this spectacular beauty. Both obverse and reverse have deep mirror surfaces. The obverse is beautifully red, green, purple, and gold toned while the reverse is an untoned Full Blazing Red.
View Coin 1905 One Centavo PF67 RB - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 1/0 United States BRONZE 1C 1905 USA-PHIL KM-163 NGC PF 67 RB Specifications: Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc and tin), 80 Grains (4.7000g), 24mm.
Mintage: 471
NGC Population in PF67: 1 PF67RB (None graded higher)
PCGS Population in PR67: 1 PR67RD (None graded higher)

The One Centavo was designed by Melicio Figueroa. The obverse design shows a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield. Business strikes using Figueroa's obverse and reverse designs were made at the Philadelphia Mint from 1903 through 1905, the San Francisco Mint from 1908 through 1920 and the Manila Mint from 1920 through 1936. The Manila mint was the only United States branch mint ever established outside the continental United States. A limited number of proof One Centavos were produced at the Philadelphia mint from 1903 through 1906 and again in 1908.

The 1905 Proof One Centavo had a mintage of only 471, which is the lowest mintage in the Proof One Centavo series. This beautiful SUPERB GEM PROOF is literally in a class by itself as it is the only 1905 Proof One Centavo that NGC has graded in this lofty grade and no specimens have been graded higher. This specimen is fully reflective and 75% red with attractive green, pink, and sky blue toning.
View Coin 1927-PM Culion Leper Colony One Centavo, Type lll (KM-A5) AU55 - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 1/0 United States COPPER-NICKEL 1C 1927PM USA-PHIL CULION LEPER COLONY 2 BUTTONS - STRAIGHT "S" KM-A5 NGC AU 55 1927PM One Centavo, Type lll (KM-A5) (McFadden #770)

The obverse of the 1927PM Culion Leper Colony One Centavo features the bust of Filipino revolutionary hero Apolinario Mabini (known as the "brains of the Philippine Revolution"). The obverse legend reads "CULION LEPER COLONY - PHILIPPINE ISLANDS". The reverse features the seal of the Philippine Health Service. Above the seal is the legend "PHILIPPINE HEALTH SERVICE". Below the seal is the date "1927" and the denomination "ONE CENTAVO". The Mint Marks "P" and "M" are to the right and left of the value.

There are three die variations of the 1927PM One Centavo. This specimen is Type lll (KM-A5) which is the rarest of the three. Type lll can be distinguished from the other die varieties by two buttons on Mabini's coat.

This choice AU specimen is literally in a class by itself as the single finest certified example of the 1927PM One Centavo Type lll (KM-A5). The Combined NGC/PCGS certified population for this coin in AU55 is one specimen with none graded finer.

SPECIFICATIONS
Mint: U.S. Manila Mint
Mint Mark: "P" & "M"
Mintage: 30,000 (for all die varieties)
Composition: Copper-Nickel (75% Copper, 25% Nickel)
Diameter: 21.2 mm

View Coin 1932-M One Centavo MS66 RD - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 17/0 United States BRONZE 1C 1932 M USA-PHIL KM-163 NGC MS 66 RD Mintage: 4,000,000
Composition: Bronze (95% copper, 5% zinc and tin)
Weight: 4.7000g (80 grains)
Diameter: 24 mm
Mint Mark: M

The 1925 through 1936 One Centavo uses the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1903 - 1922 One Centavo and was struck to the same specifications. Starting in 1925 all One Centavos struck at the Manila Mint carried a M Mint Mark on the reverse to the left of the date.

The NGC population the 1932 M One Centavo in MS66 Red is 7 specimens with none graded higher. The combined NGC/PCGS certified population of this coin in MS66 Red is 17 coins with none graded higher (12/01/2013).

This gorgeous, well struck, specimen is a brilliant Full Red with proof like fields.
View Coin 1944-S One Centavo Double Die Variety #2 - PCGS Population 1/0 United States BRASS (COPPER-ZINC) 1C 1944 S DDR USA-PHIL ALLEN-3.06aa Allen 3.06aa PCGS MS 64 RD 1944-S One Centavo DDO V2 (Allen 3.06aa)

The Allen catalog of U.S. Philippine Coins recognizes four Die Varieties for this date:
1) 1944-S (Allen 3.06) The normal coin for this date.
2)1944-S Double Die Obverse (Allen 3.06a). This Double Die Variety shows doubling at "STATES OF".
3) 1944-S Double Die Obverse Variety #2 (Allen 3.06aa). This Double Die Variety "shows doubling of the letters IPPINES on the scroll and the scroll itself as well as the letters of AMERICA most noticeable at the M and C".
4) 1944-S Incomplete 4 (Allen 3.06b). This fairly common variety has the "base of the last 4 missing at the left side".

Of the three die varieties the Double Die Variety #2 (Allen 3.06aa) is by far the scarcest and most difficult to find. This specimen is particularly interesting as in addition to doubling of the letters in STATES and AMERICA thr second 4 in the date appears to be triple punched.

I purchased this coin raw from "The Coin Den" in May 2008. Although I would have preferred to certify this coin years ago neither NGC or PCGS were recognizing Allen Die Varieties in 2008 and NGC only recently recognized Allen Die Varieties for the 1944-S One Centavo. I submitted this specimen to PCGS at the August 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money. Graded PCGS MS64nRed this specimen is the only PCGS certified example of this scarce die variety.

PCGS Population: 1/0
View Coin 1944-S One Centavo INCOMPLETE 4 MS67 - PCGS Population 1/0 United States BRASS (COPPER-ZINC) 1C 1944 S USA-PHIL Allen 3.06b KM-179 PCGS MS 67 RD The 1944 One Centavo uses the same obverse and reverse designs as the pre-war One Centavo but has a different wartime composition.

The pre-war One Centavo was a bronze alloy of 95% copper, and 5% zinc and tin. Both copper and tin are important strategic materials during wartime. In order to conserve tin the wartime composition of the One Centavo was changed to a brass alloy of 95% copper and 5% zinc. This is the same alloy the mint used for the production of U.S. wartime pennies dated 1944-1946. The mint produced this alloy by combining ingots of pure copper with salvaged 70% copper shell casings.

During the 1942 through 1944 Japanese occupation of the Philippines, nearly all coins disappeared from circulation. In the occupied areas the Japanese collected all of the coins, melted them down and shipped them back to Japan. The few pre-war coins that escaped the melting pots were hoarded and hid away until after the war. Most daily commerce was conducted with low denomination paper currency (Emergency or Guerilla Currency) printed by Guerrilla military units, local municipalities, or Military and Civilian Currency Boards authorized by General MacArthur or the Commonwealth government-in-exile under President Quezon.

During the Japanese occupation there was a very active resistance movement in the Philippines, and allied inteligence was very much aware, of the economic situation in the islands, and the need to bring new coins and currency with them when they liberated the Philippines.

In preparation for General MacArthurs return to the Philippines, the Treasury Department ordered the San Francisco Mints to strike millions of One Centavo coins. When American forces liberated the Philippines in 1944 - 1945 they brought with them Fifty Eight Million 1944-S One Centavo coins.

The PCGS population for the 1944-S One Centavo in MS67 Red is six coins with none graded higher. The combined PCGS/NGC certified population for this coin in MS67 Red is only 12 coins with none graded higher.

This FULL RED SUPERB GEM is a die variety with the base of the last 4 missing at the left side (Allen number 3.06b). The 2012 edition of the Allen guide book lists the highest certified grade for this die variety at MS66 making this coin unique in MS67 RED.
View Coin 1921(M) Five Centavos MS64 - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 12/0 United States COPPER-NICKEL 5C 1921 USA-PHIL EX. WALDEN PHILIPPINE TERRITORIAL COLLECTION KM-164, PCGS MS 64 Mintage: 2,132,000
Catalog: KM-164
Composition: Copper-Nickel
Weight: 5.2500g
Diameter: 21.3mm

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of Five Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time Five Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines.

The Five Centavos struck at the Manila Mint in 1920 and 1921 used the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1903 - 1919 Five Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M) and 1921(M) Five Centavos is that they have no Mint Mark.

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino male seated next to an anvil holding a hammer in his right hand, his left arm raised, and in the background to his left is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

A pleasing coin with an exemplary appearance. This lustrous TOP POP example of the 1921 Five Centavos is pedigreed from the "Walden Philippine Territorial Collection".

NGC Population: 2/0
PCGS Population: 11/0 (PCGS Condition Census)
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 13/0
View Coin 1932-M Five Centavos MS65 - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 16/0 United States COPPER-NICKEL 5C 1932 M USA-PHIL KM-175 PCGS MS 65 Mintage: 3,956,000
Composition: Copper-Nickel
Weight: 4.7500g (75.16 grains)
Diameter: 19mm
Mint Mark: M

The obverse and reverse designs of the 1930 through 1935 (reduced size and weight) Five Centavos is the same as the 1903 through 1928 Five Centavos.

In 1906 a rise in the price of silver forced the reduction of the fineness and weight for all Philippine silver issues. The reduced size Twenty Centavos coins of 1907 - 1929 had a diameter of 21mm and were easily confused with the 21.3 mm Five Centavos of 1903 through 1928. This confusion resulted in a mismatching of dies for these two denominations in 1918 and again in 1928. A solution was found by reducing the diameter of the Five Centavos coin to 19 mm beginning in 1930. The reduced size and weight Five Centavos were made at the Manila Mint from 1930 through 1932, and again in 1934 and 1935.

In war time nickel and copper are strategic materials critical to a nations war effort. During the WWII Japanese occupation of the Philippines (1942 -1945) many pre-war Five Centavos were collected melted down and sent back to Japan.

The combined NGC/PCGS certified population for the 1932-M Five Centavos in MS65 is 16 specimens with none graded higher (12/01/2013).
View Coin 1944-S Five Centavos MS67 - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 7/0 United States COPPER-ZINC-NICKEL 5C 1944 S USA-PHIL KM-180a PCGS MS 67 Mint: San Francisco
Mint Mark: S
Obverse Designed: Melicio Figueroa
Mintage: 14,040,000
Composition: Copper (65%) - Zinc (23%) - Nickel (12%)
Weight: 4.9200g
Diameter: 19mm
Edge: Plain

The 1944 and 1945 Five Centavos use the same obverse and reverse designs as the pre-war Five Centavos but have a different Wartime composition.

The pre-war Five Centavos had a composition of Copper (75%) and Nickel (25%). Both Copper and Nickel are important strategic materials during wartime. Copper is needed for the production of shell casings and Nickel is an essential ingredient in the manufacture of armor plating for ships, tanks, etc. In order to conserve Copper and Nickel the wartime alloy of the Five Centavos was changed to Copper (65%), Zinc (23%), and Nickel (12%).

During the 1942 through 1944 Japanese occupation of the Philippines nearly all coins disappeared from circulation. In the occupied areas the Japanese collected all of the coins melted them down and shipped them back to Japan. The few pre-war coins that escaped the melting pots were horded and hid away until after the war. Most daily commerce was conducted with low denomination paper currency (Emergency or Guerilla Currency) printed by Guerrilla military units, local municipalities, or Military and Civilian Currency Boards authorized by General MacArthur or the Commonwealth government-in-exile under President Quezon.

During the Japanese occupation there was a very active resistance movement in the Philippines and allied inteligence was very much aware, of the economic situation in the islands, and the need to bring new coins and currency with them when they liberated the Philippines.

In preparation for General MacArthur's return to the Philippines the Treasury Department ordered the Philadelphia, and San Francisco Mints to strike millions of Five Centavos coins. The Philadelphia Mint struck 21,198,000 Five Centavos dated 1944. There is no Mint Mark on the coins struck at Philadelphia. The San Francisco Mint Struck 14,040,000 Five Centavos dated 1944 and 72,796,000 dated 1945. Coins struck at San Francisco have a S Mint Mark.

When American forces liberated the Philippines in 1944 - 1945 they brought with them the Wartime Alloy Victory Coins produced in the continental United States.

PCGS Population: 7/0
NGC Population: 0/0
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 7/0

The 1944 and 1945 Five Centavos use the same obverse and reverse designs as the pre-war Five Centavos but have a different Wartime composition.

The pre-war Five Centavos had a composition of Copper (75%) and Nickel (25%). Both Copper and Nickel are important strategic materials during wartime. Copper is needed for the production of shell casings and Nickel is an essential ingredient in the manufacture of armor plating for ships, tanks, etc. In order to conserve Copper and Nickel the wartime alloy of the Five Centavos was changed to Copper (65%), Zinc (23%), and Nickel (12%).

During the 1942 through 1944 Japanese occupation of the Philippines nearly all coins disappeared from circulation. In the occupied areas the Japanese collected all of the coins melted them down and shipped them back to Japan. The few pre-war coins that escaped the melting pots were horded and hid away until after the war. Most daily commerce was conducted with low denomination paper currency (Emergency or Guerilla Currency) printed by Guerrilla military units, local municipalities, or Military and Civilian Currency Boards authorized by General MacArthur or the Commonwealth government-in-exile under President Quezon.

During the Japanese occupation there was a very active resistance movement in the Philippines and allied inteligence was very much aware, of the economic situation in the islands, and the need to bring new coins and currency with them when they liberated the Philippines.

In preparation for General MacArthur's return to the Philippines the Treasury Department ordered the Philadelphia, and San Francisco Mints to strike millions of Five Centavos coins. The Philadelphia Mint struck 21,198,000 Five Centavos dated 1944. There is no Mint Mark on the coins struck at Philadelphia. The San Francisco Mint Struck 14,040,000 Five Centavos dated 1944 and 72,796,000 dated 1945. Coins struck at San Francisco have a S Mint Mark.

When American forces liberated the Philippines in 1944 - 1945 they brought with them the Wartime Alloy Victory Coins produced in the continental United States.
View Coin 1945 D/D Ten Centavos MS66 - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 6/0 United States SILVER 10C 1945 D/D USA-PHIL ALLEN-9.05a KM-181 NGC MS 66 Allen Catalog Number 9.05a
1945 D/D Ten Centavos
D over D Mint Mark

Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 2.0000g
ASW: 0.0482oz
Diameter: 16.7mm
Edge: Reeded

The Ten Centavos of 1937 through 1945 continued the same obverse design used on the 1903 through 1935 Ten Centavos. The reverse used the Commonwealth Arms design which was common to to the 1936 commemoratives and all Philippine coins from 1937 through 1945. Ten Centavos were made at the Manila Mint from 1937 through 1941, and at the Denver Mint in 1944 and 1945.

This Superb Gem is a NGC Top Pop coin with a population of only five specimens in this grade. The combined NGC/PCGS population for this die variety in MS66 is only six specimens with none graded higher.
View Coin 1920(M) Fifty Centavos MS64 - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 13/0 United States SILVER 50C 1920 USA-PHIL KM-171 NGC MS 64 Mintage: 420,000
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 10.0000g (154.32 grains)
ASW: 0.2411oz
Diameter: 27.5 mm
Edge: Reeded
Mint Mark: None

When the Manila Mint opened in July 1920 it took over production of Fifty Centavo coins for the U.S. Territory of the Philippines. Prior to that time Fifty Centavo coins had been manufactured in the continental United States at either the Philadelphia or San Francisco Mints and transported to the Philippines. The Fifty Centavos struck at the Manila Mint in 1920 and 1921 used the same obverse and reverse designs as the 1907 - 1919 Fifty Centavos and were struck to the same specifications. A notable feature of the 1920(M) and 1921(M) Fifty Centavos was that they had no Mint Mark.

The obverse design by Melicio Figueroa features a young Filipino woman standing to the right in a flowing dress while striking an anvil with a hammer held in her right hand, the left hand is raised and holding an olive branch. In the background is a billowing volcano. The reverse design, also by Melicio Figueroa, depicts an eagle with spread wings perched atop an American shield.

The NGC population for the 1920 Fifty Centavos in MS64 is 3 coins with none graded higher. The combined NGC/PCGS population is 13/1 (12/01/2013).

This attractive NGC Top Pop example of the 1920 Fifty Centavos is from the "Just Having Fun Collection".
View Coin 1936-M Murphy-Quezon Fifty Centavos - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 6/0 United States SILVER 50C 1936 M USA-PHIL MURPHY-QUEZON KM-176 NGC MS 66 Mintage: 20,000
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 10.0000g (154.32 grains)
ASW: 0.2411oz
Diameter: 27.5mm

In 1936 the Manila Mint produced a set of three coins to commemorate the founding of the Commonwealth Of The Philippines on November 15,1935. The set consisted of a Fifty Centavos, and two One Peso Coins. The coins were designed by Ambrosio Morales, a Professor of Fine Arts at the University of the Philippines. The two commemorative Pesos were struck in .800 fineness silver. The Fifty Centavos was struck in .750 fineness silver. The three coin set had a face value of 2.5 Pesos, equal to $1.25 in U.S. Dollars, and sold for $3.13.

The obverse design of the Murphy-Quezon Fifty Centavos features portraits of the first Philippine President Manuel L. Quezon and U.S. Governor General Frank Murphy. The reverse design depicts the official seal of "The Commonwealth of the Philippines". The actual number of existing Murphy-Quezon Fifty Centavos is far less than the mintage figures would suggest as many of these coins were crated and thrown into Manila Bay, near Corregidor, in 1942 to avoid seizure by the invading forces of Japan.

This beautifully toned, well struck specimen is tied for the finest certified by NGC and PCGS.

NGC Population: 5/0
PCGS Population: 1/0

View Coin 1945-S Fifty Centavos MS67 STAR - NGC Population 1/0 United States SILVER 50C 1945 S USA-PHIL KM-183 NGC MS 67 Mintage: 18,120,000
NGC Population in MS67 STAR: 1/0
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.7500
Weight: 10.0000g
ASW: 0.2411oz
Diameter: 27.5mm
Edge: Reeded

The Fifty Centavos of 1944 and 1945 continued the same obverse design used on the 1903 through 1921 Fifty Centavos. The reverse used the Commonwealth Arms design which was common to the 1936 commemoratives and all Philippine coins from 1937 through 1945. Fifty Centavos were made at the San Francisco Mint in 1944 and 1945.
The 1945 S Fifty Centavos had a mintage of 18,120,000.

This spectacular fully brilliant, untoned, SUPERB GEM is the single finest NGC certified example of the war time Fifty Centavos. Although NGC has graded two 1944-S Fifty Centavos and twenty-one 1945-S Fifty Centavos as MS67 this specimen stands alone as the only coin of its type to receive the coveted NGC STAR designation for exceptional eye appeal.

View Coin 1936M Roosevelt-Quezon Peso MS67 - Combined NGC/PCGS Population 15/0 United States SILVER PESO 1936 M USA-PHIL ROOSEVELT-QUEZON KM-177 NGC MS 67 Mint: Manila
Mint Mark "M"
Mintage: 10,000
Designer: Ambrocio Morales
Composition: Silver
Fineness: 0.8000
Weight: 20.0000g
ASW: 0.5144oz
Diameter: 35mm

In 1936 the Manila Mint produced a set of three coins to commemorate the founding of the Commonwealth Of The Philippines on November 15,1935. The set consisted of a Fifty Centavos, and two One Peso Coins. The coins were designed by Ambrosio Morales, a Professor of Fine Arts at the University of the Philippines. The two commemorative Pesos were struck in .800 fineness silver. The Fifty Centavos was struck in .750 fineness silver. The three coin set had a face value of 2.5 Pesos, equal to $1.25 in U.S. Dollars, and sold for $3.13.

The obverse design of the Roosevelt-Quezon Peso features portraits of the first Philippine President Manuel L. Quezon and U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt. This was the second appearance of a living U.S. President on a coin issued by the United States. The other was on the U.S. Sesquicentennial commemorative Half Dollar issued in 1926 on which living President Calvin Coolidge was portrayed.

The reverse design of the Roosevelt-Quezon Peso depicts the official seal of "The Commonwealth of the Philippines".
Design elements of the Commonwealth Reverse incorporate the rich history of the Philippines. The eagle perched atop the shield, of course, represents the United States. The shield used was an adaptation of a design used for the official seal of The Government of the Philippine Islands which appeared on Philippine paper money starting in 1905 (Allen 2008). The three stars at the top of the shield represent the three main geographical regions of the Philippines: Luzon, Mindanao, and the Visayas. The lettering on the Scroll beneath the shield reads Commonwealth of the Philippines. The oval in the center of the shield depicts a modification of the Coat of Arms of the City of Manila which dates to 1596.

On the 20th of March, 1596 King Philip The II bestowed upon the ensigne y siempre leal City of Manila a Coat of Arms such as is possessed by other cities of the Indies. It shall consist of a shield which shall have in its upper part a golden castle on a red field closed by blue doors and windows and which shall be surmounted by a crown and on the lower half on a blue field, a half lion and half dolphin of silver armed and langued gules (red nails and tongue). The said lion shall hold in his paws a sword with guards and hilt. (Royal Edict of March 20, 1596 as quoted in Perez 1946 and 1975)

If you look at the attached picture, you can clearly see the castle surmounted by a crown and the half lion-half dolphin holding a sword with guards and hilt in his paws.

The mintage of the 1936M Roosevelt-Quezon Peso was 10,000 coins, however, the actual number of existing coins is far less as many of these coins were crated and thrown into Manila Bay, near Corregidor, in 1942 to avoid seizure by the invading forces of Japan.

This "Top Pop" "Superb Gem" is among the finest known examples of the Roosevelt-Quezon Peso. NGC has graded only seven (7) specimens in the lofty grade of MS67 with none graded higher. PCGS has graded only eight (8) specimens in MS67 with none graded higher. This hauntingly gorgeous specimen is boldly struck and exhibits a deep tone comprised of cobalt, russet, and deep burgundy.

NGC Population: 7/0 (11/25/2020)
PCGS Population: 8/0 (11/25/2020)
Combined NGC/PCGS Population: 15/0 (11/25/2020)

References:
U.S./Philippine Coins, 6th Edition, 2008, by Lyman L. Allen
The Copper Coinage of the Philippines by Dr. Gilbert S. Perez, first published in the Coin Collectors Journal, Sept-October 1946 and reprinted in Philippine Numismatic Monographs Number 19 in 1975.

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